Author Topic: Kentucky Clerk...how far can government go?  (Read 5142 times)

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Offline hefdaddy42

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Re: Kentucky Clerk...how far can government go?
« Reply #210 on: April 21, 2016, 07:23:13 AM »
Which passage says "Believers shall not hold public office"?
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Offline jammindude

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Re: Kentucky Clerk...how far can government go?
« Reply #211 on: April 21, 2016, 07:48:33 AM »
You're thinking in terms of "laws"...I'm speaking in terms of principles.

You must not murder is a law.

Loving your neighbor as yourself is a principle, because it speaks to the unspoken. We are not currently under any Biblical law that dictates that we should not commit adultery........but if you love your neighbor as yourself, you won't sleep with his wife. So it would still be a violation of Christian principles.

There is no law that says not to smoke, but there are principles that point out that it is a violation to pollute your body. You can put up the argument about other things besides smoking that pollute the body...but that doesn't change the fact that smoking is an obvious pollution of the body, and therefore a violation of how God teaches us to live in his word.
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Offline bosk1

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Re: Kentucky Clerk...how far can government go?
« Reply #212 on: April 21, 2016, 09:31:36 AM »
I agree that Biblical principles are there for a reason.  But I see no "law" or principle that forbids Christians from either holding public office or otherwise being "involved" in the political process by, for example, voting or being government employees.  The passages you cited do not speak to such things at all.  Idolatry is idolatry and has nothing to do with holding public office.  Moreover, there are several passages in the new testament that indicate respect for civil government is proper.  Romans 13:1-7, for example.  I think this article on the subject is pretty good (although I might quibble with a few of the subtle points):  https://bible.org/seriespage/33-christian-and-civil-government-romans-131-7  Good examples are when Paul is in custody toward the end of the book of Acts and preaches to Felix, Festus, and Agrippa.  He preaches the gospel and tries to convert them to Christianity.  But nowhere is there a hint of him trying to persuade them to leave office.  There are other examples of public officials in lower capacities that show a similar pattern.  Another good one is the Ethopian eunuch who was a high official in the court of Queen Candace who is converted by Philip in Acts 8. He is converted and then goes on his way rejoicing, presumably back to resume his office once he gets home.  There is no hint whatsoever of, "to convert, you have to give up your public office in order for God to actually accept you." 

That said, going back to the idea of principles, if a government position requires one to do things that are antithetical to Christianity, I agree that one might have to make the decision to leave that particular position in that situation to avoid being caught in a situation where they might compromise.  But that is a case by case thing since there is no rule.  And I would point out situations where faithful men held government offices and were clearly approved of by God:  Joseph, David, Daniel, for example.  Like you, I understand the proper place of the Old Testament and the relationship between Old Testament and New Testament, so I read those examples with caution knowing that much of what is written in the OT is inapplicable to Christianity.  However, in the NT, these men are uniformly praised, and there is no hint of condemnation for the fact that they held government offices.

So I go back to what I said earlier:  There is no Scriptural basis for saying Christians are prohibited from holding public office or otherwise being "involved" in politics, provided of course, that they do not violate other rules/principles in doing so. 
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Offline hefdaddy42

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Re: Kentucky Clerk...how far can government go?
« Reply #213 on: April 21, 2016, 10:39:30 AM »
You're thinking in terms of "laws"...I'm speaking in terms of principles.
I'm talking about a Biblical reason not to be involved in the political process.

None of the passages you listed actually provide that.
Hef is right on all things. Except for when I disagree with him. In which case he's probably still right.