Author Topic: The Yes Discography  (Read 54774 times)

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Offline ytserush

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #595 on: May 26, 2018, 01:39:53 PM »
Maybe it's me, but I don't see the problems with the sound of Going For The One that others do.  I tend to think that some of the earlier Yes was muddy and thick(er).   I like the sort of sparseness, and the way the guitar cuts through.   (And this coming from someone that feels Chris Squire was the heart and soul of the band, and feel that ABWH sounds like some here are describing GFTO.  ABWH misses Chris Squire like Jimmy Page misses Robert Plant.)

I don't know if it's the sound that bothers me about Going For The One. I think it's more of a vibe thing with me. The previous Yes albums (to me) seem to have a looser, happy-go-lucky kind of vibe to them which I don't really get with this album (or even Tormato for that matter)

It just strikes me as a very tense album (oddly and maybe in a similar way the Grace Under Pressure is (Rush seemed to channel that friction and make it work for them), but I don't know nearly enough about the history of making that album as I do Grace Under Pressure. I mean I've read "Close To The Edge-The Story of Yes" But that's really it and even that was years ago.)

I think there was some friction there with the label and maybe even some band members about finances and the like by this time, but I haven't read many accounts of that time period.


Offline jammindude

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #596 on: May 27, 2018, 11:55:27 AM »
Last night at the Weird Al show in Portland, I ran into an old school prog rock guy who was really into the early scene.  So obviously, we started a long discussion. 

He seemed rather sure that the issue with redoing anything with GFTO is that the master tapes had been lost.   Not sure where he heard that, but he seemed pretty knowledgeable on the subject.   

*IF* that is true, it may the reason Steven Wilson didn't do that album.
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Offline Architeuthis

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #597 on: May 27, 2018, 04:35:01 PM »
How was the weird Al show? I see that he's been doing his originals.
If weird Al did a Yes parody, what should it be?
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Offline Fritzinger

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #598 on: May 28, 2018, 01:51:43 AM »
That's interesting, didn't know that!

But I thin GFTO HAS been remastered, maybe the tapes have been lost AFTER that?  :huh:

If I recall correctly, SW only remasters albums he likes/loves, maybe this isn't one of them?
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Offline jammindude

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #599 on: May 28, 2018, 03:22:04 AM »
How was the weird Al show? I see that he's been doing his originals.
If weird Al did a Yes parody, what should it be?

 It was absolutely amazing! And I think I may have gotten the best set list on the entire tour! Midnight star, nature trail the hell, Albuquerque, Mr. Popiel, Horoscope...

Maybe I post pics tomorrow
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Offline Architeuthis

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #600 on: May 28, 2018, 07:37:35 AM »
That's great,  I saw Weird Al at the 5th Avenue a few years back and it was awesome!  One of my favorite songs he played was "The night Santa Went Crazy".....  :metal
You can do a lot in a lifetime if you don't burn out too fast, you can make the most of the distance, first you need endurance first you've got to last....... NP

Offline Stadler

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #601 on: May 28, 2018, 06:39:54 PM »
Maybe it's me, but I don't see the problems with the sound of Going For The One that others do.  I tend to think that some of the earlier Yes was muddy and thick(er).   I like the sort of sparseness, and the way the guitar cuts through.   (And this coming from someone that feels Chris Squire was the heart and soul of the band, and feel that ABWH sounds like some here are describing GFTO.  ABWH misses Chris Squire like Jimmy Page misses Robert Plant.)

I don't know if it's the sound that bothers me about Going For The One. I think it's more of a vibe thing with me. The previous Yes albums (to me) seem to have a looser, happy-go-lucky kind of vibe to them which I don't really get with this album (or even Tormato for that matter)

It just strikes me as a very tense album (oddly and maybe in a similar way the Grace Under Pressure is (Rush seemed to channel that friction and make it work for them), but I don't know nearly enough about the history of making that album as I do Grace Under Pressure. I mean I've read "Close To The Edge-The Story of Yes" But that's really it and even that was years ago.)

I think there was some friction there with the label and maybe even some band members about finances and the like by this time, but I haven't read many accounts of that time period.

Somewhere in a shoebox I have a tape that purports to be a session tape for the recording of the end section of Awaken.   Anderson is literally telling Wakeman what to play note for note (on the ending part where the keys seem to be ascending in a spiral).   While Wakeman plays all of it, seemingly without much complaint, it's a very weird vibe to hear.   Wakeman doesn't need people - especially someone as instrumentally challenged as Anderson, and with Anderson's people skills - telling him what to play. 

Online Orbert

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #602 on: May 28, 2018, 10:01:36 PM »
Sometimes someone has a song idea and it's really more like a sketch, with a lot of the details to be filled in by the other members of the band.  Give the guitarist an idea of what you have in mind, but basically let him work out exactly what he's gonna play.  Same with the keyboards, bass, and drums.  It all gets fleshed out in rehearsals and/or in the studio.  I don't know, but I would think that a lot of co-writing credits come from stuff like that, people contributing different stuff until it's clear that a significant part of the song came from different people.  But sometimes the songwriter has very specific things in mind that they feel is important to the song.  In a band situation, if you've got guys that are fine with working that way, I don't see the problem.  I mean, I found it a little weird that Mike Portnoy could tell James Labrie exactly how to sing his parts, but other people don't see anything wrong with that.  If that's how things work(ed) in a band, then who am I to think it's weird?

I know I've harped on this (no pun intended) many times, but basically Anderson saw himself as the leader of the band.  So it doesn't surprise me at all that he knew exactly what he wanted in some places, and Wakeman (who spent many years as a session musician, essentially just playing what he was told/paid to play) didn't have any issue with that.  And of course it helps that Anderson and Wakeman have immense respect for each other and love working together.  So Anderson says this is what he wants, Wakeman plays it.  Weird?  Maybe.  But if they're fine with it, then that's all that matters.

Offline jammindude

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #603 on: May 28, 2018, 11:01:58 PM »
Ya...to back up Orbert, and play devilís advocate....when I was in bands, I was the singer, but I ultimately ended up as the ďarrangerĒ as well.   I didnít tell guys what to play for the entire song, but if there was a moment that needed that special ďsomethingĒ, I might tell the drummer (beg if I had to) to please hit a hard crash cymbal *right on this one beat*....because it was super important. 

Maybe I was meant to be a producer more than a performer.   I know what sounds right and when it has to be done.
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Offline Stadler

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #604 on: May 29, 2018, 10:46:19 AM »
No, no, I get that, and totally agree.  I'm with you 100%, and that's what it means to be a team (and I believe, especially with LaBrie, that Portnoy pushing him made him a better singer).   I'm just offering evidence that it wasn't a matter of five guys jamming and doing what they want.    Really a contrast with, say, Fragile, where the band was largely done with the material and left "spaces" for Wakeman to do what he wanted on the underlying tracks. 

Offline ytserush

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #605 on: June 02, 2018, 08:31:51 AM »
Maybe it's me, but I don't see the problems with the sound of Going For The One that others do.  I tend to think that some of the earlier Yes was muddy and thick(er).   I like the sort of sparseness, and the way the guitar cuts through.   (And this coming from someone that feels Chris Squire was the heart and soul of the band, and feel that ABWH sounds like some here are describing GFTO.  ABWH misses Chris Squire like Jimmy Page misses Robert Plant.)

I don't know if it's the sound that bothers me about Going For The One. I think it's more of a vibe thing with me. The previous Yes albums (to me) seem to have a looser, happy-go-lucky kind of vibe to them which I don't really get with this album (or even Tormato for that matter)

It just strikes me as a very tense album (oddly and maybe in a similar way the Grace Under Pressure is (Rush seemed to channel that friction and make it work for them), but I don't know nearly enough about the history of making that album as I do Grace Under Pressure. I mean I've read "Close To The Edge-The Story of Yes" But that's really it and even that was years ago.)

I think there was some friction there with the label and maybe even some band members about finances and the like by this time, but I haven't read many accounts of that time period.

Somewhere in a shoebox I have a tape that purports to be a session tape for the recording of the end section of Awaken.   Anderson is literally telling Wakeman what to play note for note (on the ending part where the keys seem to be ascending in a spiral).   While Wakeman plays all of it, seemingly without much complaint, it's a very weird vibe to hear.   Wakeman doesn't need people - especially someone as instrumentally challenged as Anderson, and with Anderson's people skills - telling him what to play.

It seemed to work before (And I'm not saying it didn't work after for the most part) but I just always sensed a change with that album.

Tormato was even worse for me and there seemed to be a renewed sense of energy with Drama and beyond.

In general, it was becoming a lot more difficult  by the late '70s to be adventurous in your music and still remain as profitable as you had been before so I suppose that was a pressure that some may have worried about more than others.


Offline romdrums

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #606 on: June 08, 2018, 08:39:00 AM »
I'm listening to Tales for the second time this week.  I think this album is FINALLY starting to click with me.  I've had it for years, and I've made annual attempts to try and see if it will reveal its worth, and I think it finally paid off.  It's still bloated and somewhat disjointed, and I'm still really not a fan of The Ancient, but there are moments throughout this record that rank among the best Yes moments in their discography.  I think The Remembering is a somewhat underrated Yes epic and it's my favorite part of the record.  If I had to rank the four parts of the record it would look like this:

The Remembering
Ritual
The Revealing Science of God
The Ancient

I'm glad it has finally clicked for me.  I wonder if this is going to be the only album I'm going to listen to for the next few days!
Less isn't more when it's all that you know.

Online Orbert

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #607 on: June 08, 2018, 10:53:08 AM »
I'm glad it has finally clicked for you, too!  It's a huge, sprawling, often daunting album, but if it works for you, then it's 80+ minutes of amazingness.

Offline romdrums

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #608 on: June 08, 2018, 11:17:10 AM »
I've been on a bit of a Yes binge lately.  I had an epic Yes playlist that I listened to on Sunday while doing yard work that really kicked it off for me.  I've since listened to Tales twice this week and I'm working through Relayer right now.  I first discovered Relayer back in 1991, and it grabbed me right away.  I would have loved to have another Yes album with Moraz on keys.  I think he brought a really interesting take on the keyboard position in Yes, and it really seemed to fire up the band.
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Online Orbert

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #609 on: June 08, 2018, 03:28:45 PM »
I agree.  In some ways, Patrick Moraz was "the Derek Shirinian" of Yes.  Yes had Wakeman, Wakeman left so they got Moraz, Wakeman became available again so they dumped Moraz and took Wakeman back.

Various members of Yes have gone on record saying that it just wasn't working, blah blah blah, but Relayer is a favorite of a lot of Yesfans, and Moraz is a big part of that.  As second album with Moraz, after they'd settled in and figured out how to work together better, could have been really cool.

Offline stargazer18

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #610 on: June 09, 2018, 07:31:03 AM »
I agree with your statement that some of the music on this album is some of the best that they have done. The more I listen the more I find I like. It's just hard to find 80 minutes to sit and listen to all at once.


I'm listening to Tales for the second time this week.  I think this album is FINALLY starting to click with me.  I've had it for years, and I've made annual attempts to try and see if it will reveal its worth, and I think it finally paid off.  It's still bloated and somewhat disjointed, and I'm still really not a fan of The Ancient, but there are moments throughout this record that rank among the best Yes moments in their discography.  I think The Remembering is a somewhat underrated Yes epic and it's my favorite part of the record.  If I had to rank the four parts of the record it would look like this:

The Remembering
Ritual
The Revealing Science of God
The Ancient

I'm glad it has finally clicked for me.  I wonder if this is going to be the only album I'm going to listen to for the next few days!

Offline stargazer18

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #611 on: June 09, 2018, 07:41:14 AM »
Part 4 Ė 1990ís to Today

I graduated from High School in 1990. During my junior and senior years I got introduced to Led Zepplin and Pink Floyd by a friend and spent some time exploring each bands discography. I also picked up CDís by the Eagles and Kansas as I continued to expand my music collection from just hard rock and metal. So when I heard Lift Me Up on the radio I knew I would get the new Yes album when it came out.

Union

I know many donít think highly of this album but I think itís pretty solid. The only song I donít care for is Dangerous (Look In The Light Of What You're Searching For).  If Iím not in the mood Iíll skip Angkor Wat Ė itís pretty cool and atmospheric  but I donít listen to it every time.  The rest is pretty good stuff.

Talk

This was another new album for me and I was very excited to check it out based on comments I read. It wasnít until I listened to it that I realized Iíd heard The Calling on the radio when Talk came out. I Am Waiting is another top shelf song. Real Love starts with (to me) a really annoying keyboard melody that makes me hit skip every time I hear it. It just does nothing for me. For this review I listened to the whole song and there are some redeeming parts to it after getting through the first two minutes or so. I get why others like it. Itís mostly up from here to the end of the album for me: State Of Play is good, Walls is okay, Where Will You Be is good and Endless Dream is phenomenal! I donít know if I would call it the best of the three but it rounds out the trifecta of Rabin Era albums on a very high note.

Keys To Ascension

Iím one of those who happened to get the 4 CD / 1 DVD box set because it was the only copy I could find. Iíve since seen various versions of the packaging show up at Ďthe DenĒ in the past few years but not the box set. To me, the studio tracks are a return to form of sorts with a modern polished sound. I like every song. The long form / epic tracks donít sound padded out or overlong to me and IMO sound like a natural evolution to what they did in the 70ís.
I know this is heresy but I actually like some of the live tracks and hereís why. I typically donít listen to live albums because of the lack of quality. (Besides, having seen them in concert I know the statement ďyou had to be thereĒ applies to Yes) There are some live albums I like but not many. I like some of the Keys tracks because they overdubbed and cleaned up the sound. Yes, they are not really live but they are not really studio and that is why I like the sound. It's different.

Open Your Eyes

I donít have a copy of this album but I pulled it up YouTube and gave it a listen. Itís not as bad as I expected based on comments I read. Most of the songs have the sound of the short form style that they had been making since the 80ís. Every band I listen to makes a style of song that I donít like Ė for Yes this would be New State of Mind. It has the clunky, plodding beat that just turns me off. Best few are Open Your Eyes, Universal Garden, Wonderlove and From the Balcony. To be honest I could put it on in the background and only skip a few songs. If I can find a cheap copy Iíll pick this up on CD.

The Ladder

I like this album a lot and consider it on par with Keys To Ascension. The short form songs are all really good Ė no clunky, plodding ones here.  But, there is some real diversity that I can see would turn a purist off. Lightning Strikes and Can I incorporate that ďworld musicĒ concept that has always been an element in prog. Both are enjoyable to me even though they are a bit out of my usual music taste.  It Will Be A Good Day, Face To Face, If Only You Knew, To Be Alive, Finally and The Messenger are all really good and contain some really nice music and vocal melodies.

Both long form songs are excellent Ė long enough to develop but not padded out.

Both Keys To Ascension and The Ladder have the modern, contemporary feel of the 70ís era Yes music to me. It doesnít sound re-hashed and shows the band could evolve beyond their early years. Itís not as bold a statement as it should have been because they only put out these two albums before changing again.

Magnification

Iíve only listened to this album twice. There are a few songs that stand out but thereís nothing I have heard so far that really grabs me. Itís one that I can put on in the background while working and enjoy.

Symphonic Live
I got it, and I like it! The sound is fantastic and you get Close to the Edge, The Gates of Delirium and Ritual in one package - nothing more to say.

Fly From Here

Since I like Drama I was really interested in hearing this album. For the most part itís good to excellent with The Man You Always Wanted Me To Be and Hour Of Need being the only songs I skip sometimes. Theyíre not bad but definitely arenít very Yes sounding to me by a long stretch.

The epic is excellent Ė bumpy ride doesnít derail the song to me as much as others feel it does. The rest of the short form songs are diverse enough and sound pretty good.

Iíll admit that I have not listened to Heaven & Earth and will refrain from doing so based on what Iíve read here. In my mind I am going to let the current line up end their tenure on a high note!

Many thanks to Orbert and everyone else who contributed to this thread Ė as a result Iíve added hours of incredible new music to my library and greatly expanded my enjoyment of music.

Yes was just the beginning of adding new music to my collection though and I then moved on to another big 70ís progressive rock band discography threadÖ

Offline Ninjabait

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #612 on: June 09, 2018, 08:05:49 AM »
Y'know, reading through your journey of discovery through Yes's discography kind of makes me want to go back and listen or re-listen to a lot of the albums I haven't gotten around to listening.

Also, re: Bumpy Ride: I honestly don't mind it when it comes on shuffle by its self, it's a fun and kooky song and it's not badly written by any means. But to me, when I listen to Fly From Here, I feel like it just comes out of nowhere when I go through the whole suite. It doesn't really fit in with the tone of the rest of the song for me, and the transition to it feels so sloppy.

Online Orbert

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #613 on: June 09, 2018, 09:27:07 AM »
I get what they were going for with "Bumpy Ride".  There are examples of a long-form thing by other bands, and before the big recap there's a crazy section with weird timings and stuff.  To me, that's "Bumpy Ride".  And yeah, it's pretty well done as a piece and I don't mind it.  But when it comes up in the suite, I can't help but think that this is the part they put in because it's the crazy section before the big recap.  It doesn't feel like it came up organically.

But if you follow the analogy of the song suite to an airplane ride, turbulence does come out of nowhere and for some reason seems to happen towards the end of the flight a lot of the time.  So maybe it's supposed to be like that.  I don't know; I just thought of that.

Offline Fritzinger

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #614 on: June 09, 2018, 09:35:09 AM »
I get what they were going for with "Bumpy Ride".  There are examples of a long-form thing by other bands, and before the big recap there's a crazy section with weird timings and stuff.  To me, that's "Bumpy Ride".  And yeah, it's pretty well done as a piece and I don't mind it.  But when it comes up in the suite, I can't help but think that this is the part they put in because it's the crazy section before the big recap.  It doesn't feel like it came up organically.

But if you follow the analogy of the song suite to an airplane ride, turbulence does come out of nowhere and for some reason seems to happen towards the end of the flight a lot of the time.  So maybe it's supposed to be like that.  I don't know; I just thought of that.

I feel like the whole suite is not organic. It's a suite because Yes wanted to include a long song on the album. I agree on what you're saying, a lot of bands put in crazy parts before the huge reprise (Supper's Ready, Octavarium, In The Presence Of Enemies, Illumination Theory, Ritual, probably about 92 Neal Morse epics). I always felt that Bumpy Ride was supposed to be something like this. But I also find it extremely bland, almost childish with its I-IV-V harmonies. It doesn't work as a standalone track for me either.
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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #615 on: June 09, 2018, 11:11:01 AM »
I feel like the whole suite is not organic. It's a suite because Yes wanted to include a long song on the album.
True.  When I first heard that they'd taken a leftover tune from Drama and somehow made it into an epic, I had my doubts, and when I saw/heard the results, I wasn't really surprised.  But I've come to accept it because I like the sound of this lineup and of this album.  It's not really top-tier songwriting.

It doesn't work as a standalone track for me either.
That one's harder for me to judge.  I never shuffle bits of suites; they're always concatenated into a single track before going onto the iPod.  It serves its purpose in the suite, which is the most important thing, and as I said, I've come to accept it.  I suppose that that just underscores how truly cobbled-together the thing is in the first place.  But I'm a Yes fanboy.  I like these guys and the way they play, even if what they're playing is kinda crap.

Offline ytserush

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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #616 on: June 13, 2018, 07:19:29 PM »
Always enjoyed Sides 3 and 4  (disc 2) of Tales more.


I keep forgetting that I really need to get some Union Live releases. Always liked the album, but even though I saw the show I always forget how much fun they were having and how much of a music festival that tour really was.  I'm not much of a fan of Awaken as most people are, but I still think that's the best version of that I've ever heard. 

I really like the music of Anderson Bruford Wakeman and Howe and what they did with it live, but the Union Tour just seemed on a whole other plane of existence from that given the augmented guitars, keys and drums.


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Re: The Yes Discography
« Reply #617 on: June 13, 2018, 10:03:33 PM »
Yeah, the Union tour was cool because of the big sound.  That was the one and only time I've seen Yes, probably the only time I ever will, but it was a good one.