Author Topic: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?  (Read 1004 times)

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Offline wolfking

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Re: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?
« Reply #35 on: September 12, 2017, 05:22:39 AM »
And then? I mean, now you have a bunch of $20 bills, which isn't something they can expect to get.

Yeah, my thoughts exactly.  You can't get spare change out of an ATM.  I'd be more worried about them mugging me after getting cash out. 

I can't believe people actually ask that.

Offline Stadler

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Re: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?
« Reply #36 on: September 12, 2017, 07:11:49 AM »
And then? I mean, now you have a bunch of $20 bills, which isn't something they can expect to get.

Yeah, my thoughts exactly.  You can't get spare change out of an ATM.  I'd be more worried about them mugging me after getting cash out. 

I can't believe people actually ask that.

They expect the $20, don't kid yourself.  It's them playing on human nature. 

Offline dparrott

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Re: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?
« Reply #37 on: September 12, 2017, 09:01:05 PM »
I was staying in a hotel by the LA Airport and went to the local Dennys to pick up dinner.  As I was walking out a big white scruffy looking man asked me for money.  All I had was a $5 so I just kinda shook my head and kept walking.  This dude CHEWED ME OUT!  Like a 5 min rant saying shit like "Did I do something to you?  I'm a war veteran.  I don't deserve this treatment..." blah blah blah.  I didn't retaliate, I just let him vent.  I was like "OK, sorry, here's my last $5" 

It's a good thing for him I'm nice, if he did that to the wrong person, he would get his ass beat or worse.

But usually if I have something extra I'll kick them down some change or a buck.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2017, 09:07:45 PM by dparrott »
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Offline MetalJunkie

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Re: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?
« Reply #38 on: September 14, 2017, 12:05:27 AM »
I usually just put it in their G-string so they can get back to the stage.
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Offline black_biff_stadler

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Re: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?
« Reply #39 on: September 14, 2017, 01:41:09 AM »
I think I could live with only 5% of the money I give to panhandlers going to actually needy people because the alternative is those 5% of people going hungry and having to endure a miserable and possibly frightening night that could've easily been avoided. I'll now wait for people to explain how those people could've avoided being in those situations by working harder because everybody can make it and there's no such thing as a disadvantage.
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Offline dparrott

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Re: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?
« Reply #40 on: September 17, 2017, 02:37:00 PM »
I've been living and/or working in Ventura County CA for almost 30 years.  I am seeing more people asking for money now than ever before.  And this is a wealthy area! Sign o' the times I guess. 
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Offline Herrick

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Re: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?
« Reply #41 on: September 26, 2017, 06:47:17 PM »
If someone nicely asks me for change and they look like a homeless person then I'll just give them a dollar. There's a very nice guy who holds the door open at my local 7-11. He never asks for money. He'll always say, "Have a good day, Sir!" whether I give him money or not. If I give him money, then he throws in a "God bless you!".

I don't live in a big city so I'm not familiar with all the scams. Most times I don't have cash on me. I've never heard of a homeless person asking someone to follow them to a fucking ATM.



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Offline Stadler

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Re: How do you handle strangers asking you for money?
« Reply #42 on: September 27, 2017, 07:24:24 AM »
I think I could live with only 5% of the money I give to panhandlers going to actually needy people because the alternative is those 5% of people going hungry and having to endure a miserable and possibly frightening night that could've easily been avoided. I'll now wait for people to explain how those people could've avoided being in those situations by working harder because everybody can make it and there's no such thing as a disadvantage.

But saying it that way presupposes the answer.    In my experience, there are two types of homeless:  the kind that, for lack of a better way of saying it, aren't wired in a "society" sort of way, and those that fit pretty damn well into your mildly sarcastic last sentence.   

I can even point you to a specific example:   on the exit off I-95 in Philly for Columbus Avenue.   Heading north, come down off the exit ramp and you will see the latter.   I've personally watched the guy ride up on a $600 bike (whether he paid for that or not is not the point) in a $200 stitched Flyers jersey and join his partner (a woman) in their panhandling.  On more than one occasion I've seen her with glossy red fingernails.   That, to me, is a matter of choices.  I find it straining credibility that someone just "gave" them a $600 bike, or a $200 jersey, or graciously took her out to get her nails done as a token for the homeless.   If you can figure out a way to have those things, you can figure out a way to add to a productive society. 

Contrast with two other examples:   if you take a right at the end of that ramp, you come to a Wawa.  The right turn AFTER the Wawa is a side street that leads to the on ramp of said highway, moving south.  There's a guy there in a wheel chair, missing legs from about the knee down.  On occasion he will be selling flowers, but not usually.   He is almost always in some state of intoxication, or getting there.  I have seen this twice:  some one is handing him money, and he has whipped out his penis and just begun urinating.   If you go straight at the Wawa, you come to a major light (go left and you're in the Home Depot/McDonald's parking lot).   In the center median - where there is a train spur because of the ports in the area - two men usually sit, one in a wheel chair and one on the pile of trash that has accumulated because of their stay.   The operator of the rail line periodically sweeps the trash out of the way for the infrequent trains, but it builds up.  The wheel chair guy is the guy that lectured me on my eating habits.   I have talked with them on occasion - the non-wheel chair guy is the "locomotion" for the wheel chair guy, and they "live" in the abandoned building across the side street from the Wawa, with the other wheel chair guy.  They like the building because it has ramps (formerly used by forklifts moving raw materials and product around the building).   Their world is content.  I don't know that I would use "happy", but they aren't looking to get back into society, nor to do anything other than what they are doing.   

Point of this is to say... what programs help these people?  What "giving" changes the game?   I'm not at all suggesting that the latter two examples WANT to be homeless, but they don't want to be in the ratrace either, and they seem have a profound mistrust of "The Man" (as evidenced by some conversations, including one where "The Good News Bible" was proudly proclaimed to be "the only law that matters" and "the only news I need".   Those positions have their consequences.  Society is a series of compromises no matter how you slice it, and the former clearly aren't willing to make the sort of compromises that give back to the society that is clearly giving them a pass at least so far.