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General => Reviews => Topic started by: Ultimetalhead on January 01, 2011, 02:44:12 PM

Title: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 01, 2011, 02:44:12 PM
Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 00: Mission Statement
The genre of guitar virtuoso shred music is not a very popular one. However, the genre is rather populated in that there are quite a few musicians who pride themselves in showing that they are the best shredders on the planet, and they donít need a silly band to back them up. Some of them get the respect they deserve, but never get the mainstream treatment, and some of them just fade off into obscurity because quite frankly nobody cares. Buckethead is probably in the middle ground. Most people Iíve talked to have never heard of him, but anyone who has heard even one of his albums usually agrees that heís easily one of the most criminally underrated guitarists in history.

One of the big reasons for this is the sheer variety of his playing. A lot of shred guitarists are one trick ponies. Yngwie certainly falls into that category, even if heíll pop out a ballad or a traditional metal song every now and then (granted, I love what he does but heís certainly not varied in his ideas). Satch and Vai branch out quite a bit as well, but absolutely nobody does it quite like Buckethead. Do you want an instrumental metal album that will shred your jaws off? Cuckoo Clocks of Hell. Do you want a calm, relaxing experience? Colma. Do you want your eardrums to be completely and totally ravaged by the most insane music anyone has ever created? Inbred Mountain. Do you want to know what a shred guitarist would sound like if you gave him a banjo? Spinal Clock. He does it all, and most importantly, he does it well.

Anyway, the reason Iím talking about Buckethead hasnít exactly been made clear. Since Buckethead is so underrated and unrecognized, and since everybody Iíve ever recommended him to has thanked me at some point, I intend to review every single album in this manís impressive solo discography. 30 albums, and one 13 disc monolith box set that very few have survived through (and heĎll probably release 3 more before IĎm done). Iím out to give this man the justice he deserves, and also to help improve my writing, since this is not going to be a short project. Iím expecting this to take the entire year, because trying to get through 50 discs of material in a short time frame is nothing short of suicide, and Iím not going to settle for stupid reviews that cover no ground and just say ďit was cool, 3/5Ē. Every single album is going to get the same in-depth treatment, even if it kills me. That said, feel free to constructively criticize my writing, because Iím all about improvement.

Iíll be honest here, Iíve heard all of his albums, but Iím definitely not familiar enough with them to just run through them. Another reason Iíve decided to do this is to further explore the manís discography myself. Iím looking forward to getting started on this project, and I hope at least a few people will follow this massive project.

Here is the list of the albums I'm reviewing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckethead#Discography (Note, KFC Skin Piles is not in my possession, and as such will not be reviewed).

The first review is done and will appear shortly.  :)
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 01, 2011, 02:55:31 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Bucketheadland
Genre: Avant Garde Metal
Year: 1992

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 01: Bucketheadland

Wel-come-to-buck-et-head-land

That pretty much sets the tone for the entire album, really. Buckethead slides his hand down the guitar and launches his MIDI band into action. Our hero whips up some of the coolest riffs Iíve ever heard. Several different, but equally amusing vocal samples lie on top of the music, giving some listeners their first dose of Bucketheadís history (Buckethead was raised in a chicken coop by chickens, for those who donít know). The song continues on in traditional verse-chorus fare until the solo comes out of nowhere and tears your face right off. Personally, the solo on this song has a really interesting effect on me. The first time I heard it (this was one of the first songs I had ever heard from Buckethead) was an amazing experience. The way the opening note grinds in, followed by an absolute flurry of awesomeness absolutely defines Bucketheadís soloing, and it sort of sets the tone for his entire discography. The chord progression used here is used plenty of times in Bucketheadís later material. This song, and a good amount of later tracks absolutely reek of a young guitar player showing the world why they should be paying extra special attention to him. The solos are hell bent on being flashy, but never (okay, maybe sometimes) to the point of being self-indulgent and unnecessary. The riffs are awesome and heavy when they do pop up, but the main focus is obviously on the solos. There are a few tracks where the sole intention was to listen to a little vocal sample and then promptly have your brain melted by a shred festival, which I of course feel thereís nothing wrong with (See ďNosinĎĒ parts 1 and 2). The actual structured songs are few and far between, but they are easily the highlights of the album for me. Of course, one would be insane not to mention the classic, albeit far too short ďI Love My ParentsĒ which is probably one of the most fantastic soft songs Buckethead has ever recorded.

So, now that Iíve covered the guitar work (arguably the most important part), howís the backing band? Well, the word Iíd use is robotic. The drums are programmed, and I believe Buckethead also played the bass. The drums do well to set and maintain the atmosphere of the album. It all sounds wonderfully electronic. A lot of people really hate electronic drums (mostly drummers, go figure), but this is one of those albums where I feel that it really works and adds something to the songs. Itís definitely not for everybody though. The bass does a good job of making itself noticeable without overpowering the guitar. Itís definitely more present than in a ton of other metal albums, but itís never up front except for one small solo in Computer Master. The other huge component of this album, and a few of his later albums, is the vocal samples. Since Bucketheadís music is largely instrumental, the vocal samples do great to add another dynamic to music which some would find stagnant.

The story of the album is quite simple. Buckethead is building an amusement park, and the album is split into sections representing the sections of the park. I admit, I donít pay all that much attention to when one section is beginning or ending, since thereís never a real stylistic shift. It all comes back to the shred every time.

And now, the best song on the album: I choose Computer Master. Itís the longest track on the album, and it does an absolutely fantastic job of touching all the ground that the album covers without missing anything. It has the vocal samples, heavy riffs, shred, and even a quiet section to cover ďI Love My ParentsĒ.

For starting fans, itís a really tough call. I started with this album, and I loved it, but Iíve always been kind of OCD about exploring discographies. There are definitely better albums to start with to give you a better picture of what Buckethead is capable of, but at the same time I think this one is as good of a starting point as any. It gives any willing listener a taste of the greatness that was to come, all the while introducing you to the magical world of Bucketheadland.

4.5/5 The album is fantastic, but better things were to come.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: jsem on January 01, 2011, 05:37:19 PM
Bucketheadland is a fantastic album
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: glaurung on January 01, 2011, 08:26:16 PM
I only just started listening to him so I might not comment much for now but as the year goes on I'll have more to add.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 08, 2011, 04:55:38 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Giant Robot
Genre: Avant Garde Metal
Year: 1994

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 02: Giant Robot

Giant Robot, Bucketheadís second solo album, is best described as difficult to describe. Itís not entirely clear if this is meant to be a re-imagining of Bucketheadland, or simply a continuation. It could also be perceived as a fresh start after what some might consider a weak first album (as we know, I consider it quite a good debut). Then again, it can also be viewed as a collection of odds and ends that Buckethead wanted to commit to tape before he really started to branch out. The main reason for the confusion is basically that a lot of these songs have been heard before. Thereís a new version of ďIntro - Park ThemeĒ from the previous album, appropriately named ďWelcome to BucketheadlandĒ. ďI Come in PeaceĒ is a direct reworking of a song by Bucketheadís first band, The Deli Creeps. Speaking of The Deli Creeps, there is also an instrumental version of an unreleased song of theirs called ďBinge & GrabĒ (One of the albumís happier cuts). Again, there are some short tracks including a Willy Wonka vocoder song and a Star Wars ditty. To round off the repeats, there is an extended (and much improved) ďI Love My ParentsĒ. That said, itís pretty obvious that this album is going to cover a myriad of different styles. As such, this is one of the perfect albums for a beginning Buckethead fan to check out.

The guitar sound on this album is extremely crunchy, and one of my favorite guitar tones on any of Bucketheadís works. Look no further than the main riff of ďI Come in PeaceĒ for the full crunch experience. The blistering solos are still here and as devastating as before. The opener, ďDoomrideĒ, treats listeners to a magnificent shred fest that echoes the feeling of ďIntro - Park ThemeĒ on Bucketheadland: a young guitarist who was obviously told to pick up a guitar and play something that will make people sit down and listen for the next 70 minutes. Yes, this is an extremely long album, especially by Buckethead standards. As mentioned before, there are tons of different styles at work here. ďPost Office BuddyĒ has some of the most fearsome riffing weíve heard out of Buckethead up to this point, and ďLast Train to BucketheadlandĒ evokes a feeling of pure relaxation offset by a lunatic screaming his lungs out. Thereís always something new happening, never a dull moment.

As far as our backup band, we have a little bit more interaction this time around. The drums are no longer MIDI, leaving them to sound much more authentic. Drums are obviously not the draw of the album, but they hit hard and do their job very well. The bass is handled by the outrageously talented Bootsy Collins on some tracks. He gives some of the best funky bass lines Iíve ever heard on ďBucketheadís Toy StoreĒ. Both the bass and drums do excellently at keeping their place and letting Buckethead stretch out his shred whenever he deems necessary.

Again, this album has vocal bits much like its predecessor. The main difference here is that the album is much more song oriented, so the short songs with a sample and a shred-take are more or less absent. The vocal bits are spliced into the songs, making the songs and samples feel much more cohesive. This combined with the fact that the vocalizations are just plain more entertaining this time around makes for a huge improvement.

And now, the long awaited Song of the Album: I have to go with ďPost Office BuddyĒ, a lyrical riff festival that paints a perfect picture of a madman at home lusting after a girl who supposedly gave him her number. As the man grows more and more frustrated at his being ignored, the songís intensity picks up. The riffs here are some of Bucketheadís best, without a doubt. I wonít spoil anything about the vocals, but know that this is the absolute pinnacle of old Buckethead insanity.

Unfortunately, even though this album sounds like the perfect blend of Bucketheadís many styles, some sections tend to drag quite a bit. Warweb and Aquabot come to mind. If the album was perhaps missing those songs, it would without a doubt be a perfect score. Sadly, it will just have to settle for being the ultimate introduction to Bucketheadís instrumental madness.

4.5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: jsem on January 08, 2011, 05:01:22 PM
This is a truly great album.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on January 09, 2011, 03:48:03 PM
Bucketheadland is a pretty great debut album. I mean, it's got all of the things I love about Buckethead. But the production bothers me a tad. It's not bad, but distracting. Though you got Giant Robot just about spot on for me. I fucking love that album to death.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 09, 2011, 03:50:24 PM
I really don't mind the production on the album. It's not good enough for me to mention, but it's not bad enough for me to mention either.  :P
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 13, 2011, 07:06:14 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Day of the Robot
Genre: Avant-Garde Metal
Year: 1996

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 03: Day of the Robot

And so weíve arrived at Day of the Robot. This album, while the title may seem like a sequel of sorts to the previous album, is Bucketheadís first major stylistic shifts. However, unlike the examples we are to see later, this one was never revisited. This album is a lot more serious than its predecessors. Itís much more focused on its songs rather than the vocal bits and general insanity from the previous two projects. Thereís not a single vocal sample on the entire album, leaving Bucketheadís riffs and solos to fill up most of the musical space. This time around, instead of hiring what seemed like a whole family tree of contributors, Buckethead sticks with Ninj on the bass, drums, and keyboards and Bill Laswell on drums and ďlow bassĒ.

By this point, itís already pretty easy to guess that the guitar playing on this album is top-notch. Buckethead never fails to impress in the riff department, the first 3 minutes of Destroyer give great credence to that statement. As far as his solos are concerned, I am again amazed at the sheer speed and technicality that Buckethead plays with. To top it all off, heís still clean as a whistle. No note seems like it was played by accident, and even in the midst of the insane shredding, every single tone cuts through like a dagger.

Many Buckethead fans refer to this album affectionately as his ďjungleĒ album, and itís quite obvious why. Ninj and Laswell use their tools to their full advantage, creating a unique blend of avant-garde metal and drum and bass. However strange this marriage may sound on paper, it actually works surprisingly well. Iíll be the first to admit that Iím not exactly well versed in electronic music, but I know good music when I hear it. This new dimension is something I enjoy quite a bit. The background effects tend to take up more space as the album progresses, leading up to one of the coolest bass riffs Iíve ever heard on Collision. Personally, Iím a sucker for progression when it comes to an album, and this one does it right.

Now, as for the best song, I have to give the award to Destroyer. This song does everything an intro needs to do. It sets the groundwork with some absolutely delicious riffs, giving off the impression that this might be an album similar to Giant Robot, but more mature and serious. Then, halfway through the song, the drums and bass come in and do very well to show off the new sound. The soloing is flawless and jaw-dropping, as expected.

I donít really have a lot of specific complaints with this one. I mean, itís all great music, but some of the sections could have used a bit of a trim (whole songs really, not a whole lot of in-song progression), and the drum bits can get quite repetitive.

Overall, this album is a great experiment that produced some good music, but itís not too hard to see why this direction hasnít been explored further.

4/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on January 13, 2011, 07:12:35 PM
I've actually never really cared for Day of the Robot all that much. It's one of those albums, at least to me, where he completely delved into the realm of experimentation in order to create one big trip. Though I must say, I do enjoy Flying Guillotine and Quantum Crash quite a bit.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 13, 2011, 07:26:16 PM
Definitely agreed there. I think a big part of enjoying the album is if you've had a history of enjoying techno in the past, which I have.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: jsem on January 14, 2011, 01:49:06 AM
Definitely agreed there. I think a big part of enjoying the album is if you've had a history of enjoying techno in the past, which I have.
I totally don't have a history of techno appreciation. lol

I don't think this is a good BH album to be frank.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 16, 2011, 08:13:15 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Colma
Genre: Avant-Garde
Year: 1998

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 04: Colma

At this point on our musical excursion, weíve heard three albums all very focused on metal and general insanity. Colma brings us another stylistic shift to smooth jazz and an overall relaxed atmosphere. The album has a very emotional vibe through and through, being that Buckethead recorded the album for his mother who was recovering from cancer at the time. Indeed, itís very difficult not to get lost in this albumís simple beauty. Even while Iím writing this review, the soothing melodies are making me zone out in an almost hypnotic state. Itís really incredible how Buckethead can make an album with so much space, so open, and still have it be every bit as interesting as when heís playing 20 notes per second. I feel that is the trademark of a truly skilled musician. This album could easily be recommended as a beginnerís album, and definitely the first ďquietĒ album that fans should hear.

As youíve probably figured out by now, the guitar work on this album is not overtly shredtastic like many of Bucketheadís other albums. The guitar is very much focused on melody and not so much on the riffs. The vast majority of the album is nothing short of completely gorgeous. Thatís not to say Buckethead doesnít show off his chops. Big Sur Moon is about a minute and a half of acoustic shredding, an absolute masterpiece in Bucketheadís catalog. Buckethead accomplishes more in a minute with a clean tone and some delay than most guitar players can hope to reach in their lifetimes. Miraculously, the entire album goes by without once feeling like itís meandering or becoming too self-indulgent, another trademark of a skilled guitarist.

The rhythm section is very minimalist this time, to fit in snugly with the beautiful guitar work. For the most part, it sounds great and doesnít overpower the guitar. There are a few spots where I think the drums could have been turned down a touch, but itís not nearly bad enough to hurt the overall quality of the album.

The best song on this album is literally impossible to pick. I will feel terrible about leaving the other out either way, so the song of the album is: For Mom and Hills of Eternity. Both of these songs perfectly capture the emotion and the general vibe that is Colma. The melodies are simple, infectious, and packed with the kind of beauty that you can only get with a guitar. These songs are a part of Bucketheadís God tier of music, and will stay there forever.

The only remotely negative thing I can think about with this album is the title track. Itís not a calm, soothing beauty like the rest of the songs. Itís an ambient track with some bursts of sound effects that some listeners might find off-putting. Since I donít necessarily have a problem with the song, the overall rating is actually quite simple to decide.

5/5


Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on January 16, 2011, 08:35:27 PM
Excellent review :tup. Hills of Eternity is easily one of my favourite Buckethead songs. I also am extremely fond of Big Sur Moon. Particularly because it's one of those songs where with the right atmosphere will put you on the most perfect euphoric state of all time (even though the song only lasts about a minute). Example, one time at a friends house we were having a bonfire, and I decided to play Colma on the speakers we brought outside. When Big Sur Moon hit, I found myself looking upwards at the sky and stars. For that minute, everything was okay. Everything.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 16, 2011, 08:37:26 PM
It's moments like that which tend to make a song resonate with you forever. I wish I had more of them.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: orcus116 on January 16, 2011, 11:29:46 PM
Only album of his I have but it's begging for another listen. I really dug it the first time around.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: jsem on January 17, 2011, 08:18:06 AM
Drums could've been better imo. Whitewash & Hills of Eternity share almost identical drum tracks, just different tempos.

Amazing album though, best relax album ever.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on January 18, 2011, 09:06:14 AM
The drums felt like a secondary thing anyway. They were simply there to develop a rhythm.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 25, 2011, 06:57:32 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Monsters & Robots
Genre: Avant-Garde Metal
Year: 1999

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 05: Monsters & Robots
This is one of the albums that really defines Bucketheadís overall sound, for me. Every style heís touched on in the past (from the electronic/dance vibe on Day of the Robot to the soothing sounds of Colma) is well represented here. This album is more like Giant Robot in that it doesnít have much of an over-arching theme. Indeed, itís more of a collection of high quality songs. Even though it might sound like a grab bag, the album flows well and it doesnít seem like the transitions were too forced. Beautiful, brutal, and shred-tacular, Monsters & Robots delivers on all fronts.

The guitar playing on this album, as weíve come to expect, is astounding, jaw-dropping, insane. Every superlative I use isnít doing the man a service. Heís a fabulous player, and if you still donít think so, quite frankly, youíre wrong. The riffs on this album are nice and heavy in songs like Revenge of the Double-Man and Jowls. The guitar tone on the record isnít quite as crunchy as his earlier material, but Iíve always preferred his smoother tones, and this disc is a fine example of why. These songs just feel good. Theyíre fun to listen to, and they never really get stale because of the stylistic jumping. The solos are incredibly shreddy. Almost every song has a section devoted to the master doing what he does best. Personally, I find this to be one of the albumís biggest draws, but if youíre looking for more melodic playing, itís certainly here, but you may want to stick with Colma. There is one particularly beautiful moment on the song ďWho Me?Ē. This song echoes the aforementioned Colma in every sense of the definition, and almost sounds like it was intended for Colma instead. It fits in rather well here, serving as almost an intermission between the two insane halves of the album.

The backing band on this outing sounds phenomenal. The drums give the songs a nice, driving beat, almost giving off a dance vibe. I could certainly picture a song like Jump Man or Night of the Slunk playing at a club on a late night (then again, IĎm a wishful thinker). The bass isnít quite as prevalent on this record, but thereís certainly spots where itís allowed to jump out of the mix and shine. The keyboards and effects on this album are nothing short of awesome. They do exactly what theyíre meant to. They add a bunch of texture and atmosphere to a song, without taking the focus away from Bucketheadís playing. A song like Stick Pit wouldnít be the same without those blips and bloops. Special mention must be given to The Ballad of Buckethead, one of the only Buckethead songs to predominately feature vocals. The vocals and bass on the track are played by Les Claypool, so you can figure out right away that this is going to sound like a Primus song with a Buckethead solo, and it certainly does. Itís not a bad song by any means, but itís probably my least favorite here.

The vocal bits are back on this album, whether you missed them or not. Personally, I love them. They add a great touch to the album, and keeps it very interesting. Most of the songs have samples, and they definitely make the songs seem more like songs rather than random jamming. My favorite bit has to be in Jowls with the maniacal screaming of ďSAVE ME THE SLUNK!!!Ē before Buckethead tears it up.

The coveted song of the album award goes straight to Night of the Slunk, no questions asked. Itís one of the ultimate Buckethead songs, for me at least. It starts off with a great clean riff, before the keyboard comes in and makes things interesting. Later, it breaks off into a great heavy riff, jumping back and forth until the spotlight is shifted to one of my all time favorite Buckethead solos. Totally flawless.

If youíve never heard a Buckethead album before, this is the one you need to hear. It gives a crash course in all of his many styles, and manages to be an extremely entertaining, mostly instrumental album. Quite a feat, indeed.

5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on January 25, 2011, 07:11:30 PM
Night of the Slunk is easily my favourite track from M&R as well. Though, Jump Man and The Shape vs. Buckethead are fairly close behind. Also, am I the only person who thinks that there are a lot of bits and pieces to this album that have very...Jordan-esque moments? Like, riffs and pedal usage that sound a lot like moments in the song Jordan. Maybe it's just me.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 25, 2011, 07:16:57 PM
Night of the Slunk is easily my favourite track from M&R as well. Though, Jump Man and The Shape vs. Buckethead are fairly close behind. Also, am I the only person who thinks that there are a lot of bits and pieces to this album that have very...Jordan-esque moments? Like, riffs and pedal usage that sound a lot like moments in the song Jordan. Maybe it's just me.
Absolutely. I believe the "Bucket-tapping" first showed up in Jump Man, which is heavily featured in Jordan. That, and Jordan has a very similar main riff. It wouldn't surprise me if those songs were written close together.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: jsem on January 26, 2011, 03:07:09 AM
This album is epically funky and awesome. Good review man...


Edit: No, he's not using pedals for the Jordan effect :facepalm:

He's using a killswitch, it kills the guitar temporarily so no sound is transfered to the amplifier when the button is held down. It's quite easy to construct. It's simiilar to pulling your cable out and putting it back in, but with less effort.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 31, 2011, 07:19:30 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Somewhere Over the Slaughterhouse
Genre: Avant-Garde Metal
Year: 2001

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 06: Somewhere Over the Slaugherhouse

Starting off with a slightly twisted rendition of ďSomewhere Over the RainbowĒ, it becomes quite apparent that this album is going to be a goofy trip. However, this album differs slightly in that itís not goofy in the sense of his previous works. Albums like Giant Robot and Monsters & Robots were goofy in the sense of the vocal bits and the general madness pervading the intricate music. This album is more goofy in that itís focused much more on the electronic backing than the man we know and love. This gives it a decidedly ďDay of the RobotĒ feel, only much more focused. Some of the songs get a little repetitive, but overall this is a fairly consistent outing.

Thereís not much shred to be found in the guitar work this time around. The only real shred comes around the albumís midpoint, particularly in Burlapís Curtain, seemingly just to remind us that Buckethead can still shred with the best of them, and is just taking a bit of a break, a shred siesta, if you will. The heavy riffage isnít nearly as prevalent either, but when it appears itís all the more enjoyable. The riffs in Help Me fit right in with the slightly uncomfortable background, and makes the song better. A good chunk of the album is littered with clean playing. My Sheetz, one of the better songs on the album, is chock full of Big Sur Moon-esque delay and mesmerizing playing. Overall, the guitar playing is quite varied, and it keeps the album interesting.

The backing band isÖthere. Personally, I find myself focusing more on the electronic ambience more than anything else with this one. Sure, the bass and drums are there, but the keyboard patches are what give this album the atmosphere and the flavoring to make it work so well. As mentioned above, some of the songs are pretty unsettling, and it wouldnít be anywhere near the same without the keyboards. I might even go so far as to say the keyboards are actually more important than the guitar on this one.

As far as the best song on the album, Iíll have to give it to Help Me. The looped sampling of, what a surprise, ďHelp MeĒ, combined with the drum beats and the main keyboard loop, give the song a great vibe. Then, the heavy, down-tuned (This might be the first time Buckethead went lower than standard E on an album. Iíll have to look into that) riffs jump in every once in a while. It provides great contrast, and makes the song instantly memorable. The riff that breaks half-way through the song is insanely good as well.

Again, here I go singing an albumís praises, making it look like thereís not all that much wrong with it. Sadly, Ďtis not the case. The songs can get incredibly repetitive, and even with the consistently changing styles, they tend to run together. Itís definitely not for new Buckethead fans, either, as itís not at all representative of the majority of his output. Iíd say this is more for the hardcore fan who enjoyed Day of the Robot and wants to hear what else Buckethead could do within the realm of electronic music.

3.5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on February 06, 2011, 03:18:27 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Funnel Weaver
Genre: Avant-Garde Metal
Year: 2002

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 07: Funnel Weaver

If an artist as majestically eclectic as Buckethead could have an album worthy of being called a black sheep, Funnel Weaver would probably be my first pick. This isnít so much an album as it is a collection of songs, and itís not so much a collection of songs as it is a collection of ideas. To me, this album reads more as an assembly of ideas that never got off the ground. Not a single song is longer than 3 minutes, and as such, the album can tend to run together. There is good to be found on this album if you feel like sifting through the graveyard, truly a challenge to even the most hardcore of fan boys.

This review has already taken on a slightly negative tone, but thereís definitely something to love here, particularly in the guitar department. If you were a fan of the riffs you heard on earlier albums like Giant Robot, youíll find plenty of those here. Most songs seem like they could be an intro section to something much greater. Take the song Combat Shadow for example. Itís a delightfully chunky riff, that repeats a few times as the listener begins to get anxious for the next bit. Then, itís over, and another little intro starts up. Itís kind of a disappointment. Take that feeling, multiply it by 49, and youíve got the album in a nutshell. Thereís not a whole lot of shredding or even melodic soloing to be found here, since the songs are never around long enough to establish a catchy motif. But, there are a few songs that have a bit of melody to them, and it feels like a breath of fresh air. Unfortunately, it doesnít happen nearly enough to warrant any more than a few listens.

As far as the backing band is concerned, if thereís not enough time to establish a melody, thereís certainly not enough time to listen to whatís going on behind it. Thereís not much to miss, anyway. A lot of the songs feel like they have the exact same drum beat. Probably the albumís biggest strength is the sampling and the effects used periodically throughout the album. The Worm Turns, a very experimental ditty, would not have been out of place on Bucketheadís previous album, Somewhere Over the Slaughterhouse. Itís quite electronic, and the effects add quite a bit of atmosphere to the mix. Sadly, like all the other cool bits on the album, it is gone as quickly as one can grow to like it.

Thereís not very many candidates for song of the album on this one, partially because thereís no traditional songs on the disc. If Buckethead came into my house right now, and said that if I picked my favorite track from Funnel Weaver, heíd give me private guitar lessons for the rest of my life, Iíd probably go with Bantam Rising. Itís got one of the few melodies on the album, and itís got that classic Buckethead feel to it. Itís pretty easily the strongest moment on the album, if only it lasted a bit longer.

It might seem like I really donít like this album, and thatís definitely a solid conclusion. However, thereís certainly potential here. The reason I donít care for the album is not for the music, itís more for the album as a whole. Itís extremely cumbersome, and almost impossible to listen to in one sitting. One of the things thatís so frustrating about this album is that it could have been an insanely good collection of music had the songs been fleshed out and given the full-length treatment. To this day, I anxiously await the day that Buckethead decides to take all the riffs from Funnel Weaver and make them into full songs. Iíd say we could end up with at least 5 albums worth of material. Until then, weíll have to settle for this brief teaser of what is (hopefully) to come.

2/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Tripp on February 09, 2011, 09:51:38 PM
I've never been able to fully listen to the entire album in one sitting. I feel as though the album is on it's own level of Buckethead, completely different than anything else he has ever done. Just looking at 49 songs, albeit all of them short, is daunting and I really don't feel like doing listening to any of them.

I guess one day I'll actually have to have a full listen through the albums entirety... Joy.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on February 16, 2011, 06:41:47 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Bermuda Triangle
Genre: Avant-Garde Metal
Year: 2002

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 08: Bermuda Triangle

The intro track of this album warns us that we are about to go into one of the strangest places known to man. While I wouldn’t go that far when it comes to Buckethead’s discography, which is already pretty out there to begin with, I will admit that this is one of the lesser known outings. In fact, the run of this and the last two albums tends to not be popular among some fans (myself included). It’s not really that we don’t like the albums, it’s that they’re wedged between Monsters & Robots and the upcoming Electric Tears. I don’t blame anybody for forgetting about this one, but it does contain some great moments. The album, like the previous Somewhere Over the Slaughterhouse, is largely based on electronica. The riffs are still there, the shredding still shows up when it feels the need, and if you wanted another Somewhere Over the Slaughterhouse, well here it is.

The guitar playing on this album is quite similar to Somewhere Over the Slaughterhouse (You’ll be seeing that album’s name dropped many times, so get used to it). There are a few moments of superbly divine heaviness, and a couple instances of god-like shredding, but a vast majority of this album focuses on atmosphere. Entire songs are based on a single effect and a drum loop. Casual Buckethead fans may not appreciate them, and even hardcore fans might be wondering why they exist. Personally, I don’t have a problem with it, but they can become grating as I typically prefer to listen to Buckethead so that my ears can be graced with pure guitar genius.

The backing band doesn’t make itself known very often at all. Any bass on the album is nearly completely forgettable, and even the more interesting drum beats tend to loop around quite a bit. The saving graces are the vocal samples and the keyboards. They provide some color to the songs and create an interesting listening experience. The only problem is Buckethead had already made an album like this, not one year earlier, and the material is definitely starting to sound a bit tired and worn out.

As far as my song pick for this album, it has to be Sea of Expanding Shapes. The guitar work in it is just great. It’s the main focus of the song, and the shredding towards the end is just killer.

It really almost bothers me that I don’t have much good to say about this album. The albums that follow this one blossom into one of the strongest runs of Buckethead’s entire career, so one could view this album as being a bit of a stumbling block to bring out the necessary goodness. Again, it’s not that this one is particularly bad, it’s just that when Buckethead is on the cusp of something so good, he decided to jump into this electronic stuff for a bit and got a bit of a mixed reaction. However, if this album was necessary to bring out the best of the man, then I award it points for that alone.

3/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on February 16, 2011, 07:03:08 PM
I really like Bermuda Triangle. It might not be a "great" album, but it is definitely solid. I would agree on your choice for the favourite song, but I love Masoleum Door just a bit more.

Great review though, I totally agree with most of what you said.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on February 16, 2011, 07:03:47 PM
Great review though, I totally agree with most of what you said.
This shocks and amazes me.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Tripp on February 16, 2011, 10:58:00 PM
Bermuda Triangle is a good album, but it doesn't get very many listens from me, as nothing special sticks out about it. I'll have to agree with UMH, and go with Sea of Expanding Shapes to be the best song on the album.

Can't wait to hear Electric Tears' review!
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on February 27, 2011, 04:10:09 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Electric Tears
Genre: Avant-Garde
Year: 2002

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 09: Electric Tears

As stated before, the guitar virtuoso genre is filled to the brim with one-trick-ponies who can shred with the best of them, but fall flat when it comes to playing a truly heartfelt song. Fortunately (as Iím sure weíre all aware of by now), Buckethead is one huge exception to this stereotype. On his second ďmellowĒ album, Electric Tears, Buckethead does away with the bass and drums entirely, leaving his beautiful guitar melodies to entertain listeners for over 70 minutes. It takes some serious confidence to even think about producing an album like this, but it requires a whole other level of skill to make it interesting enough to keep peopleís attention. I never had any doubts, of course, but for any who may be questioning the merits of this recording, fear not. This album is undoubtedly one of Bucketheadís greatest accomplishments.

The guitar on this album, as noted, is not the focal point. Nay, itís the only point. There is not a single drum hit nor bass groove on the entirety of this recording. Every melody Buckethead plays carries the listener into another dimension, one where everybody sleeps on clouds, drinks champagne, and chats idly about the universe. I know Iím going a bit crazy with the descriptions, but this album truly takes you somewhere. Colma was an absolute masterpiece of the instrument, but with Electric Tears the guitar is turned into every single role in the song, and Buckethead makes it work splendidly. My favorite aspect of the playing on this album is itís not all acoustic. The electric guitar comes in on the more soul-cutting melodies, the ones that just rip into your heart and twist it around a good bit. Most of the backing rhythms consist of repeating arpeggios, but the songs never stick around long enough for them to become boring.

As far as the best song on this album, any Buckethead fan knows it has to be Padmasana. This is an 11 and a half minute journey into Bucketheadís softer side. The rhythm is extremely repetitive, but the melodies and soloing turn it into one of the most incredible songs I have ever had the pleasure of hearing. The song never gets boring, even though the rhythmic motif never changes.

For introductory purposes, it might be wise to go with Colma instead. Padmasana may be a little bit too much to handle for new listeners, and Colma is overall slightly more accessible (though both albums are as accessible as Buckethead can get). For listeners already accustomed to Bucketheadís playing, you really canít go wrong with this one.

5/5

Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: jsem on February 28, 2011, 12:02:59 AM
I am fond of Baptism of Solitude on that album. Padmasana is still #1 though, easily.

 :tup :tup :tup
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on March 16, 2011, 08:08:16 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Bucketheadland 2
Genre: Avant-Garde Metal
Year: 2003

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 10: Bucketheadland 2

10 years after releasing the massive, eclectic monster known as Bucketheadland, we have arrived at the sequel. A fitting tribute to where Bucketheadís been, and where heís going, this album serves as a crossroads for the manís entire discography. This album was definitely a turning point in his career. The songs have been getting a bit heavier with each album (aside from the masterful soft albums, of course), and this one is no exception. The riffs surge forward with full force, and the random bursts of insane shredding just add color to the madness of Bucketheadís flagship theme park. One of the coolest things about this album is itís not very coherent at all. The hired guns of the park like to interrupt the songs with little anecdotes about the park. This gives the album an inherently choppy nature that may turn off listeners, but anyone who knows what Buckethead is about should be well aware that this is just how he works.

As stated above, the guitar playing on this album is just amazing, as is par for the course with a Buckethead album. The guitars are tuned way down for this album, where they give so much more crush to the sound. The solos pop up with little to no warning, always giving a very pleasant surprise. Bucketheadís shredding identity continues to grow. Strangely enough, it almost feels like the guitar is not the main focus of this album. It does what it needs to in order to drive the songs forward, but thatís about it. The short acoustic bits in Albertís songs and planted in other random areas are cool for a bit of a break.

The backing band is pretty much the same as the last few heavy albums. There was nothing wrong with the sound then, and thereís nothing wrong with it now. The bass gives a good boost to the already bottomed-out guitar sound, and the drums drive the freight-train riffs full steam ahead.

Now, one of the most defining characteristics of the original Bucketheadland was its immense focus on the vocal samples that would take place between the songs. There would be someone talking about the typical Buckethead mythology, and then a shred solo from hell would jump out of nowhere. This time around, Buckethead decided to just have random interjections from various characters in the middle of the songs. Itís all up to personal opinion which approach is better, but I feel it works extremely well with the insane, out of control nature that the album has already. There are a few recurring characters, such as Albert, who gives the most demented ramblings Iíve ever heard committed to tape. Seriously, I wonít do it any justice by describing it, it needs to be listened to.

The song of the album is an easy pick, Frozen Brains Tell No Tales. One of my favorite Buckethead songs, it has an awesome main riff, which turns into one of the greatest riffs anyone has ever written. It meanders around some more before Bootsy Collins screams out ďHEíS GOT A BUCKET ON HIS HEAAAAADĒ letting Buckethead rip into the most heartfelt solo on the album. Excellent tune, indeed.

Overall, this is an album for the people who stuck with Buckethead through his years of experimentation. 2 electronic albums, an album of introductions, and 2 soft albums, it was definitely time to bring the classic insanity that Buckethead had been veering away from. Iíd say itís not the best album for a new fan, but I listened to it fairly early, and now Iím writing reviews for everything the man has produced, so who the hell am I to judge?

5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on March 16, 2011, 08:54:37 PM
Best. Buckethead. Album. Ever. I might have to listen to it again now. It's been a while.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Progmetty on March 18, 2011, 05:42:41 AM
Never heard his music but it certainly sounds interesting, pick an album for me to try please!
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on March 18, 2011, 05:51:35 AM
Monsters & Robots
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on April 03, 2011, 06:42:16 PM
Artist: Buckethead
Album: Island of Lost Minds
Genre: Avant-Garde Metal
Year: 2004

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 11: Island of Lost Minds

After our last adventure to the terrifying amusement park of Bucketheadland, we are treated once again to a batch of insane music from our good friend, Buckethead. This album is definitely one of his more twisted musical excursions. The guitar melodies plod around with dissonance over extremely heavy riffs, leaving an overall chaotic feeling that permeates most of the album. One thingís for sure, this album is not a boring experience. Thereís not much in the way of variety, but the sheer jarring nature of this album can make it one of Bucketheadís more interesting experiments.

As stated above, the guitar work on this album can be best summed up in two sections. First, weíve got the rhythm guitar work crunching away with riffs that sound like they could have fit right in on Bucketheadland 2. The guitars are again tuned very low for extra darkness. Second, weíve got the lead work, mainly consisting of little ditties that wouldnít be out of place as an opening theme to a 90s TV show. Most of them sound like 2 guitars are playing them, but occasionally one of the guitars will miss a note, hit something else, or maybe just not bend the note as long, leading to a very unsettling melody. Obviously, this aspect of the album was intentional. Weíve already proven that Bucketheadís chops are nothing to be scoffed at, so I can appreciate the ďmistakesĒ as artistic integrity. They can be very off-putting at first, but those who stick with it will ultimately be rewarded with the guitar work on this album. Buckethead still takes the time to blow our minds with a complicated lick or solo, such as the bridge of Mud of the Gutter.

The backing band is going for a more minimalist approach on this album. The drums pound away with a nearly danceable beat, while the bass will typically mimic the rhythm guitars very closely. The bass does have a few moments where it will jump forward and take some lead, but gone are the slapping interludes from Bootsy Collins. Full focus is brought onto the guitar work. Whether this is a good decision or a bad decision is entirely subjective. Of course, as a fellow axe-grinder I tend to enjoy the ďguitars up frontĒ attitude that this album and most of Bucketheadís other albums tend to display.

Sampling is almost nowhere to be found. To make up for this, Buckethead went absolutely insane with his guitar effects. Pick scraping, pinch harmonics, tremolo picking, you name it, thereís a good chance it was toyed with on this album. As such, this album can prove to be a worthwhile listen just to listen to all the goofy things that Buckethead is capable of.

The best song on the album is kind of a tough choice. Honestly, Iíd say Dream Darts is the most interesting song here. It follows the same pattern as the other songs, but itís probably the most memorable of the album. Most of the songs are pretty consistent as far as quality is concerned.

Unfortunately, the album is not without flaws. While it is overall an enjoyable album, the songs can tend to run together pretty badly. The pattern of ďheavy riff-weird melody-heavy riff-weird melody-fade outĒ can become fairly monotonous rather quickly if youíre not focused. The twisted nursery rhyme style of some of the melodies can be kind of annoying if youíre up for a more serious listen. Itís definitely not an album Iíd recommend to a beginning Buckethead fan, but the diehards owe it to themselves to give this album a try.

4/5



Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ben_Jamin on April 04, 2011, 12:45:11 PM
Nice review. Got to give props to Korova Binge Bar, Laser Lobotomy.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Lowdz on April 23, 2011, 02:28:07 PM
Just wanted to thank you Ultimetalhead for the help in introducing me to this wonderful musician. Before you started this mammoth task I'd never heard a note as was put off by the bucket to be honest. I've picked up a few of these albums but I've just heard the rather beautiful Padmasana and I'm in love. I can't think of any other words for it but beautiful. Listening again.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on April 23, 2011, 02:48:08 PM
Glad to hear it.  :tup One of these days I'll be so bored that I can't think of anything else to do and I'll start this up again.

Like, right now actually.

Artist: Buckethead
Album: Population Override
Genre: Jazz
Year: 2004


Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 012: Population Override

For an artist like Buckethead, no ground he covers should be ďsurprisingĒ. Weíve had several albums full of instrumental metal, a few melodic albums, some avant-garde experimentation, and even some techno. What else could Buckethead possibly do to secure his title as the ultimate guitar player? The obvious answer is jazz rock. This album is 10 songs with some of Bucketheadís most creative soloing ever. Thereís not much in the way of shred on this album, more melodic, soul-filled playing. The variety on this chapter of Bucketheadís discography is truly one of the strongest aspects. Starting out with a rocking jazz song in Unrestrained Growth, the next song is the melancholic, emotionally charged Too Many Humans. The balance is nothing short of perfect.

Itís honestly quite difficult to describe this album in words. Itís what Iíd consider the bridge between Bucketheadís heavier material and his soft stuff. Itís not Electric Tears, but itís definitely not Bucketheadland 2 either. The guitar playing is clearly 100% improvised, in true blues nature. The truly amazing thing about this album is Buckethead manages to play a solo for the vast majority of it, and it never even once feels like heís played any section twice. The solo changes with the music, which keeps it interesting and an absolute joy to listen to. Blues guitar playing sometimes gets a bad rap because it can become far too self-indulgent for anyone who doesnít have a pre-existing appreciation for it. Fortunately, with Bucketheadís immense creativity and penchant for effects such as the killswitch, we are treated to the most unique blues soloing ever recorded.

The backing band, like in most blues based excursions, is tasked with keeping the song from falling apart while the guitar player goes nuts. No problems there. However, one of the key additions to this album is the keyboard played by Travis Dickerson, who is in charge of the label that releases most of Bucketheadís music. The keyboard maintains the atmosphere in the slower songs, and jumps in for a quick solo right when it seems like the guitar sound might start grating on the listenerís nerves. Itís one of the twists that keeps the album interesting throughout its 55 minute run-time.

The best song on this album is ridiculously difficult to choose, because while there is a marked change in style between each song, most of them follow the same formula. Like in most blues, there is a backing track which the soloist(s) plays over. That said, each song is still easily differentiated between. They donít run together at all. Iíll have to give the honor to Unrestrained Growth though. It was the first song I heard from Buckethead that truly gave me an appreciation for how seasoned of a player he is. Before, I figured he was just like every other shredder on the planet who can play fast and nothing else. I couldnít have been more wrong.

For beginners to Bucketheadís music, this is definitely a good starting point. Iíve gotten numerous people who absolutely despise metal into this album, and they eventually warm up to the metal side. Though, if someoneís expecting some jaw-dropping shredding, they may want to look elsewhere. Overall, this album is one of the highest points in Bucketheadís extensive discography, and it deserves to be heard by anybody who is a fan of the instrument.

5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: jsem on April 24, 2011, 02:04:23 AM
One of my top 5 BH albums, an epic one indeed.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ben_Jamin on April 24, 2011, 10:31:39 AM
The one album I bought and found at a local Hastings. I was expecting some, weird crazyness and I got a chill easy listening album.

This gets me in a calm mood and is real relaxing, with a bit of energy to it.

My favorite has to be Earth Heals Herself.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on April 24, 2011, 12:05:47 PM
Completely disregarded this thread, my bad. Island of Lost Minds is a very cool album, but it doesn't get many listens from me because it kind of seems like standard Buckethead insanity, if there ever was such a thing.

As for Population Override, it might just be one of the best chill albums ever. It's basically a collection of long jam sessions. And the opening track is easily my favourite. Groovy.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 05, 2011, 10:56:56 PM
One of the best threads I have read here. Agree with just about everything you have said about every album. Buckethead is just awesome, case closed.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on June 06, 2011, 02:21:36 PM
Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 013: The Cuckoo Clocks of Hell

After the brilliant jazz-fusion odyssey, Population Override, Buckethead clearly wanted to prove that he can still shred with the best of them. His mission brought out one of his most insane albums yet, even more than Island of Lost Minds. Making anything more insane than that is an exercise in pure mayhem, but Buckethead of course makes it seem effortless. Buckle up, strap your balls down, and hold on. We're in for quite a ride with this one.

The guitar work on this album is incredibly frantic, especially on the first two tracks. Due to the overall maddening pace of the album, the songs are quite short, rarely lasting more than 3 and a half minutes. When the guitars aren't pummeling away with the drums, melodies are sometimes played that harken back to the aforementioned Islands of Lost Minds. That twisted sense of melody is what we've come to expect from Buckethead at this point in our journey. Every lick, riff, or solo on this album is executed with surgical precision, and every little bit of insanity seems like it was intended that way. One must wonder if Buckethead simply improvises, or if he sits with nerd glasses over his mask meticulously planning each psychotic episode. That said, the album isn't all 100% insanity. There's a beautiful solo in The Treeman before the drums take off again, but it's not really long enough to make much of an impact.

The backup instruments serve their purpose to keep the madness moving forward quite well. The blast beats compliment Buckethead's frantic riffing very well, and the bass is condemned to mirror the guitar. I wish there was more to talk about with the drums and bass, but the main focus is obviously the guitar work.

In my mind, the best song on the album is The Treeman. As I mentioned, it has an absurdly gorgeous, albeit quick, solo. I feel it also contains the most variety out of all the songs. It's the most interesting song on an album full of speed metal.

Sadly, I have a few problems with this album. The sheer intensity of this album can become annoying after a while. There's often just not enough time to catch one's breath before the next slice of crazy pops up. Because the album has a bit of a stop-start nature, the songs can run together very easily if you're not paying attention. I definitely wouldn't recommend this album to beginners, simply because it only really focuses on one aspect of Buckethead's playing.

3.5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 06, 2011, 02:57:09 PM
Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 013: The Cuckoo Clocks of Hell

After the brilliant jazz-fusion odyssey, Population Override, Buckethead clearly wanted to prove that he can still shred with the best of them. His mission brought out one of his most insane albums yet, even more than Island of Lost Minds. Making anything more insane than that is an exercise in pure mayhem, but Buckethead of course makes it seem effortless. Buckle up, strap your balls down, and hold on. We're in for quite a ride with this one.

The guitar work on this album is incredibly frantic, especially on the first two tracks. Due to the overall maddening pace of the album, the songs are quite short, rarely lasting more than 3 and a half minutes. When the guitars aren't pummeling away with the drums, melodies are sometimes played that harken back to the aforementioned Islands of Lost Minds. That twisted sense of melody is what we've come to expect from Buckethead at this point in our journey. Every lick, riff, or solo on this album is executed with surgical precision, and every little bit of insanity seems like it was intended that way. One must wonder if Buckethead simply improvises, or if he sits with nerd glasses over his mask meticulously planning each psychotic episode. That said, the album isn't all 100% insanity. There's a beautiful solo in The Treeman before the drums take off again, but it's not really long enough to make much of an impact.

The backup instruments serve their purpose to keep the madness moving forward quite well. The blast beats compliment Buckethead's frantic riffing very well, and the bass is condemned to mirror the guitar. I wish there was more to talk about with the drums and bass, but the main focus is obviously the guitar work.

In my mind, the best song on the album is The Treeman. As I mentioned, it has an absurdly gorgeous, albeit quick, solo. I feel it also contains the most variety out of all the songs. It's the most interesting song on an album full of speed metal.

Sadly, I have a few problems with this album. The sheer intensity of this album can become annoying after a while. There's often just not enough time to catch one's breath before the next slice of crazy pops up. Because the album has a bit of a stop-start nature, the songs can run together very easily if you're not paying attention. I definitely wouldn't recommend this album to beginners, simply because it only really focuses on one aspect of Buckethead's playing.

3.5/5

I totally agree 100% with you on this one. Some of the riffs in this album are just in your face the whole time and are just awesome in a godly level.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on June 06, 2011, 03:44:57 PM
Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 014: Enter the Chicken

So, after our journey into the more psychotic side of Buckethead's music, Enter the Chicken offers something no other Buckethead album has: Songs, with actual vocals. Indeed, this may be Buckethead's most cohesive work to date, the vocals really do help make the album more interesting. Back in the early days, the samples did enough to keep the music entertaining, but as Buckethead gradually fell out of love with sampling, the quality of the music suffered ever so slightly. With this album, we are given a taste of what would happen if Buckethead suddenly turned into Arjen Lucassen and put together a cast of singers to add another dynamic to his music. It is, for the most part, a huge success.

The guitar is very nearly pushed away in favor of the vocal guests this time around. However, there are still many spots for Buckethead to stretch out his fingers and melt the mind with ferocious soloing. In fact, the lack of solos on this album make the guitar feature song, Nottingham Lace, the best song on the album by far. Buckethead still riffs with the best of them, and the vocalists seem to breathe new life into them. This may come as a bit of a disappointment to some Buckethead fans since he's arguably not the main attraction here, but I feel it was a good experiment that needed to happen.

For the first and last time in this epically long review series, I'm dedicating a paragraph to vocals. This isn't exactly what one would consider a cast of all-star vocalists. Aside from the well-known Serj Tankian, most of the vocalists here are new faces that have worked with Buckethead in the past on various projects. For the most part, the cast is very good. While I don't like the hardcore vocals of Efrem Schulz, they actually work here because they're not over your typical boring metalcore riff. Buckethead can really make anything sound good. For all the Deli Creeps fans out there (all 4 of us), Maximum Bob makes a suitably hilarious appearance.

The backing instrumentalists are shoved even further back with the vocal additions, but it's nothing to complain about really. They do their job of sitting back and letting the true masters of the craft make their stamp on the music. No bass or drum solos here, just good ol' fashioned guitar and vocals.

As I said earlier, the best song on this album is Nottingham Lace. One of the few instrumentals on the album, the song is a stomping ground for Buckethead to lay it all down and show everyone that he hasn't lost his touch (it seems like there's at least one song like this on every experimental album, even Population Override had a shred piece). It's an absolute joy to listen to, and I recommend it highly even if the thought of Buckethead with vocals makes you want to puke out of every orifice of your body. Seriously, it's a gem.

All this praise, and there's really not very many negative things I can say about this one. I already touched on how the purists may not appreciate the vocal approach taking away from their precious Buckethead riffs, but they're not bombastic enough to detract too much anyway. Even the metalcore vocals sound good, so you've got an A+ album in my opinion. It's probably one of the best beginning albums one can experience as well. It's a no-brainer that an album with vocals is far more accessible than one without. Overall, this is not a Buckethead album to be missed. It's one of a kind in his extensive discography, and everyone should hear it at least once.

4.5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: lateralus88 on June 06, 2011, 04:48:09 PM
@ Cuckoo Clocks - I basically agree with all of it. Surprise, surprise.

@ Enter the Chicken - I am kind of weird about this album, personally. There are only like...3 tracks I ever feel like going out of my way to listen to. Other than that, I hardly listen to it.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 06, 2011, 07:42:28 PM
I think you should add me to that number 4 of Deli Creep fans out there because I like them as well. Also Enter the Chicken has some really good songs as well and the vocals go really well as also which means I agree with your review hah.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on June 06, 2011, 10:25:01 PM
3 reviews in one day? I must have found my work ethic overnight.

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 015: Kaleidoscalp

Fans who embraced the chaos and general musical insanity of The Cuckoo Clocks of Hell and Island of Lost Minds can collectively rejoice. This album is yet another foray into the twisted world of Buckethead. However, this album presents an entirely different array of craziness. On Kaleidoscalp, his 15th studio album, Buckethead decided to add a new twist to his music: circuit bending. Some of the sounds on this album are downright frightening, but they fit so amazingly well with the riffs that the man creates that one may wonder why such experiments weren't made earlier.

The guitar playing on this wedge is very similar to the style of Island of Lost Minds. The wacked-out melodies still take the forefront when the heavy riffing isn't already in the way. The big change here is with the guitar effects. Everything just feels fresher with some psychotic mechanical sound effects. My biggest problem with this album is how to discuss the effects. They sound very much like keyboard, but a part of me feels like the guitar is being patched through the circuit bender. Either way, it sounds great, and since it's the lead instrument when it pops up, I'll just discuss it wherever the hell I want.

The backing band is fairly limited to the role it took up with Cuckoo Clocks, which isn't necessarily a bad thing. Keeping some sense of order on an album that is so chaotic is important. It helps the lead instrument (guitar, keyboard, whatever it is) stand out even more. Nothing new to talk about there.

My favorite song on the album is difficult to choose. The stronger tracks are all incredibly good. If I was forced to pick one, I'd most likely go with The Bronze Bat. It stuck out more to me on this listen than any other, specifically the circuit bending solo towards the end. It compliments the riff quite nicely.

There's not much to complain about with this album. The songs can run together if you're not paying attention, but that's a common plague with all instrumental albums. Some listeners could be frightened or made uncomfortable by the spontaneity of the mechanical sounds, and I know a few people who just plain don't like the futuristic noises that are so prominent here.

Overall, I'm not sure if I'd recommend this to a Buckethead beginner, since it's pretty wild. One may need a slightly more accessible entry before jumping into this wacky stuff. This was definitely an example of Buckethead's more successful experiments, and it would be revisited frequently for many albums to come. Buckethead was clearly looking for ways to keep his music fresh and exciting, and well, let's just say he really struck gold with the next one.

4/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 06, 2011, 10:34:11 PM
You have just turned into one of my favorite reviewers of all time.  :hefdaddy
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on June 06, 2011, 10:37:29 PM
Glad to hear it, I've still got about 35 more to go. :p

By the way, you can probably expect the Inbred Mountain review tonight as well, because I'll be honest and say I fucking LOVE Inbred Mountain.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 06, 2011, 10:41:11 PM
Well I am very much looking towards reading those other 35 reviews.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on June 06, 2011, 11:03:27 PM
Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 016: Inbred Mountain

I'm going to be straight with everyone here and say that I absolutely adore this album. It's easily in my top 5 Buckethead albums. Expect plenty of blatant worship, and very very little complaining. It'd probably be easier to just say, "Get this album right now. 5/5" and be done, but that wouldn't be fair, and to be honest, I've been looking forward to this one. The best Buckethead albums, in my opinion, are the ones that take the listener on a journey. Both of the Bucketheadland albums accomplish this goal nicely, but it's the ones that have no vocals or samples at all that really impress me. The entire story is told through the song titles, and it makes the music paint such a vivid picture. So far, the only album we've heard that accomplished this was Population Override, which is another one of my all-time favorites. The album title alone draws visions of a young scientist, perhaps a modern day Charles Darwin, searching for a legendary mountain where many unheard of species of beast reside, and very narrowly escaping with his life.

Unbelievable. The guitar work on this album absolutely decimates every other Buckethead recording we've heard so far. Within the first four minutes of the album, we're treated to what I call "organized chaos". Albums like Cuckoo Clocks and Island of Lost Minds suffered from a lack of direction. Inbred Mountain has a firm agenda, and it makes the album into a true masterpiece. Nearly every aspect of Buckethead's playing is touched upon here. The shredding is his best yet, the riffs are insane, but not so crazy as to not make sense, and the stylistic shifts are flawlessly executed (Seriously, there's a seamless transition into a banjo solo at the end of Advance to the Summit, a BANJO SOLO). There's a word for this kind of musicianship: genius.

The backing band isn't as decorated as the guitar playing, but that's a small price to pay for a flawless piece of music. The keyboard effects are the most prominenet background music, and they compliment the guitar perfectly. This was no doubt a result of the lessons learned from Kaleidoscalp. The drums do sound more authentic in spots, but they still seem like they were programmed. Still, the quality of this album is so high that no small issue can detract from its aura of pure godliness.

Picking a favorite song on this album is like picking a favorite child. You know you like one just a little bit more than the others, but it honestly hurts to acknowledge it. Regardless, that song is the opener, In Search of Inbred Mountain.While the other songs all have great variety, this song packs it all into one without feeling too choppy. Great musicians have struggled their entire lives to compose something this good, and Buckethead makes it seem like he crapped this whole album out in a weekend.

I'm trying so hard to come up with something to complain about, but it's just not coming to me. I guess, if you're not in the mood for awesome music, you won't like this too much. Buckethead noobs and the diehards both need this album desperately. It is without a doubt one of the greatest Buckethead albums, and possibly one of the best of all time.

5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 06, 2011, 11:16:35 PM
I don't think I have really ever paid or heard that much from this album but I will certaintely listen to it now especially after seeing how much you worship it. Also Buckethead could write albums like this on a daily basis if he wanted to. I'm just letting you guys know.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on June 08, 2011, 09:53:22 PM
Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 017: The Elephant Man's Alarm Clock

After the brilliant Inbred Mountain comes a more song-oriented album with similar tendencies. While our last journey was a cohesive piece, and one of the only Buckethead albums that doesn't feel like a collection of songs, this album manages to be just as interesting while being more accessible. The album contains a suite of four short songs very highly regarded in Buckethead's fanbase, Lurker at the Threshold. Lurker would end up seeming like an Inbred Mountain b-side if it was spliced into one track. One of Buckethead's most popular songs, Final Wars, is also here. So, let's dig in.

Guitar playing on this album is quite varied, much like Inbred Mountain. As such, I tend to enjoy it a hell of a lot. Songs like Final Wars are absolutely shredtastic with little bits of beauty spread about, while songs like the rip-roaring opener Thai Fighter Swarm are immensely heavy with lots of musical twists. Buckethead's shredding on Baseball Furies is especially impressive. The most interesting guitar song here is most likely the title track. It retains the intensity of Cuckoo Clocks while giving room to air out (like most of the Cuckoo Clocks songs should have). Overall, fnas of Buckethead's previous heavy work will be extremely satisfied.

The backing band has a bit more prominence this time around, even going so far as to have a quick bass/drum jam culminating in a bass solo during the title track. Other than these moments, the drums keep everything together nicely, while the bass typically mirrors the rhythm lines. The little moments where the background parts jump forward are what makes the album though. Bits and pieces of the Lurker suite really shine in that regard.

My favorite song here is Final Wars, no doubt, but special mention must be made for the rest of the album. This album marked the start of a trend where each Buckethead album would be rather short. These decisions led to a noticeably stronger album, where weak moments were just not found. If the Lurker suite was one piece, this album would have ten songs, which is indeed quite short for a Buckethead album. It's also worth noting that if the Lurker suite was considered one song, it would easily be the best on the album. I consider it as separate tracks though, because that's how they're listed. It seems absurd not to make it all one track, but I respect the big man's decisions.

Not much negative to say about this one. Even the fans who only like Colma, Electric Tears, and Population Override will find plenty to love here. This album is a great picture of what Buckethead's modern material would bring, and is a very good choice for a beginning fan. It remains one of my favorites to date.

5/5

Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on June 08, 2011, 10:21:11 PM

Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 018: Crime Slunk Scene

Our chicken-loving friend has released 2 flawless albums right in a row within a year's time. Can he get another piece of perfection out in such a short time?

Well, not quite, but it comes pretty damned close.

This album seems like a more melodic Elephant Man, at least for the first half. The second half amps up the heaviness a little bit, but this album feels mostly like a natural progression to more accessible material.

The guitar playing on this album is just as impressive as one would expect from a mask-wearing guitar player who's released 17 albums within 15 years, that is to say, pretty impressive. There's enough shred to satisfy people like me, and the riffs aren't continuously pummeling. The rest of the solos can be extremely melodic at times. There is, of course, one solo on this album which clearly stands out as one of the best of Buckethead's extensive career, but I'll get to that later.

The background instruments are ever so slightly more limited in their roles here than in Elephant Man. There's not very many moments where they are given the spotlight. It's pretty much 100% guitar all the time. With a talent like Buckethead, this is obviously not a bad thing.

So, the best song on the album should be pretty much universally agreed upon. This song is the 9 minute epic, Soothsayer. Dedicated to whom I assume is Buckethead's passed Aunt, Soothsayer is easily one of the most beautiful pieces of music I've ever had the pleasure of experiencing. From the soothing, ambient verses to the heavy chorus, and then to the 5 minutes of emotional shredding, this song delivers on every conceivable level. Within Buckethead's rewarding discography, if one song stood out as the true gem, Soothsayer would be it.

That said, this album feels very much like a slightly watered down Elephant Man. While the album it emulates was flawless, I tend to have issues with attempting to recapture the same vibe twice, within the same year no less. The album is still great, but listening to it right after Elephant Man can be draining.

Overall, this album is definitely one of the higher tiered albums, as long as one hasn't heard Elephant Man first. Even so, Soothsayer is a must-hear.

4.5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 11, 2011, 08:30:17 AM
Final Wars and Soothsayer are one the greatest songs ever made in my opinion. I have never been able to get tired of Sotthsayer no matter how many times I listen to it.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Lowdz on June 12, 2011, 12:49:02 PM
Ulti, you're costing me a fortune here! Just got Elephant Man and Inbred on you're glowing praise. Already acquired CSS earlier and yes, Soothsayer is everything you said. This was the track that convinced me this guy was the real thing and not (just) some weirdo with an acute case of shyness.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 12, 2011, 10:47:33 PM
Ulti, you're costing me a fortune here! Just got Elephant Man and Inbred on you're glowing praise. Already acquired CSS earlier and yes, Soothsayer is everything you said. This was the track that convinced me this guy was the real thing and not (just) some weirdo with an acute case of shyness.
Hell yeah man. Soothsayer is just awesome in so many ways, I just can't beleive it.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Lowdz on June 13, 2011, 02:22:27 PM
First chance I've had to listen to my new acquisitions so first up is Elephant Man. My my, Final Wars is just incredible. Baseball Furries is very good too. This is going well.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: jsem on June 14, 2011, 08:31:38 AM
Gotta shout out some more love for Inbred Mountain.

Lotus Island is one the best instrumental rock tracks ever.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on June 20, 2011, 07:17:23 PM
I've just been listening to Spinal Clock and I have to say that that album is really something. Hopefully you'll get far enough to review that album so I can read what you have to say about it.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on June 20, 2011, 09:55:59 PM
I was originally going to review all of In Search of The, but I have absolutely nothing to say about it.  :lol Pepper's Ghost is up next.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on July 09, 2011, 12:58:38 AM
Did you give up???
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on July 09, 2011, 09:13:25 AM
Did you give up???
I'm offended that you would think such a thing. Of course not. Just taking a bit of a break. Reviews will start popping up soon, I'm sure.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Tripp on July 09, 2011, 06:51:41 PM
They better, or I will send killer tires to blow up your head.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on July 09, 2011, 08:05:39 PM
Did you give up???
I'm offended that you would think such a thing. Of course not. Just taking a bit of a break. Reviews will start popping up soon, I'm sure.
Good. I was starting to get bored.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on July 27, 2011, 06:27:06 PM
Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 019: Pepper's Ghost

After experimenting with an album (or at least a half-album) of semi-accessible songs with Crime Slunk Scene, and creating his most inaccessible project (the 13 disc box set, In Search of The), Buckethead finally fell into a bit of a niche with 2007's Pepper's Ghost. This album gave birth to what I refer to as modern Buckethead. There are three distinct periods of Bucket, in my opinion. From Bucketheadland to Funnel Weaver is old Bucket, middle Bucket is from Bucketheadland 2 until this one. While it may not seem very different, this album started a trend in Buckethead's music that has yet to be stopped (barring a few exceptions). The music is less focused on outright insanity, and more on creating catchy, accessible instrumental rock/metal. While this outing may get a bit samey, this is a formula that would be perfected in due time.

The guitar playing on this album is just as varied as Buckethead's previous efforts. It's not as out there as Inbred Mountain, though. There's plenty of soft sections sprinkled between the classic Buckethead riffing. Speaking of the riffs, this album feels like a lighter version of Cuckoo Clocks in some places, and like a distortion filled Electric Tears in others. This is a great example of all that Buckethead has to offer. If there's not a gorgeous melody over a riff, there's a good chance the riff itself is the melody. Almost any instrumental shred guitarist uses riffs as a backdrop for the shredding. What Buckethead has done here is combined the two. Indeed, many of the riffs on this album are more complicated than any lay-guitariasts most complex solo.

The backing band won't be having much of a presence for the next several albums, so I'll be eschewing this paragraph until further notice. Both the bass and drums compliment the guitar perfectly. Of course, with guitar wizardry from Buckethead, the last thing anybody would care about is the drumming.
My favorite song on the album is Brewer in the Air. It's a great riff fest populated with what most fans call "chicken picking", a staccato feel with very intricate playing. No guitarist has mastered this technique as flawlessly as Buckethead.

This is definitely one of the best starter albums any aspiring Buckethead fan can pick. It's a great introduction to Buckethead's modern material, while still being interesting enough for the fans who have been with the masked marvel since the beginning. The only problem I can find with it is it loses a bit of steam towards the end. Thankfully, this problem would be eliminated on future albums.

4/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Obfuscation on July 27, 2011, 10:26:58 PM
Well now, finally we got something. I agree that it does tend to sound reprtetive towards the end and that's why I mostly only listen to lets say the first half of the album, but it's still one of my favorite albums from him no doubt.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on September 19, 2011, 08:37:14 PM
Buckethead in a Year: The Reviews Project
Part 020: Decoding the Tomb of Bansheebot

After a 13-disc box set and another great album in the same year, one would have to assume that this bucket-toting guitar wizard might take a break for a few years. Of course, like clockwork, Buckethead released yet another album in 2007, and it most definitely holds up to its predecessors. I really can't fathom how Buckethead manages to keep his music interesting with how many new albums he puts out in a year. If there's one thing I've learned to appreciate on my journey so far, it's Buckethead's passion for music. It just conjures an image in my mind of a fiercely creative individual who just can't stop making awesome music. Anyway, enough sentimental ranting, back to the album. This one channels a similar vibe to Pepper's Ghost, but it's a bit faster (not as intense as Cuckoo Clocks though, more Elepahant Man than anything). Still, there's plenty of chilled out moments to accent the shreddy moments even more.

The guitar work on this album should be pretty easy to guess without even hearing the album (If you've been following these reviews, anyway). At any given moment, in can be frantic riffing and shredding, beautiful melodies over a catchy riff, or even a chilling clean tone setting up the stage for a guitar solo master-class. Buckethead's fascination with the octave jump becomes more present (This becomes a rather large component of the next few albums). If you don't know what an octave jump is, listen to Led Zeppelin's "Immigrant Song". The main riff is exactly what I'm talking about. Another great aspect of this album is how seamlessly it shifts gears. The transitions don't seem choppy at all, and every second of music feels like it belongs (not an ounce of filler to be found). Any guitarist (or aspiring guitarist) is going to find plenty to love here.

The backing band is becoming much less of a focus as we delve deeper into Buckethead's career, and that's alright with me. I don't know a lot of people who listen to Buckethead for the drums (though there are some great double bass moments that really add to the chaos). The drum and bass work was much more prominent on the early albums, and it gives them a unique flair that the newer releases don't have. That's not to say the rest of the band isn't bad here. They're doing their job of keeping the beat and making sure the songs don't fall apart.

There's not a lot in the way of extra effects here. There's some nice electronic stuff (similar to Kaleidoscalp) every now and then, and it's a great change of pace when they pop up. This album is pretty stripped down, focused on the guitar and not much else. But really, why else would you be listening?

The album is very consistent, so picking a favorite track is a bit difficult. In the end, I have to go with Ghost Host. It conveys an eerie mood like a lot of Buckethead songs, but there's just something about this one that I really enjoy. I can't put my finger on it.

Beginners and old-timers alike will feel right at home with this album. It's Buckethead doing what he does best. It won't change your opinion if instrumental metal isn't your thing. This is just another great album to reward the faithful fans who would buy a nugget of poop if it had the man's name on it.

4.5/5
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Lowdz on December 02, 2013, 12:18:10 PM
Come on Ultimetalhead. 30 albums released this year by the man and your behind!!!!!
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on December 02, 2013, 12:47:40 PM
Yeah, this is pretty much fucked.  :lol I might end up reviewing the albums up to the Pikes series, but there's just no fucking way I can sit through all of those.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Lowdz on December 02, 2013, 01:21:40 PM
Yeah, this is pretty much fucked.  :lol I might end up reviewing the albums up to the Pikes series, but there's just no fucking way I can sit through all of those.

That is a pretty impressive body of work over a short period. I've Youtube-d a few and they all seem pretty fantastic. The rocking tracks seem focussed and still melodic and the calmer stuff is beautiful. How the hell do you keep up with that though?
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on December 02, 2013, 01:31:14 PM
Unfortunately, there's not a lot of variation among the albums. There's just no way for anyone to write upwards of 30 albums in a year and have them be even remotely consistent.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Pragmaticcircus on December 02, 2015, 07:42:45 PM
Mr Carlin, these reviews are very nice. Bucket fan here!  :metal
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Parama on December 02, 2015, 09:22:05 PM
it's incredibly amusing to me that buckethead has released over 200 albums since this thread was started  :lol
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on December 07, 2015, 04:42:07 PM
Oh yeah, this was a thing. Every now and then, I get on a Buckethead kick and think I should finish this out, at least up until the utter fucking shitshow of Pikes madness.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Kotowboy on January 03, 2016, 11:34:45 AM
He's released 50 more albums in the time it took me to post this ! :P
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Pragmaticcircus on January 07, 2016, 06:26:25 PM
He released a nice one yesterday! First half; beauty second half; heavy and proggy as fuck  :hefdaddy
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Pound4aBrown on January 26, 2016, 01:02:39 PM
^^
Yeah Mirror Realms is great.
A lot of the post  Halloween run abortion Pikes are great.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Kotowboy on January 26, 2016, 03:53:57 PM
He's released 50 more albums in the time it took me to post this ! :P
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Ultimetalhead on January 27, 2016, 02:02:18 PM
I'm choosing to believe the reason for the onslaught of Pikes albums is because Buckethead found this thread and got scared because I was catching up.
Title: Re: [Music] Buckethead - All Albums
Post by: Kotowboy on February 05, 2016, 05:20:51 PM
Releasing an album a week / day can't be good for quality control.