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Marillion

Started by tri.ad, April 27, 2009, 11:38:37 AM

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jammindude

I just ordered the 2019 remix of clutching at straws last week, and it just arrived today. I haven't even had a chance to listen to it yet.

The remix will be interesting to hear but it sounds like the crown jewel is going to be that two disc live show.

ytserush

Quote from: jammindude on November 14, 2020, 09:00:01 PM
I just ordered the 2019 remix of clutching at straws last week, and it just arrived today. I haven't even had a chance to listen to it yet.

The remix will be interesting to hear but it sounds like the crown jewel is going to be that two disc live show.

I still prefer the original mix, maybe because of ridiculous amount of miles I have on it. The live show is my favorite aspect of it. Nothing will top Milan '88 on that tour for me but Edinburgh is pretty good too. The tape cuts out rather jarringly before the last three songs of the show but I think those are covers.


HOF

So I've been listening to this Marillion fan podcast, which is fairly well done and informative (and the hosts have outrageously great accents).

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/between-you-and-me-a-podcast-about-marillion/id1530960617?i=1000499894589

They're going through the Marillion catalog chronologically to discuss the history of the band. This week's episode was about the transition to Steve Hogarth as singer. It's interesting to hear the perspective from a long time fan who lived the Fish to H transition. I've always been aware of how jarring the transition was for many fans, but having come to Marillion around 2001/2002 and starting with Season's End, I obviously didn't experience that myself.

In particular, he talked about the shock of hearing Hooks in You as the lead single for the first time and thinking the band had gone party rock/metal. But then when he heard the B-side, After Me, he realized everything was going to be OK.

I remember thinking Hooks in You was a total throw away radio track the first time I heard it too. But I've grown to like it as a pretty unique episode in the band's history. Certainly it's the meatiest lead guitar effort of Rothery's career. It's fun but stupid and that's ok. What I also find interesting though is it's essentially a paired down and amped up re-write of Incommunicado. Less widdly widdly Mark Kelly and more pumped up Steve Rothery.

Listening to the album again and thinking about it, I just find the whole thing a little comical, because the end result stands out like a sore thumb from the rest of the album, and it's not representative of a new direction for the band at all. Kind of a head fake, since I think as a whole Season's End was kind of a perfect bridge from Fish to H in the end. Curious if anyone else around here was a fan then and had a similar experience.

Stadler

Quote from: HOF on November 24, 2020, 03:13:01 PM
So I've been listening to this Marillion fan podcast, which is fairly well done and informative (and the hosts have outrageously great accents).

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/between-you-and-me-a-podcast-about-marillion/id1530960617?i=1000499894589

They're going through the Marillion catalog chronologically to discuss the history of the band. This week's episode was about the transition to Steve Hogarth as singer. It's interesting to hear the perspective from a long time fan who lived the Fish to H transition. I've always been aware of how jarring the transition was for many fans, but having come to Marillion around 2001/2002 and starting with Season's End, I obviously didn't experience that myself.

In particular, he talked about the shock of hearing Hooks in You as the lead single for the first time and thinking the band had gone party rock/metal. But then when he heard the B-side, After Me, he realized everything was going to be OK.

I remember thinking Hooks in You was a total throw away radio track the first time I heard it too. But I've grown to like it as a pretty unique episode in the band's history. Certainly it's the meatiest lead guitar effort of Rothery's career. It's fun but stupid and that's ok. What I also find interesting though is it's essentially a paired down and amped up re-write of Incommunicado. Less widdly widdly Mark Kelly and more pumped up Steve Rothery.

Listening to the album again and thinking about it, I just find the whole thing a little comical, because the end result stands out like a sore thumb from the rest of the album, and it's not representative of a new direction for the band at all. Kind of a head fake, since I think as a whole Season's End was kind of a perfect bridge from Fish to H in the end. Curious if anyone else around here was a fan then and had a similar experience.

I haven't listened to that podcast yet, but I'm that guy.  I got into Marillion with Misplaced Childhood, in real time.  I loved Clutching At Straws from minute one, and it's been my favorite Marillion album since.    FOR ME, I didn't hear the single first.  I heard the album, and so it was "King Of Sunset Town" and I was hooked from minute one.  It SOUNDED like CAS, and while it's not as good as CAS, it wasn't as radically different as Fish's solo record.   The problem for me was always viewing Hogarth/Helmer's lyrics through the lens of the VERY autobiographical Fish.  Was Hogarth the King?  What did that mean?    Hooks In You was just "Incommunicado, Part II" so there was no problem there.   The Space... was suitably deep, as was The Uninvited Guest.   They lost me with the preachy Season's End, and I felt - and I know this is weird - defensive and jealous about Berlin. Berlin was FISH'S city, bitches.   Where Marillion broke my heart was with Holiday's In Eden, where I realized - quickly - that everything WASN'T going to be ok.   

King Puppies and the Acid Guppies

Quote from: Stadler on November 26, 2020, 10:12:21 AM
Quote from: HOF on November 24, 2020, 03:13:01 PM
So I've been listening to this Marillion fan podcast, which is fairly well done and informative (and the hosts have outrageously great accents).

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/between-you-and-me-a-podcast-about-marillion/id1530960617?i=1000499894589

They're going through the Marillion catalog chronologically to discuss the history of the band. This week's episode was about the transition to Steve Hogarth as singer. It's interesting to hear the perspective from a long time fan who lived the Fish to H transition. I've always been aware of how jarring the transition was for many fans, but having come to Marillion around 2001/2002 and starting with Season's End, I obviously didn't experience that myself.

In particular, he talked about the shock of hearing Hooks in You as the lead single for the first time and thinking the band had gone party rock/metal. But then when he heard the B-side, After Me, he realized everything was going to be OK.

I remember thinking Hooks in You was a total throw away radio track the first time I heard it too. But I've grown to like it as a pretty unique episode in the band's history. Certainly it's the meatiest lead guitar effort of Rothery's career. It's fun but stupid and that's ok. What I also find interesting though is it's essentially a paired down and amped up re-write of Incommunicado. Less widdly widdly Mark Kelly and more pumped up Steve Rothery.

Listening to the album again and thinking about it, I just find the whole thing a little comical, because the end result stands out like a sore thumb from the rest of the album, and it's not representative of a new direction for the band at all. Kind of a head fake, since I think as a whole Season's End was kind of a perfect bridge from Fish to H in the end. Curious if anyone else around here was a fan then and had a similar experience.

I haven't listened to that podcast yet, but I'm that guy.  I got into Marillion with Misplaced Childhood, in real time.  I loved Clutching At Straws from minute one, and it's been my favorite Marillion album since.    FOR ME, I didn't hear the single first.  I heard the album, and so it was "King Of Sunset Town" and I was hooked from minute one.  It SOUNDED like CAS, and while it's not as good as CAS, it wasn't as radically different as Fish's solo record.   The problem for me was always viewing Hogarth/Helmer's lyrics through the lens of the VERY autobiographical Fish.  Was Hogarth the King?  What did that mean?    Hooks In You was just "Incommunicado, Part II" so there was no problem there.   The Space... was suitably deep, as was The Uninvited Guest.   They lost me with the preachy Season's End, and I felt - and I know this is weird - defensive and jealous about Berlin. Berlin was FISH'S city, bitches.   Where Marillion broke my heart was with Holiday's In Eden, where I realized - quickly - that everything WASN'T going to be ok.
I know a lot of people didn't like Holidays in Eden, and while it wasn't as good as Season's End, it was every bit as good as Brave and Afraid of Sunlight. At least, in my opinion. Where Marillion lost me a bit was with the run from This Strange Engine to Anoraknophobia. There are some good, even great, songs on those albums, overall they were very....blah.
aka Puppies_On_Acid
Quote from: Evermind on May 06, 2024, 07:39:06 AMHey Stadler, your PM inbox is full.
Quote from: HOF on April 02, 2024, 07:30:16 AMDerek Sherinian probably stands 10 feet away from the urinal, shoots from downtown, and announces loudly that he's making history.
Quote from: TAC, definitely not KingThes sng is are sounds rally nece an I lyke tha sungar

HOF

Quote from: Stadler on November 26, 2020, 10:12:21 AM
Quote from: HOF on November 24, 2020, 03:13:01 PM
So I've been listening to this Marillion fan podcast, which is fairly well done and informative (and the hosts have outrageously great accents).

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/between-you-and-me-a-podcast-about-marillion/id1530960617?i=1000499894589

They're going through the Marillion catalog chronologically to discuss the history of the band. This week's episode was about the transition to Steve Hogarth as singer. It's interesting to hear the perspective from a long time fan who lived the Fish to H transition. I've always been aware of how jarring the transition was for many fans, but having come to Marillion around 2001/2002 and starting with Season's End, I obviously didn't experience that myself.

In particular, he talked about the shock of hearing Hooks in You as the lead single for the first time and thinking the band had gone party rock/metal. But then when he heard the B-side, After Me, he realized everything was going to be OK.

I remember thinking Hooks in You was a total throw away radio track the first time I heard it too. But I've grown to like it as a pretty unique episode in the band's history. Certainly it's the meatiest lead guitar effort of Rothery's career. It's fun but stupid and that's ok. What I also find interesting though is it's essentially a paired down and amped up re-write of Incommunicado. Less widdly widdly Mark Kelly and more pumped up Steve Rothery.

Listening to the album again and thinking about it, I just find the whole thing a little comical, because the end result stands out like a sore thumb from the rest of the album, and it's not representative of a new direction for the band at all. Kind of a head fake, since I think as a whole Season's End was kind of a perfect bridge from Fish to H in the end. Curious if anyone else around here was a fan then and had a similar experience.

I haven't listened to that podcast yet, but I'm that guy.  I got into Marillion with Misplaced Childhood, in real time.  I loved Clutching At Straws from minute one, and it's been my favorite Marillion album since.    FOR ME, I didn't hear the single first.  I heard the album, and so it was "King Of Sunset Town" and I was hooked from minute one.  It SOUNDED like CAS, and while it's not as good as CAS, it wasn't as radically different as Fish's solo record.   The problem for me was always viewing Hogarth/Helmer's lyrics through the lens of the VERY autobiographical Fish.  Was Hogarth the King?  What did that mean?    Hooks In You was just "Incommunicado, Part II" so there was no problem there.   The Space... was suitably deep, as was The Uninvited Guest.   They lost me with the preachy Season's End, and I felt - and I know this is weird - defensive and jealous about Berlin. Berlin was FISH'S city, bitches.   Where Marillion broke my heart was with Holiday's In Eden, where I realized - quickly - that everything WASN'T going to be ok.

I didn't listen to all of the Fish era episodes, but the Clutching at Straws one was really good as they go pretty in depth into the lyrics and how they describe what Fish was going through at the time.

I agree Holidays in Eden was the real curve ball. It's funny though. I did not care for it either after hearing Season's End (as well as Anoraknophobia which was the current release at the time). It took getting Marbles and Brave to really get me into the band. But these days I actually think pretty highly of Holidays in Eden. It's a nice blend of pop showcasing H's voice and some more subtly prog moments. I could give or take Nothing Can Take Me Away From You Now, and the US release I initially bought also had the extremely clunky How Can It Hurt. But otherwise, there's not a bad song on that album.

Stadler

Well, let me be clear:  I like not love Hogarth.  I love his voice, I think he's an AMAZING front man, but I find him tiresome at times, and preachy.   I don't need Marillion to be "prog" - some of their best work isn't - but I do need them to be... vulnerable, for lack of a better word.   At times Hogarth can be a shade too sanctimonious, and a shade too ready to be different just for the sake of being different.   That was Holidays for me.   I love Brave, and, even though it took me a while I love Afraid of Sunlight too, but This Strange Engine turned me off to Marillion until Marbles (ironic, because TSE is supposed to be Hogarth's most personal work up to that time). 

It's weird, too, because Fish can be sanctimonious too at times (Brother 52, The Perception Of Johnny Punter) but it's offset by his willingness to be naked (the title track to Sunsets On Empire is just BRUTAL).  I don't get that same level of introspection from Hogarth (except on the excellent Marbles).   

jammindude

Anoraknophobia was the album that solidified my permanent status as a Marillion fan. That album is completely front to back solid. In fact, I suppose that's what makes their more recent work more disappointing to me. Because, other than the 2-disc Marbles, Anorak was the last "all killer no filler" album they did. And it's been 20 years.

HOF

Quote from: jammindude on November 26, 2020, 11:06:24 AM
Anoraknophobia was the album that solidified my permanent status as a Marillion fan. That album is completely front to back solid. In fact, I suppose that's what makes their more recent work more disappointing to me. Because, other than the 2-disc Marbles, Anorak was the last "all killer no filler" album they did. And it's been 20 years.

We're all different. Anorak is fine, and at times I've been really into it. But I think Sounds that Can't Be Made and FEAR are excellent albums and ones I prefer to Anorak. I really think FEAR is up there in terms of the bands stronger albums. It's gotten a lot of praise but also some flack, and I'm not sure if that's because expectations are high or what. I feel like it's a classic Marillion album and has some really powerful material. I can see if some people are turned off by the political content I guess, but musically I think it is great.

jammindude

Hot take - I really REALLY love Between You and Me, but the remix is even better.

HOF

Quote from: jammindude on November 26, 2020, 11:53:01 AM
Hot take - I really REALLY love Between You and Me, but the remix is even better.

Is that from the Remixomatosis release? I actually really like that album, especially the two versions of Map of the World and Fruit of the Wild Rose (an underrated Marillion track altogether).

jammindude

Quote from: HOF on November 26, 2020, 12:39:40 PM
Quote from: jammindude on November 26, 2020, 11:53:01 AM
Hot take - I really REALLY love Between You and Me, but the remix is even better.

Is that from the Remixomatosis release? I actually really like that album, especially the two versions of Map of the World and Fruit of the Wild Rose (an underrated Marillion track altogether).

It's the Mark Kelly remix, but I don't know what release it's from. It was shared with me by someone here at least 10 years ago (it's been so long, but I want to say it was romdrums??) and I immediately fell in love with it.

https://youtu.be/bu0OEsWbeuI

HOF

Quote from: jammindude on November 26, 2020, 03:56:36 PM
Quote from: HOF on November 26, 2020, 12:39:40 PM
Quote from: jammindude on November 26, 2020, 11:53:01 AM
Hot take - I really REALLY love Between You and Me, but the remix is even better.

Is that from the Remixomatosis release? I actually really like that album, especially the two versions of Map of the World and Fruit of the Wild Rose (an underrated Marillion track altogether).

It's the Mark Kelly remix, but I don't know what release it's from. It was shared with me by someone here at least 10 years ago (it's been so long, but I want to say it was romdrums??) and I immediately fell in love with it.

https://youtu.be/bu0OEsWbeuI

That's something different. Not sure I'd heard this one before, but I do like how it removed the "Monday, Tuesday, blow a fuse day" section altogether.

jammindude

And I adore the happy acoustic intro!

ytserush

Quote from: Stadler on November 26, 2020, 10:12:21 AM
Quote from: HOF on November 24, 2020, 03:13:01 PM
So I've been listening to this Marillion fan podcast, which is fairly well done and informative (and the hosts have outrageously great accents).

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/between-you-and-me-a-podcast-about-marillion/id1530960617?i=1000499894589

They're going through the Marillion catalog chronologically to discuss the history of the band. This week's episode was about the transition to Steve Hogarth as singer. It's interesting to hear the perspective from a long time fan who lived the Fish to H transition. I've always been aware of how jarring the transition was for many fans, but having come to Marillion around 2001/2002 and starting with Season's End, I obviously didn't experience that myself.

In particular, he talked about the shock of hearing Hooks in You as the lead single for the first time and thinking the band had gone party rock/metal. But then when he heard the B-side, After Me, he realized everything was going to be OK.

I remember thinking Hooks in You was a total throw away radio track the first time I heard it too. But I've grown to like it as a pretty unique episode in the band's history. Certainly it's the meatiest lead guitar effort of Rothery's career. It's fun but stupid and that's ok. What I also find interesting though is it's essentially a paired down and amped up re-write of Incommunicado. Less widdly widdly Mark Kelly and more pumped up Steve Rothery.

Listening to the album again and thinking about it, I just find the whole thing a little comical, because the end result stands out like a sore thumb from the rest of the album, and it's not representative of a new direction for the band at all. Kind of a head fake, since I think as a whole Season's End was kind of a perfect bridge from Fish to H in the end. Curious if anyone else around here was a fan then and had a similar experience.

I haven't listened to that podcast yet, but I'm that guy.  I got into Marillion with Misplaced Childhood, in real time.  I loved Clutching At Straws from minute one, and it's been my favorite Marillion album since.    FOR ME, I didn't hear the single first.  I heard the album, and so it was "King Of Sunset Town" and I was hooked from minute one.  It SOUNDED like CAS, and while it's not as good as CAS, it wasn't as radically different as Fish's solo record.   The problem for me was always viewing Hogarth/Helmer's lyrics through the lens of the VERY autobiographical Fish.  Was Hogarth the King?  What did that mean?    Hooks In You was just "Incommunicado, Part II" so there was no problem there.   The Space... was suitably deep, as was The Uninvited Guest.   They lost me with the preachy Season's End, and I felt - and I know this is weird - defensive and jealous about Berlin. Berlin was FISH'S city, bitches.   Where Marillion broke my heart was with Holiday's In Eden, where I realized - quickly - that everything WASN'T going to be ok.

My heart was broken with Brave and most of Afraid of Sunlight. Had no problem until that point or since then.

As far as the Hogarth podcast: I dabbled a bit just after it started but it really didn't hold my attention. I've been hooked on Fish on Friday though since it started back in March and I'll really be bummed when he stops. I'm familiar with a lot of the stories but he goes into more detail and there's been some that I didn't know. It's always been a dream of mine for him to do a spoken word thing and what he's been doing has been awesome for me.

ytserush

Quote from: Stadler on November 26, 2020, 10:47:14 AM
Well, let me be clear:  I like not love Hogarth.  I love his voice, I think he's an AMAZING front man, but I find him tiresome at times, and preachy.   I don't need Marillion to be "prog" - some of their best work isn't - but I do need them to be... vulnerable, for lack of a better word.   At times Hogarth can be a shade too sanctimonious, and a shade too ready to be different just for the sake of being different.   That was Holidays for me.   I love Brave, and, even though it took me a while I love Afraid of Sunlight too, but This Strange Engine turned me off to Marillion until Marbles (ironic, because TSE is supposed to be Hogarth's most personal work up to that time). 


That was kind of my problem with Hogarth (live) until about This Strange Engine where he seemed mellow out a bit on that front.

ytserush

Quote from: HOF on November 26, 2020, 11:51:10 AM
Quote from: jammindude on November 26, 2020, 11:06:24 AM
Anoraknophobia was the album that solidified my permanent status as a Marillion fan. That album is completely front to back solid. In fact, I suppose that's what makes their more recent work more disappointing to me. Because, other than the 2-disc Marbles, Anorak was the last "all killer no filler" album they did. And it's been 20 years.

We're all different. Anorak is fine, and at times I've been really into it. But I think Sounds that Can't Be Made and FEAR are excellent albums and ones I prefer to Anorak. I really think FEAR is up there in terms of the bands stronger albums. It's gotten a lot of praise but also some flack, and I'm not sure if that's because expectations are high or what. I feel like it's a classic Marillion album and has some really powerful material. I can see if some people are turned off by the political content I guess, but musically I think it is great.

FEAR is flat out amazing on all fronts especially live.

HOF

I learned something new about an old, familiar Marillion song last night. One of those things you almost have to look for to hear I'd imagine.

Was poking around the useful "explanation of song elements" Marillion fan website, and learned that at the start of Holloway Girl, "you can just make out a voice saying "Hold on. Believe on.""

http://marillionations.blogspot.com/1989/09/holloway-girl.html?m=1

Well, I checked it out with headphones and sure enough at 9 seconds in you can hear H (I imagine) sort of whisper this. Had never picked up on it before and it's almost creepy once you hear it for the first time. Like a ghost whispering in your ear.

HOF

#1419
I don't know if anyone else has checked out this Mark Kelly's Marathon album, but it's worth at least checking out the track "Puppets," which features a memorable performance by Steve Rothery. I'm pleasantly surprised by the album on the whole even if some of the songwriting is a little clunky in places. It's more or less standard neo-prog, but it's well performed and goes some places Marillion doesn't. Mark put together a solid group of players, and there are a few trademark Mark Kelly keyboard sections if that's your thing. I appreciate that it's a snappy 43 minutes or so and doesn't overstay it's welcome. It's an easy listen and you can get it for like $9 on Amazon right now.

MinistroRaven


HOF

Kind of kicking myself because Hogarth did a livestream H Natural concert this weekend that I was kind of on the fence about paying for and waited too long to decide to buy a ticket (was hoping it would be available after the fact, but it closed before the concert). The set list looks amazing and some of the pictures I saw posted on the Facebook group looked really great too. As of now there are no plans for a broader release, but it sounds like Lucy will try to talk him into releasing something.

ytserush

I watched Fish on Friday for the first time live yesterday. The rest of the time I caught it a day or two later.  I can't believe he's been letting us into his home for two hours every week and just chats and answers questions. I even got the T-shirt that has the date and location of every show he's done and where in his house he broadcasted from that day. Have to figure he might be hung over next Friday, but we'll see.

HOF

Video update on the new album. Sounds like the big hold up now is that Rothery isn't coming to the studio due to COVID concerns so they can't finish arranging the songs they've chosen to work on for the album, but the rest of the band are still jamming and working on bits in the studio. Rothery updated separately on Facebook and said he hopes to be vaccinated in the next month or so, so I'd guess they should be able to finish things up by this summer but they aren't sure if it will be ready in time to play new songs on the fall tour (if that even happens).

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Qg2rc8-vV3U&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0JF_F0VdXQo2YfOCEZnWwEvWey5LEKfYDSj1Juzocegnu5dxCLmWGuxJE

Man, it really struck me watching this that these guys are getting older. Mark and Ian especially (Pete is ageless and I think H just hides his age relatively well). It's good that they are still jamming on new ideas while waiting for Rothery, because I kind of worry this might be their last album. Certainly if they take 5 years again to follow this one up they'd all be pushing their late 60s. But maybe they'll have enough extra jams to work with that they can do at least one more after this one.

Stadler

Mosley is older, though; he's 67.  I think Hogarth is 64, Rothery and Trewavas are 61 or 62, and Kelly is 59 or 60.

I kind of always remember Mosley is "five years older", and I thought there was two years between Rothery/Trewavas and Kelly.  (Fish is the same age as Rothery/Trewavas, more or less).

HOF

Quote from: Stadler on February 10, 2021, 06:29:52 AM
Mosley is older, though; he's 67.  I think Hogarth is 64, Rothery and Trewavas are 61 or 62, and Kelly is 59 or 60.

I kind of always remember Mosley is "five years older", and I thought there was two years between Rothery/Trewavas and Kelly.  (Fish is the same age as Rothery/Trewavas, more or less).

Yeah, I knew Mosely was the oldest but wasn't sure how much older. Mark has always looked younger than the others despite no hair, so he kind of took me aback on this video. H recently confirmed he's older than was previously reported (when he joined Marillion their manager put out a release saying he was younger than he was and it stuck for a long time), but I think 64 is the right age now (65 in May).

Stadler

How whack is it that that (Kelly's age) is what makes me watch the video?   :)

HOF

#1427
Well here's something I've never seen before. A full concert video of Marillion live in Milwaukee in 1997.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Etlzf5oFWSQ

That's John Wesley playing some guitar on Estonia (and maybe elsewhere, haven't watched the whole thing). H, those pants! 1997 Pete with short hair and sunglasses. Mark belting out the background vocals. Fun to see the boys in their relative youth after that video this morning.

I never thought of them as similar before, but H (both vocally and in his looks/mannerisms) reminds me a lot of a young, early Genesis Peter Gabriel here.

ytserush

Quote from: HOF on February 10, 2021, 06:17:45 AM
Video update on the new album. Sounds like the big hold up now is that Rothery isn't coming to the studio due to COVID concerns so they can't finish arranging the songs they've chosen to work on for the album, but the rest of the band are still jamming and working on bits in the studio. Rothery updated separately on Facebook and said he hopes to be vaccinated in the next month or so, so I'd guess they should be able to finish things up by this summer but they aren't sure if it will be ready in time to play new songs on the fall tour (if that even happens).

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Qg2rc8-vV3U&feature=youtu.be&fbclid=IwAR0JF_F0VdXQo2YfOCEZnWwEvWey5LEKfYDSj1Juzocegnu5dxCLmWGuxJE

Man, it really struck me watching this that these guys are getting older. Mark and Ian especially (Pete is ageless and I think H just hides his age relatively well). It's good that they are still jamming on new ideas while waiting for Rothery, because I kind of worry this might be their last album. Certainly if they take 5 years again to follow this one up they'd all be pushing their late 60s. But maybe they'll have enough extra jams to work with that they can do at least one more after this one.

I did notice that the tempo slowed when I last saw them in November 2016, but it wasn't quite as drastic as the subsequent live releases but that may have something to do with the setlist choices.  But yeah, after 2016 I wondered how long they want to keep at it. Covid seems to be making a lot of the decisions these days. I still can't see myself at a show for at least another year and I have no idea what that would even look like.    I'm probably more excited about a Rothery solo album as this point, but I'm in on the next Marillion album although I'd want to continue to keep my name out of it on the slight chance I won't like it. (which hasn't happened yet.)

ytserush

Quote from: HOF on February 10, 2021, 08:25:38 PM
Well here's something I've never seen before. A full concert video of Marillion live in Milwaukee in 1997.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Etlzf5oFWSQ

That's John Wesley playing some guitar on Estonia (and maybe elsewhere, haven't watched the whole thing). H, those pants! 1997 Pete with short hair and sunglasses. Mark belting out the background vocals. Fun to see the boys in their relative youth after that video this morning.

I never thought of them as similar before, but H (both vocally and in his looks/mannerisms) reminds me a lot of a young, early Genesis Peter Gabriel here.

Think I have this video somewhere.  This was the tour I got back into seeming them live after really liking This Strange Engine after opting not to see the previous tour.

You'd like the Season's End Tour where Hogarth would scale the audio cabinets.

romdrums

Quote from: ytserush on February 13, 2021, 05:40:44 PM
Quote from: HOF on February 10, 2021, 08:25:38 PM
Well here's something I've never seen before. A full concert video of Marillion live in Milwaukee in 1997.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Etlzf5oFWSQ

That's John Wesley playing some guitar on Estonia (and maybe elsewhere, haven't watched the whole thing). H, those pants! 1997 Pete with short hair and sunglasses. Mark belting out the background vocals. Fun to see the boys in their relative youth after that video this morning.

I never thought of them as similar before, but H (both vocally and in his looks/mannerisms) reminds me a lot of a young, early Genesis Peter Gabriel here.

Think I have this video somewhere.  This was the tour I got back into seeming them live after really liking This Strange Engine after opting not to see the previous tour.

You'd like the Season's End Tour where Hogarth would scale the audio cabinets.

This was probably peak Marillion fandom for me.  I saw them three times on that tour (Cleveland, Grand Rapids, and Chicago).  Milwaukee was the show in between Cleveland and Grand Rapids if I remember.  Set list in Cleveland was the same as in Milwaukee.  Got to see them do White Russian at the GR show, along with Seasons End.  I also remember, during the Chicago show, that Mark Kelly's keyboard rig died during the second chorus of King, where he went to play the synth line and got nothing.  So, H just started playing the guitar riff, the band joined in, and they were able to jam long enough to let Mark get his rig going again.  Mark played that lead line with authority when they got back to that part again, as well as the electric piano part under the "message of love" section.  Funny thing is, I haven't had a chance to see them live since. 

HOF

Quote from: romdrums on February 13, 2021, 06:38:43 PM
Quote from: ytserush on February 13, 2021, 05:40:44 PM
Quote from: HOF on February 10, 2021, 08:25:38 PM
Well here's something I've never seen before. A full concert video of Marillion live in Milwaukee in 1997.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Etlzf5oFWSQ

That's John Wesley playing some guitar on Estonia (and maybe elsewhere, haven't watched the whole thing). H, those pants! 1997 Pete with short hair and sunglasses. Mark belting out the background vocals. Fun to see the boys in their relative youth after that video this morning.

I never thought of them as similar before, but H (both vocally and in his looks/mannerisms) reminds me a lot of a young, early Genesis Peter Gabriel here.

Think I have this video somewhere.  This was the tour I got back into seeming them live after really liking This Strange Engine after opting not to see the previous tour.

You'd like the Season's End Tour where Hogarth would scale the audio cabinets.

This was probably peak Marillion fandom for me.  I saw them three times on that tour (Cleveland, Grand Rapids, and Chicago).  Milwaukee was the show in between Cleveland and Grand Rapids if I remember.  Set list in Cleveland was the same as in Milwaukee.  Got to see them do White Russian at the GR show, along with Seasons End.  I also remember, during the Chicago show, that Mark Kelly's keyboard rig died during the second chorus of King, where he went to play the synth line and got nothing.  So, H just started playing the guitar riff, the band joined in, and they were able to jam long enough to let Mark get his rig going again.  Mark played that lead line with authority when they got back to that part again, as well as the electric piano part under the "message of love" section.  Funny thing is, I haven't had a chance to see them live since.

Mark's rig crashes are legendary. They were a frequent occurrence back in the day for whatever reason.

SoundscapeMN

logically, the Milwaukee show in 1997 would have been my 1st show, but I hardly could afford driving down to Milwaukee all by myself at that time, just newly hired Best Buy employee. I don't think I even knew the tour per I wasn't online much then and I wasn't as big of a fan of Marillion yet in September 1997.

Stadler

Quote from: ytserush on February 13, 2021, 05:40:44 PM
Quote from: HOF on February 10, 2021, 08:25:38 PM
Well here's something I've never seen before. A full concert video of Marillion live in Milwaukee in 1997.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Etlzf5oFWSQ

That's John Wesley playing some guitar on Estonia (and maybe elsewhere, haven't watched the whole thing). H, those pants! 1997 Pete with short hair and sunglasses. Mark belting out the background vocals. Fun to see the boys in their relative youth after that video this morning.

I never thought of them as similar before, but H (both vocally and in his looks/mannerisms) reminds me a lot of a young, early Genesis Peter Gabriel here.

Think I have this video somewhere.  This was the tour I got back into seeming them live after really liking This Strange Engine after opting not to see the previous tour.

You'd like the Season's End Tour where Hogarth would scale the audio cabinets.

I saw that Season's End tour; GREAT show in a small club (Toad's Place).  Loved it.  For various reasons that might be the best show I've seen by them (personally, not video).

ytserush

Quote from: Stadler on February 14, 2021, 07:09:15 AM
Quote from: ytserush on February 13, 2021, 05:40:44 PM
Quote from: HOF on February 10, 2021, 08:25:38 PM
Well here's something I've never seen before. A full concert video of Marillion live in Milwaukee in 1997.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Etlzf5oFWSQ

That's John Wesley playing some guitar on Estonia (and maybe elsewhere, haven't watched the whole thing). H, those pants! 1997 Pete with short hair and sunglasses. Mark belting out the background vocals. Fun to see the boys in their relative youth after that video this morning.

I never thought of them as similar before, but H (both vocally and in his looks/mannerisms) reminds me a lot of a young, early Genesis Peter Gabriel here.

Think I have this video somewhere.  This was the tour I got back into seeming them live after really liking This Strange Engine after opting not to see the previous tour.

You'd like the Season's End Tour where Hogarth would scale the audio cabinets.

I saw that Season's End tour; GREAT show in a small club (Toad's Place).  Loved it.  For various reasons that might be the best show I've seen by them (personally, not video).

I saw 3 shows on that tour and likely would have hauled it up to Toad's Place if Rush hadn't been on the road at the same time. Priorities.