Author Topic: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use  (Read 63231 times)

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Online El Barto

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1015 on: July 30, 2018, 03:30:27 PM »
Anyone see this...

http://georgiatoday.ge/news/11592/Smoking-Marijuana-Legalized-in-Georgia
You do realize that's the country, Georgia, and not the state, right?
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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1016 on: July 30, 2018, 03:32:25 PM »
NJ has effectively decriminalized:

https://www.nj.com/marijuana/2018/07/nj_just_effectively_decriminalized_weed_possession.html

There's still a lot of opposition for legalization though so it's not an easy road in NJ as our Governor had promised, but it's a start.

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Offline Phoenix87x

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1018 on: September 18, 2018, 09:08:39 AM »
Coca cola is considering bring out a line of weed cola

https://mashable.com/article/coca-cola-weed-infused-drinks/#L64VRJ_ZNsqh
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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1019 on: October 10, 2018, 02:25:25 PM »
I recently invested in Canopy Growth (a marijuana stock) since it's available to trade in Robinhood (happen to do it right before Corona's parent company invested in it).  So far been doing super well and I've been reading more about it being potentially a huge stock in the future with Canada legalization going into effect on the 17th, plus the slow tide of moving towards legalization around the US.

Speaking of, https://patch.com/new-jersey/princeton/nj-sets-possible-date-marijuana-legalization-tax Halloween might be extra spooky this year in NJ  :lol

Online El Barto

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1020 on: October 10, 2018, 02:29:45 PM »
I recently invested in Canopy Growth (a marijuana stock) since it's available to trade in Robinhood (happen to do it right before Corona's parent company invested in it).  So far been doing super well and I've been reading more about it being potentially a huge stock in the future with Canada legalization going into effect on the 17th, plus the slow tide of moving towards legalization around the US.

Speaking of, https://patch.com/new-jersey/princeton/nj-sets-possible-date-marijuana-legalization-tax Halloween might be extra spooky this year in NJ  :lol
Marijuana stocks have been insanely volatile. A ten dollar stock will drop to $5 one day, shoot up to $30 the next, and then back down to a buck-twenty on the third. And right now there are so many of them it's hard to tell who's going to wind up being the new Phillip Morris in the long term.
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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1021 on: October 10, 2018, 02:40:15 PM »
I recently invested in Canopy Growth (a marijuana stock) since it's available to trade in Robinhood (happen to do it right before Corona's parent company invested in it).  So far been doing super well and I've been reading more about it being potentially a huge stock in the future with Canada legalization going into effect on the 17th, plus the slow tide of moving towards legalization around the US.

Speaking of, https://patch.com/new-jersey/princeton/nj-sets-possible-date-marijuana-legalization-tax Halloween might be extra spooky this year in NJ  :lol
Marijuana stocks have been insanely volatile. A ten dollar stock will drop to $5 one day, shoot up to $30 the next, and then back down to a buck-twenty on the third. And right now there are so many of them it's hard to tell who's going to wind up being the new Phillip Morris in the long term.

This is what I've been reading, but I wanted to get in on something in this market.  Essentially using Robinhood, I am somewhat limited, but since it's a free trading app and I admittingly am a noob at trading stocks, I am cool working within this bubble.  But CGC has been a very popular stock for millenials on robinhood https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/marijuana-canopy-growth-stock-price-millennials-flocking-nyse-pot-company-2018-6-1027328228 and I felt it was worth a small risk. (I'm not investing any serious money to break the bank or make the bank).

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1022 on: October 10, 2018, 02:53:09 PM »
I bought $7500 of TGIFF at $0.46 pps. I expect that to be at least $25k in 2.5-4 years time.

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1023 on: October 10, 2018, 02:59:52 PM »
I bought $7500 of TGIFF at $0.46 pps. I expect that to be at least $25k in 2.5-4 years time.

What makes you expect that?  Just the market in general or you think this company is going to beat out others?  I only really got into CGC because I read it was a growing stock for young people to buy.  I figured I'd follow the money, but honestly don't know what seperates them from other marijuana companies.  Although since then I read about how beverage companies are looking to (or already) invested in CGC so I think I can see more future growth from backing from big corporations. 

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1024 on: October 10, 2018, 03:16:29 PM »
And of course I just get this targetted news from yahoo now:

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/does-marijuana-stock-apos-decision-131500061.html

This was another stock I read about but I can't buy it yet, but sounds like I might be able to soon.  I'm going to follow this one.

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1025 on: October 11, 2018, 07:09:26 AM »
I bought $7500 of TGIFF at $0.46 pps. I expect that to be at least $25k in 2.5-4 years time.

What makes you expect that?  Just the market in general or you think this company is going to beat out others?  I only really got into CGC because I read it was a growing stock for young people to buy.  I figured I'd follow the money, but honestly don't know what seperates them from other marijuana companies.  Although since then I read about how beverage companies are looking to (or already) invested in CGC so I think I can see more future growth from backing from big corporations.

They are Nevada's largest supplier and they have performed very solidly and predictably over the last year. The only thing limiting their expansion is the rate at which they can get funding. They have two more facilities being constructed that should give then an addition 100,000sqft, and once the surrounding states (or federally) legalize, they're in a great position to branch out. Personally, I think they're going to be bought out. One of the monsters from Canada is going to want to set up shop, and they'll have more money than 1933 will be able to raise for other endeavors. They'll be offered a buy out for their supply chain.

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1026 on: October 11, 2018, 08:50:36 AM »
Bart mentioned this in passing, but for the life of me, I can't understand why RJ Reynolds or Phil Morris isn't consolidating the industry yet.  I read an article in Rolling Confirmation Bias Magazine (it's in some markets as "Rolling Stone Magazine") that talked about the problem of illegal/unregulated pesticide use on the cannabis crops, and how the dichotomy of laws is making that a much worse problem than it should be, and through the entire article I was thinking "there are about four companies that have been doing this for decades and certainly have the technology, equipment and wherewithall - even assuming that the crops have different specific requirements for care - to do this efficiently and effectively.

To answer my own question, the only things I can think of are a) it's far too early, so let the competition weed (see what I did there?) out the players from the pretenders, or b) that RJR/PM are too big to f*** around with 50 different state programs, all of which conflict - by definition - with the Federal position.  They may literally have too much to lose at this point.   

Online El Barto

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1027 on: October 11, 2018, 09:28:02 AM »
Bart mentioned this in passing, but for the life of me, I can't understand why RJ Reynolds or Phil Morris isn't consolidating the industry yet.  I read an article in Rolling Confirmation Bias Magazine (it's in some markets as "Rolling Stone Magazine") that talked about the problem of illegal/unregulated pesticide use on the cannabis crops, and how the dichotomy of laws is making that a much worse problem than it should be, and through the entire article I was thinking "there are about four companies that have been doing this for decades and certainly have the technology, equipment and wherewithall - even assuming that the crops have different specific requirements for care - to do this efficiently and effectively.

To answer my own question, the only things I can think of are a) it's far too early, so let the competition weed (see what I did there?) out the players from the pretenders, or b) that RJR/PM are too big to f*** around with 50 different state programs, all of which conflict - by definition - with the Federal position.  They may literally have too much to lose at this point.   
I'm guessing it's the latter. One thing I can tell you that what they produce will be very different than what people are currently after. People nowadays want to choose from 500 strains of high-grade weed. I think I've got 9 at home right now. It's kind of like wine in that regard. When the legal situation settles somebody is going to mass produce Weed brand weed, and there will definitely be a market for it. You can still buy Mexican weed for the same $30/quarter it's been for 30 years, even in Colorado, and that's what Big Tobacco will recreate. That won't take away from the modern market for boutique smoke, though. It will just be grabbing a different share.

Also, I think they're still fat and happy making smokes for Europe and Asia.
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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1028 on: October 11, 2018, 09:41:59 AM »
Mass market branded Weed is something that if lowering the price point significantly can be used to offset the still illegal market in legal states. 

And agreed, you'll still have people, like myself (I am starting to find strands that I enjoy more than others) who will enjoy the variety and sampling of the finer strands, similar to wine I guess.

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1029 on: October 11, 2018, 01:26:20 PM »
Bart mentioned this in passing, but for the life of me, I can't understand why RJ Reynolds or Phil Morris isn't consolidating the industry yet.  I read an article in Rolling Confirmation Bias Magazine (it's in some markets as "Rolling Stone Magazine") that talked about the problem of illegal/unregulated pesticide use on the cannabis crops, and how the dichotomy of laws is making that a much worse problem than it should be, and through the entire article I was thinking "there are about four companies that have been doing this for decades and certainly have the technology, equipment and wherewithall - even assuming that the crops have different specific requirements for care - to do this efficiently and effectively.

To answer my own question, the only things I can think of are a) it's far too early, so let the competition weed (see what I did there?) out the players from the pretenders, or b) that RJR/PM are too big to f*** around with 50 different state programs, all of which conflict - by definition - with the Federal position.  They may literally have too much to lose at this point.   
I'm guessing it's the latter. One thing I can tell you that what they produce will be very different than what people are currently after. People nowadays want to choose from 500 strains of high-grade weed. I think I've got 9 at home right now. It's kind of like wine in that regard. When the legal situation settles somebody is going to mass produce Weed brand weed, and there will definitely be a market for it. You can still buy Mexican weed for the same $30/quarter it's been for 30 years, even in Colorado, and that's what Big Tobacco will recreate. That won't take away from the modern market for boutique smoke, though. It will just be grabbing a different share.

Also, I think they're still fat and happy making smokes for Europe and Asia.

Well, I agree with you that wine is an excellent example (or alcohol in general for that matter).  There will always be a market for Thunderbird, Yellow Tail, or Budweiser, cheap vodka and Everclear.  There is, by contrast, almost no market for the wine I make in my backyard, or that beer that's brewing in my cellar (there is neither, by the way, though my great uncle make "spirits" until the day he died; it wasn't bad, actually, though I fear I've lost a couple IQ points, and a couple years of cogent thought on the back end for drinking it). 

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Re: Amendment 64 Passes: Colorado Legalizes Marijuana For Recreational Use
« Reply #1030 on: October 11, 2018, 03:34:42 PM »
Bart mentioned this in passing, but for the life of me, I can't understand why RJ Reynolds or Phil Morris isn't consolidating the industry yet.  I read an article in Rolling Confirmation Bias Magazine (it's in some markets as "Rolling Stone Magazine") that talked about the problem of illegal/unregulated pesticide use on the cannabis crops, and how the dichotomy of laws is making that a much worse problem than it should be, and through the entire article I was thinking "there are about four companies that have been doing this for decades and certainly have the technology, equipment and wherewithall - even assuming that the crops have different specific requirements for care - to do this efficiently and effectively.

To answer my own question, the only things I can think of are a) it's far too early, so let the competition weed (see what I did there?) out the players from the pretenders, or b) that RJR/PM are too big to f*** around with 50 different state programs, all of which conflict - by definition - with the Federal position.  They may literally have too much to lose at this point.   
I'm guessing it's the latter. One thing I can tell you that what they produce will be very different than what people are currently after. People nowadays want to choose from 500 strains of high-grade weed. I think I've got 9 at home right now. It's kind of like wine in that regard. When the legal situation settles somebody is going to mass produce Weed brand weed, and there will definitely be a market for it. You can still buy Mexican weed for the same $30/quarter it's been for 30 years, even in Colorado, and that's what Big Tobacco will recreate. That won't take away from the modern market for boutique smoke, though. It will just be grabbing a different share.

Also, I think they're still fat and happy making smokes for Europe and Asia.

Well, I agree with you that wine is an excellent example (or alcohol in general for that matter).  There will always be a market for Thunderbird, Yellow Tail, or Budweiser, cheap vodka and Everclear.  There is, by contrast, almost no market for the wine I make in my backyard, or that beer that's brewing in my cellar (there is neither, by the way, though my great uncle make "spirits" until the day he died; it wasn't bad, actually, though I fear I've lost a couple IQ points, and a couple years of cogent thought on the back end for drinking it).
Plenty of people will grow their own. Far more than would distill, ferment, or brew. Growing dope is as easy or as hard as you like it to be, and you don't have to worry about still explosions. Homegrown certainly cuts into the boutique market. It'll cut into the Mexican skank market a tiny bit. It won't phase Big Tobacco. BT will wind up in a middle ground catering to the occasional, recreational potheads. The sorority chick who has no connection and no time go grow her own, but wants to smoke up on the way to the Bruno Mars gig.

That might actually be the answer to the question. It won't be as cheep as shwag, and it won't be as good as dispensary stuff. The market share they'd be after would be somewhat narrow, I suppose.
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