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Offline Dream Team

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The Legacy of DT's drummers
« on: November 11, 2021, 07:08:04 AM »
Could expand this topic to include the other instrumentalists I suppose; but I had this thought last night while listening to some crazy MM shenanigans: what other band could you name that has 15 albums or more worth of amazing drumming that could equal or surpass what DT have had in Portnoy & Mangini?

I'm sure Rush will be quickly mentioned by somebody, but I'm not sure who else could seriously be considered. Peart, for a lot of those albums in the middle, played it pretty safe.

I'm sure people will have different criteria for what they consider amazing, but anyone thought I'd kick it off.

Offline Kotowboy

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2021, 07:20:53 AM »
.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2021, 09:49:42 AM by Kotowboy »

Offline JediKnight1969

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #2 on: November 11, 2021, 02:22:28 PM »
I'd say Tony Macalpine

His drummers along time:

Steve Smith
Tommy Aldridge
Atma Anur
Deen Castronovo
Mike Terrana
Glen Sobel
Dennis Chambers
Virgil Donati
Marco Minnemann
Aquiles Priester

All monsters
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Offline lovethedrake

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #3 on: November 11, 2021, 02:25:48 PM »
Could expand this topic to include the other instrumentalists I suppose; but I had this thought last night while listening to some crazy MM shenanigans: what other band could you name that has 15 albums or more worth of amazing drumming that could equal or surpass what DT have had in Portnoy & Mangini?

I'm sure Rush will be quickly mentioned by somebody, but I'm not sure who else could seriously be considered. Peart, for a lot of those albums in the middle, played it pretty safe.

I'm sure people will have different criteria for what they consider amazing, but anyone thought I'd kick it off.

Well Phil Collins is probably my favorite drummer but he didnít quite have 15 with Genesis. 

I think he had 12 though from Nursery Chryme to We Cant Dance (worst album name ever but has some great songs) and they all had amazing drumming which is pretty darn good.

Offline pg1067

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #4 on: November 11, 2021, 02:45:59 PM »
Frankly, there aren't a lot of bands who have 15 studio albums.  A band like U2, which released its first album nearly a decade before DT, only has 14.


I'm sure Rush will be quickly mentioned by somebody, but I'm not sure who else could seriously be considered. Peart, for a lot of those albums in the middle, played it pretty safe.

"Albums in the middle"?  Rush released 19 studio albums, so the "middle" would be roughly albums 7-13, which would be Permanent Waves, Moving Pictures, Signals, Grace Under Pressure, Power Windows, Hold Your Fire and Presto.  And you think Peart "played it pretty safe" on "a lot of those albums"?

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Offline gzarruk

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #5 on: November 11, 2021, 03:04:41 PM »
To answer to the OP: not many bands come to mind, but a couple examples could be King Crimson (and their BIG bunch of drummers) and maybe Fates Warning, though neither have as many albums as DT.
It sounds like, "ruk, ruk, ruk, ruk, ruk." Instead of the more pleasing kick drum sound of, "gzarruk, gzarruk, gzarruk, gzarruk."

Offline TheBarstoolWarrior

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2021, 04:14:08 PM »
The answer I think is that there aren't many. I get the Rush comparison. Peart was a great-- though not technical-- and very creative drummer for so long.

The Tony Macalpine observation is interesting. He certainly has had some amazing drummers. How about Frank Zappa?

Offline KevShmev

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2021, 07:14:39 PM »
Frankly, there aren't a lot of bands who have 15 studio albums.  A band like U2, which released its first album nearly a decade before DT, only has 14.


I'm sure Rush will be quickly mentioned by somebody, but I'm not sure who else could seriously be considered. Peart, for a lot of those albums in the middle, played it pretty safe.

"Albums in the middle"?  Rush released 19 studio albums, so the "middle" would be roughly albums 7-13, which would be Permanent Waves, Moving Pictures, Signals, Grace Under Pressure, Power Windows, Hold Your Fire and Presto.  And you think Peart "played it pretty safe" on "a lot of those albums"?

 :rollin :rollin

Yeah, that made me laugh as well. :lol

And it is true that most bands never get to 15 studio albums, so it is hard to find too many examples here.  Like you said, even U2 only has 14, and besides I would never describe Larry Mullen's drumming as amazing.

Some might Yes, with the combo of Bill Bruford and then Alan White, but despite being a big Yes fan, I have rarely been wowed by White's drumming (he is good, but rarely strikes me as great).

Offline nikatapi

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2021, 01:18:28 AM »
Yeah hard to find something on the top of my mind. Mangini brought a breath of fresh air in terms of ideas, since MP had become a bit predictable after Octavarium i think.
It took at least 3 studio albums to find a decent sound for him, but especially on AVFTTOTW if feel his style is best represented with great production (and stereo separation which is important due to the way he plays the cymbals)

Offline erwinrafael

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2021, 02:04:16 AM »
Some might Yes, with the combo of Bill Bruford and then Alan White, but despite being a big Yes fan, I have rarely been wowed by White's drumming (he is good, but rarely strikes me as great).

I am the weird one who preferred Alan White's approach to Bruford. He brought a certain heaviness to the band. Still love his drumming in Endless Dream.

Offline Kotowboy

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2021, 02:38:12 AM »
Weirdly I really like the OTHER Alan White from oasis.

Basically a jazz drummer playing 4/4 rock n roll. Probably the easiest job in the band. I love his playing and he makes it look so easy - which of course it should be.

I'm not into drummers who look like they're an octopus having an electric shock with a face like they're in terrible pain.

Taylor Hawkins is great too but he's a BIT like that. He tends to wave his arms around and looks like every snare hit causes him pain. ;D

Offline Fritzinger

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2021, 04:29:14 AM »
Phil Collins' drumming was constantly great on all 12 Genesis albums he played on.

Alan White was very good in the 70s when the band was bursting with energy. Though never as technically versatile as Bru, it sounded like he played for his life. Yessongs, holy cow. After Drama, his playing became more stale and boring, but still okay (I agree on the great performance on Endless Dream though). But on Heaven & Earth I would actually consider his playing bad. I rarely say this about musicians who just have fun doing what they do, but I think it might be time to go into his well-deserved retirement.

Crimso have been mentioned. I think, here it is important to consider the LIVE-band King Crimson because they never defined themselves purely through their studio albums. And their drummers were consistently great. Bruford, Mastelotto, Harrison and not to forget the great Michael McDonald.

I don't think Neil Peart played it safe on Rush's albums in the middle. He experimented with electronic stuff and new sounds. Just because he doesn't go berserk 24/7, doesn't mean he's playing it safe. He was playing virtuosically but still serving the song.
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Offline Stadler

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2021, 09:26:23 AM »
For me, my drumming Mt. Rushmore is Bonham, Collins, Peart, and Portnoy.   So them bands.   :) 

Offline svisser

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2021, 10:17:18 AM »
Zappa. Amazing drumming throughout the entire discography
Blink 182. Like it or not, Barker is a solid as hell drummer with an instantly recognizable sound.
Red Hot Chili Peppers. Same reason as Blink
Literally every single Buddy Rich album.
Deep Purple Can never go wrong with Paice.

I know Blink and RHCP don't have many albums, but their sound spans an entire generation (and beyond).
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Offline Architeuthis

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2021, 02:51:44 PM »
Some might Yes, with the combo of Bill Bruford and then Alan White, but despite being a big Yes fan, I have rarely been wowed by White's drumming (he is good, but rarely strikes me as great).

I am the weird one who preferred Alan White's approach to Bruford. He brought a certain heaviness to the band. Still love his drumming in Endless Dream.
I'm totally with you on this.  Alan White is excellent on 90125 up to TALK, especially Endless Dream. The kick drum sound is kind of odd sounding on Talk, but oddly enough it works.  He was also really good on The Ladder.
The thing about Alan White,  he really brought it live especially on the Talk Tour. I've seen Yes a few times since then and he still rocked it pretty good.
Bruford was really good too with more of a jazzy/fusion style and maybe more technical .  Both drummers in Yes are great, but I prefer White's approach.
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Online TheCountOfNYC

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2021, 05:52:27 PM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.
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Offline Dream Team

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2021, 07:18:04 PM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Ooh nice analogy! Very different but both great.

Offline KevShmev

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2021, 07:41:30 PM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Yeah, but Rush with Neil Peart was like Tom Brady in New England (6 rings vs 2 for Favre and Rodgers combined). ;)  The combo of Portnoy and Mangini is damn good, but there is only one Professor.  :hat :hat

Offline Dream Team

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #18 on: November 13, 2021, 09:06:35 AM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Yeah, but Rush with Neil Peart was like Tom Brady in New England (6 rings vs 2 for Favre and Rodgers combined). ;)  The combo of Portnoy and Mangini is damn good, but there is only one Professor.  :hat :hat

Hmmm. At least those guys did all the drumming and didn't leave the stage half the time for a defense to take over to earn those accolades!  :)

Online TheCountOfNYC

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2021, 09:35:58 AM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Yeah, but Rush with Neil Peart was like Tom Brady in New England (6 rings vs 2 for Favre and Rodgers combined). ;)  The combo of Portnoy and Mangini is damn good, but there is only one Professor.  :hat :hat

Hmmm. At least those guys did all the drumming and didn't leave the stage half the time for a defense to take over to earn those accolades!  :)

Geddy Lee=Bill Belichick
Neil Peart=Tom Brady
Alex Lifeson=Adam Vinatieri
John Rutsey=Drew Bledsoe
People figured out that the white thing that comes out of cows' titties could be drunk, and the relation between sweet desires and women's bellies growing up for 9 months. It can't be THAT hard to figure out how a trumpet works.Ē

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Offline Stadler

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2021, 11:42:03 AM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Yeah, but Rush with Neil Peart was like Tom Brady in New England (6 rings vs 2 for Favre and Rodgers combined). ;)  The combo of Portnoy and Mangini is damn good, but there is only one Professor.  :hat :hat

Hmmm. At least those guys did all the drumming and didn't leave the stage half the time for a defense to take over to earn those accolades!  :)

Geddy Lee=Bill Belichick
Neil Peart=Tom Brady
Alex Lifeson=Adam Vinatieri
John Rutsey=Drew Bledsoe

So who is the Patrick Mahomes in that scenario?  You know, the guy that played on one album and is better than Geddy, Neil, Alex and John combined?   

Online TheCountOfNYC

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2021, 11:17:30 AM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Yeah, but Rush with Neil Peart was like Tom Brady in New England (6 rings vs 2 for Favre and Rodgers combined). ;)  The combo of Portnoy and Mangini is damn good, but there is only one Professor.  :hat :hat

Hmmm. At least those guys did all the drumming and didn't leave the stage half the time for a defense to take over to earn those accolades!  :)

Geddy Lee=Bill Belichick
Neil Peart=Tom Brady
Alex Lifeson=Adam Vinatieri
John Rutsey=Drew Bledsoe

So who is the Patrick Mahomes in that scenario?  You know, the guy that played on one album and is better than Geddy, Neil, Alex and John combined?

Dude, your hate for Patrick Mahomes is getting a little out of hand. And believe me I understand where youíre coming from as someone who spent years discrediting everything that Tom Brady accomplished, but there was no mention of Mahomes in this thread until you brought it up.
People figured out that the white thing that comes out of cows' titties could be drunk, and the relation between sweet desires and women's bellies growing up for 9 months. It can't be THAT hard to figure out how a trumpet works.Ē

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2021, 11:45:12 AM »
Could expand this topic to include the other instrumentalists I suppose; but I had this thought last night while listening to some crazy MM shenanigans: what other band could you name that has 15 albums or more worth of amazing drumming that could equal or surpass what DT have had in Portnoy & Mangini?

I'm sure Rush will be quickly mentioned by somebody, but I'm not sure who else could seriously be considered. Peart, for a lot of those albums in the middle, played it pretty safe.

I'm sure people will have different criteria for what they consider amazing, but anyone thought I'd kick it off.

Kind of depends on what you want to hear, but I'm pretty sure there's session drummers and jazz drummers out there who have played on more albums than Mike & Mike (combined) have. Not (progressive) metal, but impressive nonetheless. One name that comes to mind is Art Blakey. 76 albums leading the Jazz Messengers is not a mean feat.
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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2021, 11:53:15 AM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.


Yeah, but Rush with Neil Peart was like Tom Brady in New England (6 rings vs 2 for Favre and Rodgers combined). ;)  The combo of Portnoy and Mangini is damn good, but there is only one Professor.  :hat :hat

Hmmm. At least those guys did all the drumming and didn't leave the stage half the time for a defense to take over to earn those accolades!  :)

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Offline Stadler

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #24 on: November 17, 2021, 12:28:41 PM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Yeah, but Rush with Neil Peart was like Tom Brady in New England (6 rings vs 2 for Favre and Rodgers combined). ;)  The combo of Portnoy and Mangini is damn good, but there is only one Professor.  :hat :hat

Hmmm. At least those guys did all the drumming and didn't leave the stage half the time for a defense to take over to earn those accolades!  :)

Geddy Lee=Bill Belichick
Neil Peart=Tom Brady
Alex Lifeson=Adam Vinatieri
John Rutsey=Drew Bledsoe

So who is the Patrick Mahomes in that scenario?  You know, the guy that played on one album and is better than Geddy, Neil, Alex and John combined?

Dude, your hate for Patrick Mahomes is getting a little out of hand. And believe me I understand where youíre coming from as someone who spent years discrediting everything that Tom Brady accomplished, but there was no mention of Mahomes in this thread until you brought it up.

Oh, it's nothing like that.  I was responding to the dig at Brady from one post previous, not yours.   I actually don't hate Mahomes at all; he's a very good player who one day may be one of the greats.   That pales in comparison to Dream Team's contempt for Brady; I don't think he would piss on Brady if he was on fire.  :)

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #25 on: November 17, 2021, 02:04:46 PM »
As mentioned by others in this thread, there are a few bands with a history of great drummers, but none of them compare to what Dream Theater has had throughout their career. Mike Portnoy has reached the level of being considered one of the all time greats, and while Mike Mangini isnít as well known of a name outside of the drum community, his legacy within the drum community is that of a legend. Both Mikes are absolutely incredible drummers and musicians, and any band would be lucky to have a drummer of their caliber, and Dream Theater has been fortunate enough to have them both.

For a sports analogy, Dream Theater are like the Packers, who went right from Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre to future Hall of Fame quarterback Aaron Rodgers.

Yeah, but Rush with Neil Peart was like Tom Brady in New England (6 rings vs 2 for Favre and Rodgers combined). ;)  The combo of Portnoy and Mangini is damn good, but there is only one Professor.  :hat :hat

Hmmm. At least those guys did all the drumming and didn't leave the stage half the time for a defense to take over to earn those accolades!  :)

Geddy Lee=Bill Belichick
Neil Peart=Tom Brady
Alex Lifeson=Adam Vinatieri
John Rutsey=Drew Bledsoe

So who is the Patrick Mahomes in that scenario?  You know, the guy that played on one album and is better than Geddy, Neil, Alex and John combined?

Dude, your hate for Patrick Mahomes is getting a little out of hand. And believe me I understand where youíre coming from as someone who spent years discrediting everything that Tom Brady accomplished, but there was no mention of Mahomes in this thread until you brought it up.

Oh, it's nothing like that.  I was responding to the dig at Brady from one post previous, not yours.   I actually don't hate Mahomes at all; he's a very good player who one day may be one of the greats.   That pales in comparison to Dream Team's contempt for Brady; I don't think he would piss on Brady if he was on fire.  :)

Thatís fair. And at this point can we stop acting like Brady was carried to seven titles? I loathe the man with every fiber of my being, but his accomplishments speak for themselves, and he has had continued success no matter what players or coaches are around him, with Brady being the only common denominator.

And back on topic, Mike and Mike are incredible drummers.
People figured out that the white thing that comes out of cows' titties could be drunk, and the relation between sweet desires and women's bellies growing up for 9 months. It can't be THAT hard to figure out how a trumpet works.Ē

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Offline Fritzinger

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #26 on: November 19, 2021, 02:09:25 AM »
And back on topic

Good, because as a German I have no idea what you all were talking about in your last posts  :lol
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Offline DragonAttack

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #27 on: November 23, 2021, 04:06:28 PM »
Since they qualify for the 15 studio release requirement, I'd list Roger Taylor of Queen.

Granted, he got lazy in the 80s with the programmed drums.  In the 70s, he had to do most of the BVs on tour (as well as the occasional LV).  His drumming on Queen II (specifically 'Father To Son) and the LPs  'A Night at the Opera', 'A Day at the Races', and 'News of the World' was just so spot on.  As to 'Sheer Heart Attack', especially for 'Brighton Rock' and 'Stone Cold Crazy', as well as 'Killer Queen' and all other tracks, his solos and fills were aces.

No idea why he laid back so much on his solo releases, other than songs such as 'Let's Get Crazy', 'Man On Fire', and a few others.
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Offline darkshade

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Re: The Legacy of DT's drummers
« Reply #28 on: November 25, 2021, 08:47:36 AM »
Zappa. Amazing drumming throughout the entire discography

I don't know about the entire discography. Anything from 1970 on, sure. Ansley, Ralph, Ruth, Chester, Bozzio, Vinnie, Logeman, Chad. All amazing drummers. Even the Hot Rats drummers were pretty great.
I wouldn't call Jimmy Carl Black an amazing drummer.