Poll

How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?

I trust them completely
Not completely, but quite a bit
I don't trust or distrust them
Not much, but I do at times
I distrust them completely

Voting closes: May 27, 2025, 12:05:53 PM

Author Topic: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?  (Read 396 times)

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Offline KevShmev

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How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« on: August 15, 2019, 12:05:53 PM »
Consider this question in general terms...

Put me in the "I distrust them completely" category.  I might have said "Not much, but I do at times" many years ago, but they have gone completely off the rails in the last 10-11 years to where I do not trust them at all.

Offline gmillerdrake

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2019, 12:13:56 PM »
Near zero. It is no longer news....it's near all opinion and commentary with cherry picked 'facts' to support whichever view they're spouting....both 'righ wing' news sources and 'left wing'.

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Offline Chino

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2019, 12:19:44 PM »
I voted "not completely, but quite a bit".   

Listening to talking heads screaming their opinions back and forth is not news. Opinion pieces are not news.   

However, when reading actual articles that required legitimate journalism and reporting, it's not that bad. New York Times, NPR, and Fox News (Forbes and Bloomberg as well if those count) are my go-to sources for actual news. Everything else is just ego stroking.   

I trust local stuff almost entirely. The Town Times, The Hartford Courant, The Waterbury Republican... all great sources to find out what's going on at the local level.

Offline El Barto

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2019, 12:21:26 PM »
Wow. It's very rare for a DTF poll to have an option that actually reflects my position. I neither trust nor distrust the media. I understand it. I know how and why it operates. With that understanding trust is irreverent. Either side will report most facts, and they'll both omit a few that the other will provide. FOX will never, ever report a story that reflects positively on a democrat, or negatively on a republican unless it's so egregious that it can't be ignored (and then it will be spun). The same rule applies to MSNBC with the parties reversed. The important details are always the same. Once I get the big picture I decide how to process it myself. That's why I read but don't watch any of these outlets.

In any case, trust infers reliance, and if you rely on the media to provide meaning or interpretation you're a fool.
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Offline El Barto

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2019, 12:23:45 PM »
However, when reading actual articles that required legitimate journalism and reporting, it's not that bad. New York Times, NPR, and Fox News are my go-to sources for actual news. Everything else is just ego stroking.   
Al Jazeera is surprisingly solid. A little to world-centric, but even their US reporting is respectable.
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Offline cramx3

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2019, 12:31:16 PM »
"I don't trust or distrust them"

It really all depends on what's being reported and by who.  I think on basis, I want to believe everything I hear on the news or read, but it's really hard to distinguish opinion from fact sometimes and even harder to judge when you see conflicting reports and click bait headlines.

Offline Stadler

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #6 on: August 15, 2019, 12:47:46 PM »
Wow. It's very rare for a DTF poll to have an option that actually reflects my position. I neither trust nor distrust the media. I understand it. I know how and why it operates. With that understanding trust is irreverent. Either side will report most facts, and they'll both omit a few that the other will provide. FOX will never, ever report a story that reflects positively on a democrat, or negatively on a republican unless it's so egregious that it can't be ignored (and then it will be spun). The same rule applies to MSNBC with the parties reversed. The important details are always the same. Once I get the big picture I decide how to process it myself. That's why I read but don't watch any of these outlets.

In any case, trust infers reliance, and if you rely on the media to provide meaning or interpretation you're a fool.

Increasingly, though, it's not just "party" but platform and issue.   CNN might as well be programmed by the Brady Campaign at this point.   And that might be the downside of "watching" not reading.  ;)     But I think when you get to the bigger hard news outlets you can rely on it to teh extent you're incorporating facts into your analysis.   I'm finding more and more that it takes multiple sources to really flesh out an issue, and to my mind that's not a good thing.  WE'RE all advocating for that, WE all read multiple sources, but in my experience, we're the minority.  I know far more people that get a "Yahoo" alert on their phone and think "Hey, I'm informed!".   

Since they are the same outlets, I want to say that I agree with Chino; the local news around here is pretty darn good, all things considered (and compared to the other places I've lived or am familiar with:  Erie, Philly, Charlotte, Atlanta, Florida).

Offline El Barto

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #7 on: August 15, 2019, 12:53:24 PM »
Wow. It's very rare for a DTF poll to have an option that actually reflects my position. I neither trust nor distrust the media. I understand it. I know how and why it operates. With that understanding trust is irreverent. Either side will report most facts, and they'll both omit a few that the other will provide. FOX will never, ever report a story that reflects positively on a democrat, or negatively on a republican unless it's so egregious that it can't be ignored (and then it will be spun). The same rule applies to MSNBC with the parties reversed. The important details are always the same. Once I get the big picture I decide how to process it myself. That's why I read but don't watch any of these outlets.

In any case, trust infers reliance, and if you rely on the media to provide meaning or interpretation you're a fool.

Increasingly, though, it's not just "party" but platform and issue.   CNN might as well be programmed by the Brady Campaign at this point.   And that might be the downside of "watching" not reading.  ;)     But I think when you get to the bigger hard news outlets you can rely on it to teh extent you're incorporating facts into your analysis.   I'm finding more and more that it takes multiple sources to really flesh out an issue, and to my mind that's not a good thing.  WE'RE all advocating for that, WE all read multiple sources, but in my experience, we're the minority.  I know far more people that get a "Yahoo" alert on their phone and think "Hey, I'm informed!".   

Since they are the same outlets, I want to say that I agree with Chino; the local news around here is pretty darn good, all things considered (and compared to the other places I've lived or am familiar with:  Erie, Philly, Charlotte, Atlanta, Florida).
Same practices still apply.
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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2019, 01:54:22 PM »
The news are good to get the main story. Which side of the story I take is 100% on me.

Offline Harmony

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2019, 02:13:45 PM »
I'm with others here.  I don't trust or mistrust them.  I realize they have a prime directive.  To sell a story.  There are some I trust more than others, but I still often try to double check facts and look for (and dismiss) the bias.

To the list of more trusted sources, I'd add McClatchy.

I also like The Boston Globe for their in depth reports - the ones on CTE and the pedophile priests scandal were particularly excellent.

Offline sylvan

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #10 on: August 15, 2019, 03:24:04 PM »
I'm with others here.  I don't trust or mistrust them.  I realize they have a prime directive.  To sell a story.

I'm not singling you out here with this response, just the idea is right there to bounce off of. At what point does their prime directive move the needle into "mistrust"? Or is it simply that their prime directive is what moves the needle to neutral, as opposed to comfortably in the "trust" range?

Even if the majority of the time I can "trust" the facts, it's always a partial truth in favor of directing the narrative. While I echo the idea that most people have regarding taking the news from the opinion, it becomes even more problematic when the "news" itself is subjective, leaving out important facts to sway opinion, or including unnecessary and unrelated facts for the same purpose. Yeah, I'll do the work to find out the best I can what's going on. But it seems more and more like these "businesses" are not at all interested in the increasing difficulty to do so.

Offline bosk1

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #11 on: August 15, 2019, 03:41:33 PM »
I've been thinking about the answer to this all day, and it's really hard to say. 

One of the issues I see presented by a few in the thread is "facts" vs. "opinion."  I get people saying they trust facts.  But some problems I see often are very subtle spins on the facts that are not readily apparent as opinion, omission of key facts, and misrepresentation of facts.  So I cannot say I have a strong trust in the news media to simply report on facts.

Another issue is people saying they trust their local news.  My kneejerk reaction was to agree.  But actually, on further reflection, I cannot say that is the case either.  I have discovered through the years that even the local news media here has an incredibly strong bias, both in terms of what they choose to report and how they report it.  There was a huge story here years ago that was reported in the papers that really whipped the state into a furor over a particular issue.  It did not readily appear to be a partisan issue and did not appear to be overly political.  So there was not a readily-apparent assumed bias one way or the other.  Years later, I worked on a case that, unbeknownst to me at the time, was an outgrowth of that story.  Seeing all of the behind the scenes stuff, I learned that that old story was demonstrably false, both in terms of the facts that were reported AND how it was reported.  It was shocking.  That, more than anything else, undermined my trust in the news media to report on facts.  And since then, I have seen plenty of other stories reported locally where I can now see the bias and the errors.  It is really disheartening.
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Online Kattelox

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2019, 04:37:24 PM »
I thought a lot of local networks were children of much larger national networks.
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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #13 on: August 15, 2019, 04:47:37 PM »
Yes, but they typically have local news coverage, which is more what I was speaking to on the "local" issue.
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Offline El Barto

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #14 on: August 15, 2019, 04:48:39 PM »
I've been thinking about the answer to this all day, and it's really hard to say. 

One of the issues I see presented by a few in the thread is "facts" vs. "opinion."  I get people saying they trust facts.  But some problems I see often are very subtle spins on the facts that are not readily apparent as opinion, omission of key facts, and misrepresentation of facts.  So I cannot say I have a strong trust in the news media to simply report on facts.

Another issue is people saying they trust their local news.  My kneejerk reaction was to agree.  But actually, on further reflection, I cannot say that is the case either.  I have discovered through the years that even the local news media here has an incredibly strong bias, both in terms of what they choose to report and how they report it.  There was a huge story here years ago that was reported in the papers that really whipped the state into a furor over a particular issue.  It did not readily appear to be a partisan issue and did not appear to be overly political.  So there was not a readily-apparent assumed bias one way or the other.  Years later, I worked on a case that, unbeknownst to me at the time, was an outgrowth of that story.  Seeing all of the behind the scenes stuff, I learned that that old story was demonstrably false, both in terms of the facts that were reported AND how it was reported.  It was shocking.  That, more than anything else, undermined my trust in the news media to report on facts.  And since then, I have seen plenty of other stories reported locally where I can now see the bias and the errors.  It is really disheartening.
The problem I see with local media is many places, including the 9th largest city in the US, only have one daily newspaper. If there's no counterpoint there's no basis for establishing credibility. In our case, The Dallas Morning News is essentially Trump's FOX for the City of Dallas. There's a cozy enough relationship there that you're not always sure who's pulling the strings. Thankfully we have a local liberal weekly, like most large cities, with an excellent beat writer to provide some counterpoint. Yet unless you pick it up to look at the club listings or find a "masseuse" on the back page you probably have no idea if what the DMN is reporting is true or not, which varies per the agenda. And you'll certainly never hear about the boondoggles and missteps (and we've had some real beauties).
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Offline Stadler

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #15 on: August 15, 2019, 05:58:19 PM »
I think we have to discuss the other problem; when you know the source you have is biased, and you know you're forced to pick and choose there facts from various sources, it becomes a pretty strong temptation - and a much easier task - to start formulating conclusions before all the facts are in, which then leads to the temptation to cherry pick the information that fits your mindset, and not let the facts lead you to the conclusion.   It's also too easy - and this is just human nature, survival instinct at work - to short cut information.  "Oh, that LOOKS LIKE x-y-z, so this must be a-b-c."   

(For those that think these conversations are useless or a waste of time, I find that digging in on conversations like these force me to look harder at the facts and not assume the surface story is the only story.)

Offline Harmony

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #16 on: August 15, 2019, 06:03:59 PM »
I'm with others here.  I don't trust or mistrust them.  I realize they have a prime directive.  To sell a story.

I'm not singling you out here with this response, just the idea is right there to bounce off of. At what point does their prime directive move the needle into "mistrust"? Or is it simply that their prime directive is what moves the needle to neutral, as opposed to comfortably in the "trust" range?

It's a good question.  And if you had asked me when I was younger and before the 24/7 news cycle, I probably would've answered very differently.  I remember thinking how easy it was to write off The National Enquirer and supermarket rags like that and almost completely trust in the local news and papers.  The 24/7 news cycle changed everything and internet news even more.  Ever notice how you can go from source to source and read the EXACT same story?  This sort of sloppy journalism is annoying AF.

Anyway to answer your question specifically the prime directive moves me more into the mistrust category mostly.  But having the awareness that it is a business above everything else - a business driven by revenue - helps me to have a healthy dose of skepticism at the outset.

Anyone ever see the movie The Insider with Russell Crowe and Al Pacino?  The movie is mostly about the whistle blower Jeffrey Weigand and the tobacco industry.  But it is also about the news industry, specifically 60 minutes, and how the show is being moved from being a trusted news source willing to put it all on the line for a public health issue vs. a business afraid of being sued while CBS is being purchased by Westinghouse and enriching the executive producers of 60 minutes in the process.  Once the news industry became more about making money than about providing the news the wheels came off the cart, IMO.

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #17 on: August 15, 2019, 08:51:45 PM »
Not much, but I do at times.   Basically, when I want to get caught up on a major catastrophe, I believe that they can give me a relatively decent idea of what actually took place.     Beyond that, I trust them about as much as a used car dealer.   
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Offline sylvan

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #18 on: August 16, 2019, 06:12:20 AM »
Shit, it's in full effect right now! According to reports, Epstein had a broken Hyoid bone in his neck at autopsy. Now, depending on what news source your hear this from, this broken bone is both proof that he hung himself AND that something fishy might happened  :facepalm:. This shit is embarrassing...

Offline Dave_Manchester

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #19 on: August 16, 2019, 07:43:06 AM »
There are 2 levels of receiving information about the world (i.e 'news'). The first level is what is happening and the second is why it is happening. To know what is happening, the media is generally reliable. There are protests in Hong Kong now. North Korea has rejected peace talks with South Korea. Russia has moved mercenaries into the Central African Republic. This stuff is about what is happening in the world and I rely on reporters to bring me this information.

For the more important level of why things happen, 'news' networks are a waste of time. In America, the major networks are owned by corporations who push narratives that serve their economic interests. Their purpose is not to give people the information needed to form independent opinions, it's to shape the ideas and emotional reactions of a voting public. If it's some emotional event like a mass shooting then the 'what' level of information lasts barely 5 minutes before FOX and CNN move right onto their 'why' narratives and the slanging match begins. Media oligarchs like Murdoch or Lebedev or, previously, Robert Maxwell (his daughter is in the news now because of the Epstein case) move heaven and earth to acquire even the smallest regional newspapers or TV stations. They don't do this because of a burning need to inform the public about what's happening in the world. It's estimated that Rupert Murdoch spent over 20 million dollars in legal fees alone in his (thankfully unsuccessful) fight with the British government to acquire British Sky Broadcasting last year. The guy is 88 years old. He doesn't do this because he really wants a handful of people in the Shetland Islands to know the status of the war in Somalia.

My advice to my friends and family who ask me about this question is similar to what people have already written in this thread:

1) Don't watch your news. Read it. You can't concentrate properly if you're being dazzled with studio lights, camera trickery, emotive footage, cleavage and so on (Barto posted a clip of Epstein at another forum in which the editors had slowed down the footage of Epstein to make him look even more sinister - the Simpsons mocked this media tactic 20 years ago in their episode about Homer being accused of sexual assault). Get your news from written articles, where you can check each fact and read the biography and credentials of the writer.

2) Don't think in terms of trust or not trust. Simply understand what the media is in the 21st century, who owns it, and what their interests are.

3) Study history. Protests in Hong Kong now. Ok. Why? Where is Hong Kong? What is its political relationship with the central Chinese government? Who is its current Chief Executive? When, why and by whom was she given the job? And so on. All of this is information which can be found within 10 minutes on Wikipedia, and it needs to be known before sitting down to read about the current protests. Without knowing this basic information, there's no reason to be watching footage of riots and chaotic airports, because there's no context to any of it beyond some vague idea that China = repressive, Hong Kong = 'democracy'.

4) If you have children, put a map of the world on their bedroom wall. It amazes me how many parents don't do this very simple thing, even though I think it's one of the best things you can do for your kids' general knowledge. Children must be able to place current events on the map. If they see a story about Syria or Iran, they must know where they are and what countries they border. A tanker has been seized in the Strait of Hormuz? Ok. Where is it? Why is it so strategically important? Let's look at what countries it connects and what interests the US/Britain/Russia/France have in that region. It's staggering to me how little basic knowledge many people have of world events and I think a lot of this would be addressed if every night children went to bed staring at a map of our world and naturally getting a sense of its shape. You can even buy maps which highlight geopolitical boundaries and list the prominent events from history that formed those boundaries. Without knowing this stuff, there's no reason for you to be watching the 'news'. It would be like a physics class consisting of nothing more than a professor dropping an object onto the floor.

"What did you learn today, son?"
"Stuff falls when you drop it".
"Why?"
"Dunno. Does it matter?"

The overall conclusion I took from the Mueller Report (disclosure: I did not read it, I read a summary from a UK political website I respect) is that the greatest threat facing American 'democracy' is a population that is ill-equipped to recognise misinformation and the methods that are used to promulgate it by political actors whose interest is creating a confused, fatigued and apathetic American population. Russia has been blamed for this. I don't think that's fair. Russia simply used the tools that America itself created: your media (both social and traditional) and a lazy, overly-emotional public. We have something like 4 threads on this forum now about the state of American politics and not one about the state of the American population that produces this kind of politics. The next generation of citizens in 'democratic' countries need to be far better prepared to evaluate information.


(edited to correct my shameful mix-up of the Simpsons episode. It was Homer who was pilloried by Rock Bottom for peeling the Gummy de Milo off that girl's sweeeeeet can. Willie was the one who ended up exonerating him, albeit by admitting to being a Rowdy Roddy Peeper).
« Last Edit: August 16, 2019, 01:56:42 PM by Dave_Manchester »
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Offline JayOctavarium

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #20 on: August 16, 2019, 10:25:47 AM »
I've been thinking about the answer to this all day, and it's really hard to say. 

One of the issues I see presented by a few in the thread is "facts" vs. "opinion."  I get people saying they trust facts.  But some problems I see often are very subtle spins on the facts that are not readily apparent as opinion, omission of key facts, and misrepresentation of facts.  So I cannot say I have a strong trust in the news media to simply report on facts.

Another issue is people saying they trust their local news.  My kneejerk reaction was to agree.  But actually, on further reflection, I cannot say that is the case either.  I have discovered through the years that even the local news media here has an incredibly strong bias, both in terms of what they choose to report and how they report it.  There was a huge story here years ago that was reported in the papers that really whipped the state into a furor over a particular issue.  It did not readily appear to be a partisan issue and did not appear to be overly political.  So there was not a readily-apparent assumed bias one way or the other.  Years later, I worked on a case that, unbeknownst to me at the time, was an outgrowth of that story.  Seeing all of the behind the scenes stuff, I learned that that old story was demonstrably false, both in terms of the facts that were reported AND how it was reported.  It was shocking.  That, more than anything else, undermined my trust in the news media to report on facts.  And since then, I have seen plenty of other stories reported locally where I can now see the bias and the errors.  It is really disheartening.
The problem I see with local media is many places, including the 9th largest city in the US, only have one daily newspaper. If there's no counterpoint there's no basis for establishing credibility. In our case, The Dallas Morning News is essentially Trump's FOX for the City of Dallas. There's a cozy enough relationship there that you're not always sure who's pulling the strings. Thankfully we have a local liberal weekly, like most large cities, with an excellent beat writer to provide some counterpoint. Yet unless you pick it up to look at the club listings or find a "masseuse" on the back page you probably have no idea if what the DMN is reporting is true or not, which varies per the agenda. And you'll certainly never hear about the boondoggles and missteps (and we've had some real beauties).

Locally for my county we have 1 source of news. One newspaper (Ventura County Star- owned by USA Today). Yes, the news stations out of LA and the 1 out of Santa Barbara will report on big ticket things happening, but I have learned that a lot of the times, they are just regurgitating what the VCStar had reported the day before. We have 1 radio station will report on things once and a while, but no detail. There's another weekly paper that sometimes has some in depth reporting in it, but it doesn't come out frequently enough to matter.

And then we have several very conservative "websites" (Basically Facebook pages) that selectively regurgitate our PD's press releases. I roll my eyes when I see people sharing these "articles" online, because they are literally copy / pastes of the press releases,  with details removed, or other "facts" added in that I just can't seem to verify.
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Offline cramx3

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #21 on: August 16, 2019, 12:05:12 PM »
4) If you have children, put a map of the world on their bedroom wall. It amazes me how many parents don't do this very simple thing, even though I think it's one of the best things you can do for your kids' general knowledge. Children must be able to place current events on the map. If they see a story about Syria or Iran, they must know where they are and what countries they border.

That's a good idea.  I remember my friend having a globe and just being so fascinated wtih it as a kid.  Even today, I love looking at maps and google maps specifically since its so easy. 

Offline JayOctavarium

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #22 on: August 16, 2019, 12:17:59 PM »

1) Don't watch your news. Read it. You can't concentrate properly if you're being dazzled with studio lights, camera trickery, emotive footage, cleavage and so on (Barto posted a clip of Epstein at another forum in which the editors had slowed down the footage of Epstein to make him look even more sinister - the Simpsons mocked this media tactic 20 years ago in their episode about Groundskeeper Willie being accused of sexual assault). Get your news from written articles, where you can check each fact and read the biography and credentials of the writer.

2) Don't think in terms of trust or not trust. Simply understand what the media is in the 21st century, who owns it, and what their interests are.

3) Study history. Protests in Hong Kong now. Ok. Why? Where is Hong Kong? What is its political relationship with the central Chinese government? Who is its current Chief Executive? When, why and by whom was she given the job? And so on. All of this is information which can be found within 10 minutes on Wikipedia, and it needs to be known before sitting down to read about the current protests. Without knowing this basic information, there's no reason to be watching footage of riots and chaotic airports, because there's no context to any of it beyond some vague idea that China = repressive, Hong Kong = 'democracy'.

4) If you have children, put a map of the world on their bedroom wall. It amazes me how many parents don't do this very simple thing, even though I think it's one of the best things you can do for your kids' general knowledge. Children must be able to place current events on the map. If they see a story about Syria or Iran, they must know where they are and what countries they border. A tanker has been seized in the Strait of Hormuz? Ok. Where is it? Why is it so strategically important? Let's look at what countries it connects and what interests the US/Britain/Russia/France have in that region. It's staggering to me how little basic knowledge many people have of world events and I think a lot of this would be addressed if every night children went to bed staring at a map of our world and naturally getting a sense of its shape. You can even buy maps which highlight geopolitical boundaries and list the prominent events from history that formed those boundaries. Without knowing this stuff, there's no reason for you to be watching the 'news'. It would be like a physics class consisting of nothing more than a professor dropping an object onto the floor.



I agree with this 100%
I just don't understand what they were trying to achieve with any part of the song, either individually or as a whole. You know what? It's the Platypus of Dream Theater songs. That bill doesn't go with that tail, or that strange little furry body, or those webbed feet, and oh god why does it have venomous spurs!? And then you find out it lays eggs too. The difference is that the Platypus is somehow functional despite being a crazy mishmash or leftover animal pieces

-BlobVanDam on "Scarred"

Offline lonestar

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #23 on: August 17, 2019, 11:09:04 AM »
I always have to keep the perspective that TV news is an entertainment production first and foremost, and if I'm gonna waste good TV time on news, it better be a significant event. For me, my Google alarm does a news briefing when it wakes me up, and in five minutes can give me the meat and potatoes of what's happening, anything else I'm curious about I'll search deeper. The world is way to chaotic for me to try and consume it all, and I don't have the patience nor the will to even try. No matter my opinion, it's gonna do what it's gonna do, and no amount of information is gonna change that.
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Offline Progmetty

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #24 on: August 17, 2019, 01:40:01 PM »
I've noticed before, all over the internet, people saying "It's not news, it's opinions". To my understanding, these people's version of news is one that goes "The person traveled today from point A to point B and then he said this. And the other person received him and said that, good night", assuming that a casual viewer understands the implications of what has been said or the background of the event, while I think the vast majority of people won't.
To these people though, I suggest C-SPAN, they don't even tell you what's going on, they just show you live. It's all I watch when it comes to getting news from T.V, I've only discovered it a couple of years ago and initially didn't understand why it's not a more widely viewed station then I realized it's because it's not entertaining, supporting Lonestar's point.
I wouldn't want somebody with 18 kids to mow my damn lawn, based on a longstanding bias I have against crazy fucks.

Offline Podaar

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #25 on: August 17, 2019, 07:41:38 PM »
I trust my local newspaper completely. I can rely on it to start my charcoal every time.

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Re: How much do you trust the news media (here in the States)?
« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2019, 10:51:44 PM »
I assume that if something happens, locally or otherwise, who ever is doing the reporting is reporting what they know, or what they are allowed to know. I also assume that there are almost always facts that are withheld due to a privacy or investigatory nature.
would have thought the same thing but seeing the OP was TAC i immediately thought Maiden or DT related
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