Author Topic: The filming of our lives...  (Read 1954 times)

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Online MirrorMask

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #105 on: March 08, 2018, 09:50:55 AM »
Anthropologist circa 2088:   "Why are all those women taking pictures of their phone in the mirror?  They must really like their phones."

"And why they do it with a duck face?"
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Offline TempusVox

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #106 on: March 08, 2018, 09:14:33 PM »
Anthropologist circa 2088:   "Why are all those women taking pictures of their phone in the mirror?  They must really like their phones."

"And why they do it with a duck face?"

Nah...by 2088 all babies will be whisked at birth to surgery to give them all duck faces, permanently. Society will be like this...

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Offline Chino

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #107 on: March 09, 2018, 07:45:11 AM »

Offline gmillerdrake

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #108 on: March 09, 2018, 08:10:15 AM »
^^^^ that'd be funny if it weren't so true and sad.
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Online mikeyd23

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #109 on: March 09, 2018, 08:22:14 AM »
^ Very true!

On a serious note, I need to show that to my wife. She's got this habit of going on social media and seeing those (often fake) momentary highlights of people's lives and comparing that to her life. Especially people with their kids. She'll have a rough day with our toddler and then see someone's perfectly staged capture of a great moment with their kid and start to feel like she's not doing a good job.

She fully knows and understands these snapshots are not people's true lives, but it still effects her.

Offline gmillerdrake

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #110 on: March 09, 2018, 08:25:45 AM »
She'll have a rough day with our toddler and then see someone's perfectly staged capture of a great moment with their kid and start to feel like she's not doing a good job.

She fully knows and understands these snapshots are not people's true lives, but it still effects her.

It's amazing how it still affects 'us' when everyone knows it's not 'real life'. It's all staged....."best of" moments that rarely have a genuine sentiment involved. Yet, you can find yourself comparing your life to the filtered...unnatural moments that are posted for all to see. 
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Online mikeyd23

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #111 on: March 09, 2018, 08:31:38 AM »
It's amazing how it still affects 'us' when everyone knows it's not 'real life'. It's all staged....."best of" moments that rarely have a genuine sentiment involved. Yet, you can find yourself comparing your life to the filtered...unnatural moments that are posted for all to see.

Yup, no doubt.

Offline Implode

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #112 on: March 09, 2018, 08:31:59 AM »
Where do you guys draw the line between recording being bad because you should be living in the moment and recording being good to help remember the moment or create something interesting? There's a line somewhere, but at the moment I can't really place it.

For example, while maybe I'll record like a 10 second clip of my friend's favorite song to send them via snapchat at a concert with my phone held close to my chest, I'm not really a fan of recording shows. It doesn't take away my experience really, but in the end I find that I never go back and watch the videos. And even if I wanted to, I'm sure I could find a way better recording of the same show on youtube.

But on the other hand, I make vlogs of every convention I go to, so I'm recording the antics my friends and I get into all the time because I enjoy sharing the moments with an audience, but I also enjoy video/vlog making as a hobby and such.

Offline Chino

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #113 on: March 09, 2018, 08:36:35 AM »
Where do you guys draw the line between recording being bad because you should be living in the moment and recording being good to help remember the moment or create something interesting? There's a line somewhere, but at the moment I can't really place it.

For example, while maybe I'll record like a 10 second clip of my friend's favorite song to send them via snapchat at a concert with my phone held close to my chest, I'm not really a fan of recording shows. It doesn't take away my experience really, but in the end I find that I never go back and watch the videos. And even if I wanted to, I'm sure I could find a way better recording of the same show on youtube.

But on the other hand, I make vlogs of every convention I go to, so I'm recording the antics my friends and I get into all the time because I enjoy sharing the moments with an audience, but I also enjoy video/vlog making as a hobby and such.

I draw the line with @Lizess on Instagram. She's the sister of someone I grew up with. She's a professional social media whore whose entire life seems to revolve around the positive reinforcement provided by others. Follow her for just a few days and you'll see exactly what I mean.

Offline Stadler

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #114 on: March 09, 2018, 09:08:18 AM »
Where do you guys draw the line between recording being bad because you should be living in the moment and recording being good to help remember the moment or create something interesting? There's a line somewhere, but at the moment I can't really place it.

For example, while maybe I'll record like a 10 second clip of my friend's favorite song to send them via snapchat at a concert with my phone held close to my chest, I'm not really a fan of recording shows. It doesn't take away my experience really, but in the end I find that I never go back and watch the videos. And even if I wanted to, I'm sure I could find a way better recording of the same show on youtube.

But on the other hand, I make vlogs of every convention I go to, so I'm recording the antics my friends and I get into all the time because I enjoy sharing the moments with an audience, but I also enjoy video/vlog making as a hobby and such.

I draw the line with @Lizess on Instagram. She's the sister of someone I grew up with. She's a professional social media whore whose entire life seems to revolve around the positive reinforcement provided by others. Follow her for just a few days and you'll see exactly what I mean.

I think Chino is dancing around the line just right:  the difference is when it moves from a quick snap to document your experience, and the "snap" is an almost immeasurable portion of the experience, to when the snap IS the experience, and the documentation IS the experience.    No offense, Implode, and it may be harmless/with good intent, but I think you captured both sides of the line in your post.   "10 second snippet to give flavor"?   Cool.   "The vlog is the intent of the experience"?  Maybe not. 

Offline sylvan

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #115 on: March 09, 2018, 10:01:58 AM »
And holy shit, what is it, Steam? The video game streaming site... Is this real life? People actually sit around and watch other people play video games! I remember sitting around with more friends than controllers, and inevitably it turns into, "Stop hogging the sticks ass hole, it's my turn!" And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play video games... What a world we live in!

Whoever brought up comparing these things people do and applying it to pre-interwebz days fucking nailed it. I just couldn't imagine sitting around looking at someone's family photo album, yet people stand in line at fucking Disney World and just "like" one photo after another as they slowly shuffle forward.

Offline Phoenix87x

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #116 on: March 09, 2018, 10:09:53 AM »
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That right there is the god damn truth.

Nothing happens on the couch. There's an entire world out there of adventure and new experience just waiting to be had. And I was like that too at one point, posting stuff and just sitting there waiting for a like. At the end of the day, it was getting in the way of me living my life.
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Offline Implode

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #117 on: March 09, 2018, 10:16:44 AM »
No offense, Implode, and it may be harmless/with good intent, but I think you captured both sides of the line in your post.   "10 second snippet to give flavor"?   Cool.   "The vlog is the intent of the experience"?  Maybe not.

That's understandable. No offense taken at all. I know people place that line in completely different places, which is why I thought it'd be interesting to ask. For me, the vlogging does nothing to hinder my experiences, and it actually enhances those experiences or provides more longevity for them. My friends and I will commonly go back and watch what we documented of the various events through the years, and we love seeing/reliving those memories.

Of course at the same time, it's not like I'm recording the entire weekend. At the end of one event, I might end up having 90 minutes of raw footage over the course of 3-4 days at most to cut and sift through for the 10-20 minute vlog. Percentage-wise, that might fall under what you called an "almost immeasurable portion of the experience".

Offline Chino

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #118 on: March 09, 2018, 10:20:02 AM »
And holy shit, what is it, Steam? The video game streaming site... Is this real life? People actually sit around and watch other people play video games! I remember sitting around with more friends than controllers, and inevitably it turns into, "Stop hogging the sticks ass hole, it's my turn!" And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play video games... What a world we live in!

I remember going outside with friends and playing basketball with more people than there were positions, and it inevitably turns into "stop being court hog and let me play for a bit"! And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play basketball. What a world we live in!

I watch for several reasons;
1) I'm a cheap asshole and want to watch some real time gameplay with commentary to see what the game's like before buying it.
2) The person I'm watching is a Youtuber I genuinely enjoy watching and subscribe to, and they're doing a live stream that just so happens to feature them playing a video game at the same time.
3) Sometimes it's just cool to watch people with a skill set far beyond yours compete against one another (pro sports).

Offline Implode

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #119 on: March 09, 2018, 10:23:29 AM »
I actually just remembered something else.

Remember back in the late 80s and 90s when recording home videos really took off? Parents, or at least those I knew, seemed obsessed with recording every single moment of their children's lives: eating, walking, talking, going to Disney, sports games, etc. I'm talking hours and hours and hours of footage likely to never been seen again.

Do you think that this is less of a generational/technology driven thing, and more of a general human fascination? Like the technology is what enables us to indulge in this strange want to immortalize and capture moments of our lives. It's not just today's youth, I'd say.

Offline Implode

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #120 on: March 09, 2018, 10:28:23 AM »
And holy shit, what is it, Steam? The video game streaming site... Is this real life? People actually sit around and watch other people play video games! I remember sitting around with more friends than controllers, and inevitably it turns into, "Stop hogging the sticks ass hole, it's my turn!" And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play video games... What a world we live in!

I remember going outside with friends and playing basketball with more people than there were positions, and it inevitably turns into "stop being court hog and let me play for a bit"! And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play basketball. What a world we live in!

I watch for several reasons;
1) I'm a cheap asshole and want to watch some real time gameplay with commentary to see what the game's like before buying it.
2) The person I'm watching is a Youtuber I genuinely enjoy watching and subscribe to, and they're doing a live stream that just so happens to feature them playing a video game at the same time.
3) Sometimes it's just cool to watch people with a skill set far beyond yours compete against one another (pro sports).

Also chiming in here. The main appeals to watching YouTubers or streamers playing video games are what Chino said. With items 2 and 3, it's not even the game itself that's the main focus. It's no different than watching some talk show or something on TV with personalities you really enjoy hearing/watching. That's like telling most of America, "Hey, why do you even bother watching other people play football? Just go out and play yourselves!" Which ties into the competitive side. I also love watching people who are immensely skilled in their craft: sports, music, video games, whatever they might be, but if it's also something I work really hard to be good at, it's inspiring to see how other people are doing or how they are competing with you or other people. It's fun.

Offline Chino

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #121 on: March 09, 2018, 10:33:31 AM »
I actually just remembered something else.

Remember back in the late 80s and 90s when recording home videos really took off? Parents, or at least those I knew, seemed obsessed with recording every single moment of their children's lives: eating, walking, talking, going to Disney, sports games, etc. I'm talking hours and hours and hours of footage likely to never been seen again.

Do you think that this is less of a generational/technology driven thing, and more of a general human fascination? Like the technology is what enables us to indulge in this strange want to immortalize and capture moments of our lives. It's not just today's youth, I'd say.

Absolutely. Regardless of culture, we see degrees of this all throughout history. Would a wealthy person commissioning a portrait be a whole lot different than someone taking a selfie today? How about someone commissioning a granite statue of themselves? Cave people used to trace their hands on walls and parents hundreds of years ago were documenting the height of their children on the walls of their homes. Egyptian rulers had immense structures erected for them, adorned with thousands of images depicting their lives and accomplishments. What was once reserved for the wealthy is now easily accomplished by anyone with a smartphone.

It seems like humans have some kind of desire to preserve their existence. Sure, the narcissism we see today can't really be compared to anything, but the desire to be remembered and immortalized as long as possible has been evident throughout time.

Offline Stadler

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #122 on: March 09, 2018, 10:45:41 AM »
comic of Lonely cat lady needing attention and validation

That right there is the god damn truth.

Nothing happens on the couch. There's an entire world out there of adventure and new experience just waiting to be had. And I was like that too at one point, posting stuff and just sitting there waiting for a like. At the end of the day, it was getting in the way of me living my life.

Well, that not ENTIRELY true, especially back in high school when there was nowhere else to go....

Online Kattoelox

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #123 on: March 09, 2018, 10:49:38 AM »
Steam is the game selling platform, Twitch is the viewing site

just clarifying that :)

Offline sylvan

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #124 on: March 09, 2018, 11:06:42 AM »
And holy shit, what is it, Steam? The video game streaming site... Is this real life? People actually sit around and watch other people play video games! I remember sitting around with more friends than controllers, and inevitably it turns into, "Stop hogging the sticks ass hole, it's my turn!" And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play video games... What a world we live in!

I remember going outside with friends and playing basketball with more people than there were positions, and it inevitably turns into "stop being court hog and let me play for a bit"! And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play basketball. What a world we live in!

I watch for several reasons;
1) I'm a cheap asshole and want to watch some real time gameplay with commentary to see what the game's like before buying it.
2) The person I'm watching is a Youtuber I genuinely enjoy watching and subscribe to, and they're doing a live stream that just so happens to feature them playing a video game at the same time.
3) Sometimes it's just cool to watch people with a skill set far beyond yours compete against one another (pro sports).

Also chiming in here. The main appeals to watching YouTubers or streamers playing video games are what Chino said. With items 2 and 3, it's not even the game itself that's the main focus. It's no different than watching some talk show or something on TV with personalities you really enjoy hearing/watching. That's like telling most of America, "Hey, why do you even bother watching other people play football? Just go out and play yourselves!" Which ties into the competitive side. I also love watching people who are immensely skilled in their craft: sports, music, video games, whatever they might be, but if it's also something I work really hard to be good at, it's inspiring to see how other people are doing or how they are competing with you or other people. It's fun.

I guess I'm just not gonna get it then (I get the reviews thing, I endlessly research shit before I buy it). I could even appreciate if either of you just said, "I fucking enjoy it, so sod off!" But to try and compare being good at a video game, ANY video game, with the time and effort that professional athletes put in to achieve that level in any sport, not even just the big ones, it feels disingenuous. I've gotten my ass handed to me in many a video game, and I'm also confident that I'm one of the best players in the world at one specific game. I also played baseball at a high level for 13 years, and can shoot under par on the golf course. I can't even fathom considering the former anywhere near the latter.

Offline Train of Naught

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #125 on: March 09, 2018, 11:11:46 AM »
No one dosputed the fact that it takes more effort to be a professional athlete than a gamer (though that's also debatable), it's more about the fact that watching others can be just as entertaining, of not more, than performing said act yourself.
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Offline Cool Chris

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #126 on: March 09, 2018, 11:17:06 AM »
I was going to post Chino's points #1 and #2 but won't say it any better than he did.

I'll side with Sylvan on #3 but that's my opinion. I watch James Rolfe and Mike and Ryan play games and they will be the first to admit they aren't highly skilled gamers. Part of the enjoyment for me is watching a game kick their ass.

Getting way off topic here... but one thing I will never get is watching speedrunners. It's cool that people can master a game in that fashion, but watching someone do it holds no interest for me at all.
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Offline sylvan

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #127 on: March 09, 2018, 11:21:39 AM »
No one dosputed the fact that it takes more effort to be a professional athlete than a gamer (though that's also debatable), it's more about the fact that watching others can be just as entertaining, of not more, than performing said act yourself.

That's totally true, and I guess that's the part I'm just not gonna get. The entertainment value isn't there for me, but I can see that it is for others. But, again, that's not something I disputed, or questioned, or whatever. And guess you're also right that nobody disputed the skill level. Although, it was implied that a certain amount of skill was achieved equal to those of professional athletes and musicians and such.

Offline sylvan

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #128 on: March 09, 2018, 11:25:49 AM »
...it takes more effort to be a professional athlete than a gamer (though that's also debatable)

If you wanna start a separate thread, I would LOVE to hear your thoughts.  :biggrin:

Edit: Wait, I forgot that professional gaming leagues are actually a thing now. I suppose that opens up the argument to what effort it takes to make it as a PROFESSIONAL gamer, which is not a can of worms I wanna open up. It doesn't change anything in the end, but the road there is way bumpier.

Edit 2: I feel like I've taken this off topic. Somebody post a link to something and reel this back in...
« Last Edit: March 09, 2018, 11:32:09 AM by sylvan »

Offline Chino

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #129 on: March 09, 2018, 11:33:55 AM »
And holy shit, what is it, Steam? The video game streaming site... Is this real life? People actually sit around and watch other people play video games! I remember sitting around with more friends than controllers, and inevitably it turns into, "Stop hogging the sticks ass hole, it's my turn!" And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play video games... What a world we live in!

I remember going outside with friends and playing basketball with more people than there were positions, and it inevitably turns into "stop being court hog and let me play for a bit"! And now people voluntarily tune in to watch OTHER people play basketball. What a world we live in!

I watch for several reasons;
1) I'm a cheap asshole and want to watch some real time gameplay with commentary to see what the game's like before buying it.
2) The person I'm watching is a Youtuber I genuinely enjoy watching and subscribe to, and they're doing a live stream that just so happens to feature them playing a video game at the same time.
3) Sometimes it's just cool to watch people with a skill set far beyond yours compete against one another (pro sports).

Also chiming in here. The main appeals to watching YouTubers or streamers playing video games are what Chino said. With items 2 and 3, it's not even the game itself that's the main focus. It's no different than watching some talk show or something on TV with personalities you really enjoy hearing/watching. That's like telling most of America, "Hey, why do you even bother watching other people play football? Just go out and play yourselves!" Which ties into the competitive side. I also love watching people who are immensely skilled in their craft: sports, music, video games, whatever they might be, but if it's also something I work really hard to be good at, it's inspiring to see how other people are doing or how they are competing with you or other people. It's fun.

I guess I'm just not gonna get it then (I get the reviews thing, I endlessly research shit before I buy it). I could even appreciate if either of you just said, "I fucking enjoy it, so sod off!" But to try and compare being good at a video game, ANY video game, with the time and effort that professional athletes put in to achieve that level in any sport, not even just the big ones, it feels disingenuous. I've gotten my ass handed to me in many a video game, and I'm also confident that I'm one of the best players in the world at one specific game. I also played baseball at a high level for 13 years, and can shoot under par on the golf course. I can't even fathom considering the former anywhere near the latter.

Who cares though? There are $60M stadiums in Texas to accommodate the amount of people willing to sit down and watch a bunch of HIGH SCHOOL athletes play football. That to me is harder to understand than people wanting to watch other people play a video game. Someone doesn't have to be the best in the world at something to establish an interested audience. Do you get on people's case for watching Bob Ross rather than painting themselves? How about people who watch This Old House but live in an apartment they aren't allowed to modify? Can you believe that there are people that actually sit down and watch people race on a television when there are plenty of places that offer track days? I can't help but think of all the hours I've wasted watching people trying to cover Dream Theater songs when I could be butchering them myself.

My point wasn't to compare the overall skill and dedication required to be a gamer people watch vs. someone who plays for the Yankees. All I'm saying is that watching other people do stuff because they're better than you are can be entertaining.   
« Last Edit: March 09, 2018, 12:17:20 PM by Chino »

Offline Implode

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #130 on: March 09, 2018, 12:10:21 PM »
I guess I'm just not gonna get it then (I get the reviews thing, I endlessly research shit before I buy it). I could even appreciate if either of you just said, "I fucking enjoy it, so sod off!" But to try and compare being good at a video game, ANY video game, with the time and effort that professional athletes put in to achieve that level in any sport, not even just the big ones, it feels disingenuous. I've gotten my ass handed to me in many a video game, and I'm also confident that I'm one of the best players in the world at one specific game. I also played baseball at a high level for 13 years, and can shoot under par on the golf course. I can't even fathom considering the former anywhere near the latter.

This argument is a bit pointless because of things Cool Chris and Chino already said, but discrediting the hundreds or thousands of hours people put into something to attain a certain skill level at anything, even video games, seems a bit arbitrary just because we happen to worship traditional sports specifically--at least in the context of trying to understand why humans find interest in things.

I mean obviously, traditional sports have a much broader appeal to people in our culture. People are allowed to think streaming video games is boring, but on an objective level, it makes perfect sense to me that some people would find it fun to watch if that's what they are interested in. It's really no different.

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #131 on: March 09, 2018, 12:20:55 PM »
For me, the vlogging does nothing to hinder my experiences, and it actually enhances those experiences or provides more longevity for them. My friends and I will commonly go back and watch what we documented of the various events through the years, and we love seeing/reliving those memories.

And to reference back to when you said you don't record at concerts, but enjoy the vlogging.  For me, I enjoy recording the concerts for the very same reason you enjoy the vlogging.  It's just fun to do and doesn't hinder the concert experience at all for me.  Plus, for me, I think most of my concert youtube views are actually from me.  I love watching those many times just because I love watching concerts in general.  Not that different than how you do it, but just our different tastes.  For me, drawing the line is filming an entire concert or majority of it.  I like to capture enough to feel like you got all the highlights, but not enough to take away from enjoying actually being there.

As for twitch and live steaming.  I do that as well from time to time.  I mostly enjoy doing editting to my video game videos vs live streaming, that's just my preference, but I understand the "why would you watch" argument because I love making video game videos, but I personally don't enjoy watching them other than just to get a review/feel for a game before you buy OR because I am stuck and want to see how to figure part of a game out.  I've tried watching some of the top streamers and I find myself bored usually after 10 minutes.  But that's just me, it's a really big market and it's growing.  A lot of people really enjoy watching live streams of video games.  To each their own.

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #132 on: March 09, 2018, 12:37:33 PM »
For what it's worth, and with deepest respect, "watching others' play video games" is not at all what I was going for with idea of "filming their lives".    I use YouTube all the time for how-to videos on everything from changing the bearings on my truck, to making cheesecake.    Watching people play video games is no different than that, or watching someone play guitar, at least to me.

I'm talking more about the socialization of an online presence, as if it is something of meaning and value, and not the "content" itself.   They might overlap, but they aren't the same thing.

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #133 on: March 09, 2018, 12:41:39 PM »
I didn't think that was the point of the thread but kind of the way it started going in the current discussion.  But it is interesting because it does tie into the "filming of our lives"  I now have my webcam recording me when I play video games.  That is a filming of my life that was never there before, and surprisingly, is something that someone else may want to watch.  It's an interesting twist to the original intent of the thread.

Offline Chino

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #134 on: March 09, 2018, 12:48:54 PM »
I didn't think that was the point of the thread but kind of the way it started going in the current discussion.  But it is interesting because it does tie into the "filming of our lives"  I now have my webcam recording me when I play video games.  That is a filming of my life that was never there before, and surprisingly, is something that someone else may want to watch.  It's an interesting twist to the original intent of the thread.

I think you just highlighted the difference between what you do and what @Lizess on Instagram does. You put what you do online because you are in a sense engaging with like minded people through a commonality you all enjoy (music, concerts, video games, etc..). You're contributing to a community and a micro culture. I do it with my hydroponic and RC stuff, though I don't do it live on a Webcam. @Lizess, isn't sharing anything out of common interest. She's not "contributing" anything to a micro culture or group of people. All she does is post pics of her dress like a whore, videos of her shit talking others and taking blunt rips, and constantly trying to raise her pedestal. Her account exists to remind those around her why she's better than them. She's whoring herself out for attention. You seem to be creating content for others to enjoy, not to create envy. They are two very different things as far as social media goes. One should be embraced and encouraged, the other should be shamed.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2018, 01:00:54 PM by Chino »

Offline sylvan

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #135 on: March 09, 2018, 12:51:23 PM »
For me, I enjoy recording the concerts for the very same reason you enjoy the vlogging.  It's just fun to do and doesn't hinder the concert experience at all for me.
But what about the experience of other people that payed to perhaps watch the concert, and not document it? I say this with respect, cuz we're HERE, and that's what we do. But I wasn't so respectful of the guy at the Alter Bridge concert that busted out his phone to film some of the show and blocked my view of half the stage. I know, because I could see so clearly the timer on his phone camera, that I made it exactly 32 seconds before telling him not so kindly to get his camera out of my face.

Edit: but then again, I've watched some of those videos on YouTube (not a regular user). So what the fuck do I know? :mehlin

I'm talking more about the socialization of an online presence, as if it is something of meaning and value, and not the "content" itself.   They might overlap, but they aren't the same thing.

If you don't record that Petrucci solo and post it for people to see, did it actually happen? If you don't record that no-scope headshot and post it for people to see, did it actually happen?

Offline sylvan

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #136 on: March 09, 2018, 12:56:17 PM »

I think you just highlighted the difference between what you do and what @Lizess on Instagram does. You put what you do online because you are in a sense engaging with like minded people through a commonality you all enjoy (music, concerts, video games, etc..). You're contributing to a community and a micro culture.
That's a good point that I need to remember when it comes to some of this stuff that just so happens to cross into my life somehow, and I'm just not sure where it came from. It doesn't account for turning on my TV and seeing E-League on ESPN :facepalm:, but whatevs.

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #137 on: March 09, 2018, 01:40:14 PM »
For me, I enjoy recording the concerts for the very same reason you enjoy the vlogging.  It's just fun to do and doesn't hinder the concert experience at all for me.
But what about the experience of other people that payed to perhaps watch the concert, and not document it? I say this with respect, cuz we're HERE, and that's what we do. But I wasn't so respectful of the guy at the Alter Bridge concert that busted out his phone to film some of the show and blocked my view of half the stage. I know, because I could see so clearly the timer on his phone camera, that I made it exactly 32 seconds before telling him not so kindly to get his camera out of my face.

This is quite simple to avoid.  Just don't be a dick and be aware of your surroundings.  Trust me, I hate the guy holding the phone over their head just as much as you do.... so I don't do it.  I usually hold it eye level with my screen brightness all the way down and flash off.  I try to stand in an area where no one is behind me as well (in which case if I know that, then I'll raise my phone higher if that's the better view), but that's not always the case.  I would hate to ruin someone elses experience so I am self aware of what I am doing when I am doing it.  Most people aren't, but most people aren't filming as much as I do either, but there's always a few at every show that are being real assholes with their filming. 

I didn't think that was the point of the thread but kind of the way it started going in the current discussion.  But it is interesting because it does tie into the "filming of our lives"  I now have my webcam recording me when I play video games.  That is a filming of my life that was never there before, and surprisingly, is something that someone else may want to watch.  It's an interesting twist to the original intent of the thread.

I think you just highlighted the difference between what you do and what @Lizess on Instagram does. You put what you do online because you are in a sense engaging with like minded people through a commonality you all enjoy (music, concerts, video games, etc..). You're contributing to a community and a micro culture. I do it with my hydroponic and RC stuff, though I don't do it live on a Webcam. @Lizess, isn't sharing anything out of common interest. She's not "contributing" anything to a micro culture or group of people. All she does is post pics of her dress like a whore, videos of her shit talking others and taking blunt rips, and constantly trying to raise her pedestal. Her account exists to remind those around her why she's better than them. She's whoring herself out for attention. You seem to be creating content for others to enjoy, not to create envy. They are two very different things as far as social media goes. One should be embraced and encouraged, the other should be shamed.

Honestly, I love when people interect with my youtube channel for music.  I feel like it helps spread the word of good music that's out there that's not on the radio.  I was telling King last weekend when we were having a beer that if I wanted to grow my channel, I could go to a Miley Cyris concert and do the same thing and get tons and tons of followers (I've noticed other metal concert youtubers with significant followings have done so).  The music I (well, we all here) like isn't very popular, I love when people comment and say they were glad I shared the music.   I don't make money, if anything the bands are allowed to claim copyright ownership and run ads along my video to make some money.  So I love all of that, I want to support the music and I also genuinely enjoy doing it as well. 

Offline sylvan

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #138 on: March 09, 2018, 01:49:46 PM »
Well then Cram, I appreciate your being conscious of that fact and acting accordingly :tup. Not like I'm the concert police or anything...

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Re: The filming of our lives...
« Reply #139 on: March 09, 2018, 02:01:49 PM »
Well then Cram, I appreciate your being conscious of that fact and acting accordingly :tup. Not like I'm the concert police or anything...

I have to admit.  I've pissed people off before though.  I recall some guy wanting to beat my up at a 311 concert this summer.  I'm not quite sure how I was in his way all the way in the back of the venue with no one immediately around me, but he made sure to let me know he didn't like me and wanted me far away from him.  Well, at least that's the way I interpreted his drunk mumbles.