Author Topic: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues  (Read 3053 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline lordxizor

  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 2487
  • Gender: Male
  • and that is the truth.
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #35 on: January 07, 2017, 09:21:49 AM »
Like many I have heartburn. It's pretty much directly related to how much and what I'm eating, so I know I just need to cut out certain foods. But those foods happen to be the foods I actually enjoy, so it's hard. I don't want to go on drugs. I'd rather reach a healthy point with eating, but cutting out anything fried, spicy, beer, or otherwise heartburn enducing sounds like no fun at all. I'll give it a ocuple more months of trying to eat healthy since the holidays are done now and if it doesn't go away I'll have to start taking something.

Offline El Barto

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 18875
  • Bad Craziness
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #36 on: January 07, 2017, 11:55:21 AM »
In my case it's the predisone that I'm on which causes my acid problems. It also doesn't help with sleep, obviously, but does get me whatever sleep meds I want. Plenty of days I take nothing. Some days it's just melatonin. If I've got something like a headache or a sore neck I'll take a generic benedryl. Great for sleep but I always wake up tired. As for the heavy stuff, I take ambien if something has screwed up my sleep schedule. Long weekend, or often times just one where I've been sleeping in. If I do something that amps me up I'll take a restoril (temazapam). Trick is to know all of their strengths and weaknesses.

As for acid and diet, who the hell knows. I'm from Texas. Everything we eat is made from peppers. Taqueria green sauce will occasionally light me up, but for the most part I'm just used to it. I only know of two things that get me every time. One's a particular restaurant (something about their chili) and the other is a particular brand of tamales.

From the helpful hints from Barto desk:
For the people taking prilosec, don't waste money on OTC. Get a scrip for generic omeprazole. Quite a bit cheaper in my case. Also, see if you can get by taking one every other day. That works great for me, but I can't go any lower than that (I did try, though).

Also, while it's not much of a problem for me anymore, for the folks getting up in the middle of the night, consider a red nightlight (assuming you need light to do your thing). Not mucking up your nightvision makes it easier to get back to sleep.
Argument, the presentation of reasonable views, never makes headway against conviction, and conviction takes no part in argument because it knows.
E.F. Benson

Offline KevShmev

  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 25868
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #37 on: January 07, 2017, 12:33:00 PM »
I don't intend on getting all crazy with my diet habits, but I will eat better to lose a few LBs and I will cut out stuff like O.J. and Powerade Zero, both of which it appear do not help my cause as far as acid buildup.  And apparently drinking milk on a full or mostly full stomach is a really bad idea, so I will have to stop that, too.

Also, I am 5'11" and weigh 210 lbs, so it's not like I am grossly overweight. Just have a little extra now in the gut. Turning 40 made that harder to shed easily. :censored

Offline Stadler

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 9491
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #38 on: January 07, 2017, 04:04:04 PM »
I'm 52 and take Simvistatin for my Cholesterol and Nexium OTC for my Barret's  disease.
So not horrible for my age. Beyond medicines, I really have no nagging aches or pain so I'm fortunate in that respect.
And my prostate is normal says the two fingers that go up my ass.

What does it say about me that my first thought was "whose two fingers?"

Offline TAC

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 24259
  • Gender: Male
  • Just a decent, normal metal-head fellow
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #39 on: January 07, 2017, 04:14:19 PM »
It means that Tick has succeeded with his post.
would have thought the same thing but seeing the OP was TAC i immediately thought Maiden or DT related
Winger Theater Forums................or WTF.  ;D

Offline millahh

  • Retired Pedantic Bastard
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 3299
  • Gender: Male
  • RIP Mark
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #40 on: January 07, 2017, 05:45:41 PM »
Epic bump!!

Had an endoscopy done this week...the procedure itself was as easy as I was told it would be.  They put the round thing in your mouth (that the tube into your stomach goes through), hit you with the anesthesia through the IV they had put in a vein on top of your hand, and then next thing you know, you are waking up in recovery. 

Anyway, I went because I have had nausea off and on for much of the last year, like that feeling you could throw up, although I never do. I can barely eat and my stomach will feel full and bloated.  No ulcers, but I have a small hiatus hernia, which they said can be easily treated by losing some weight (I fluctuate between a 10-15 lb difference, and am currently on the higher end of that right now, so there's the extra incentive I needed). I don't have acid reflux, but apparently the acid does build up in my stomach, which causes the nausea sometimes, and that can be treated by taking Omeprazole once or twice a day shortly before eating. Hopefully, those do the trick.  :coolio

Sounds like functional dyspepsia or maybe ideopathic gastroparesis (absence of vomiting makes me think more FD than IG).  Metoclopramide can help, but it's got some significant safety issues, so is typically only given for short term.

As far as omeprazole (and esomeprazole), chronic use is tricky, due to the bone issue and the increased stroke risk.  I think it's too late to put the genie back in the bottle, but if FDA could take it off the shelf and make it prescription-only, they would.  It's only approved for chronic use in erosive esophagitis (though it is obviously widely used beyond that).

I turned 40 over the summer, at this point the only issues are high blood pressure (which came out of nowhere, and it work-related), and slowing metabolism making weight-management trickier.
Quote from: parallax
WHEN WILL YOU ADRESS MY MONKEY ARGUMENT???? NEVER???? THAT\' WHAT I FIGURED.:lol

Offline Phoenix87x

  • From the ashes
  • Posts: 4905
  • Gender: Male
  • The Phoenix shall rise
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #41 on: January 07, 2017, 06:03:36 PM »
And also with the Proton Pump Inhibitors, besides the osteoporosis risk, there's also the increased risk of clostridium difficile infection as well, since it thrives in the higher PH environment.

I would recommend trying Pepcid or Zantac first before going to a PPI as they are more of a middle of the road option, with Prilosec being for most severe cases and Tums being for mild cases. Might be worth trying Tums first as well, but from the sounds of it, you may needs something a bit stronger which is where the Pepcid or zantac comes in.

I would avoid the metoclopramide (reglan) unless absolutely necessary. Its dopamine receptor antagonism can lead to tardive dyskinesia and only has a 12 week cap, so alternatives should be pursued. At the end of the day it has have similar mechanism of action to anti-psychotic medication.
All people die, but not many people ever truly live

Offline millahh

  • Retired Pedantic Bastard
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 3299
  • Gender: Male
  • RIP Mark
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #42 on: January 07, 2017, 06:06:51 PM »

I would avoid the metoclopramide (reglan). Its dopamine receptor antagonism can lead to tardive dyskinesia and only has a 12 week cap, so alternatives should be pursued. At the end of the day it has have similar mechanism of action to anti-psychotic medication.

I see I'm not the only pharma guy on here!  I'm actually the R&D program lead on a gastroparesis drug.
Quote from: parallax
WHEN WILL YOU ADRESS MY MONKEY ARGUMENT???? NEVER???? THAT\' WHAT I FIGURED.:lol

Offline Phoenix87x

  • From the ashes
  • Posts: 4905
  • Gender: Male
  • The Phoenix shall rise
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #43 on: January 07, 2017, 06:09:10 PM »
That's very cool.

I am 4 months aways from graduation, then I'll be a legit pharmacist. Until then, I just play one on TV  ;)
All people die, but not many people ever truly live

Offline KevShmev

  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 25868
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #44 on: January 08, 2017, 10:38:34 AM »
Epic bump!!

Had an endoscopy done this week...the procedure itself was as easy as I was told it would be.  They put the round thing in your mouth (that the tube into your stomach goes through), hit you with the anesthesia through the IV they had put in a vein on top of your hand, and then next thing you know, you are waking up in recovery. 

Anyway, I went because I have had nausea off and on for much of the last year, like that feeling you could throw up, although I never do. I can barely eat and my stomach will feel full and bloated.  No ulcers, but I have a small hiatus hernia, which they said can be easily treated by losing some weight (I fluctuate between a 10-15 lb difference, and am currently on the higher end of that right now, so there's the extra incentive I needed). I don't have acid reflux, but apparently the acid does build up in my stomach, which causes the nausea sometimes, and that can be treated by taking Omeprazole once or twice a day shortly before eating. Hopefully, those do the trick.  :coolio

Sounds like functional dyspepsia or maybe ideopathic gastroparesis (absence of vomiting makes me think more FD than IG).  Metoclopramide can help, but it's got some significant safety issues, so is typically only given for short term.

Looking that up, it sounds like that is what it could be, which leads to the question is, how is it that you knew that right away, but my regular MD and the gastroenterologist I saw had no clue?  I get that doctors love the idea of various procedures to try and find the problem, making us spend lots of money, but it's crazy that neither ever uttered those words.

Apparently, the small hiatus hernia I have can easily be fixed by losing a little weight, so that is the immediate goal.

Offline millahh

  • Retired Pedantic Bastard
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 3299
  • Gender: Male
  • RIP Mark
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #45 on: January 08, 2017, 12:08:59 PM »
Epic bump!!

Had an endoscopy done this week...the procedure itself was as easy as I was told it would be.  They put the round thing in your mouth (that the tube into your stomach goes through), hit you with the anesthesia through the IV they had put in a vein on top of your hand, and then next thing you know, you are waking up in recovery. 

Anyway, I went because I have had nausea off and on for much of the last year, like that feeling you could throw up, although I never do. I can barely eat and my stomach will feel full and bloated.  No ulcers, but I have a small hiatus hernia, which they said can be easily treated by losing some weight (I fluctuate between a 10-15 lb difference, and am currently on the higher end of that right now, so there's the extra incentive I needed). I don't have acid reflux, but apparently the acid does build up in my stomach, which causes the nausea sometimes, and that can be treated by taking Omeprazole once or twice a day shortly before eating. Hopefully, those do the trick.  :coolio

Sounds like functional dyspepsia or maybe ideopathic gastroparesis (absence of vomiting makes me think more FD than IG).  Metoclopramide can help, but it's got some significant safety issues, so is typically only given for short term.

Looking that up, it sounds like that is what it could be, which leads to the question is, how is it that you knew that right away, but my regular MD and the gastroenterologist I saw had no clue?  I get that doctors love the idea of various procedures to try and find the problem, making us spend lots of money, but it's crazy that neither ever uttered those words.

Apparently, the small hiatus hernia I have can easily be fixed by losing a little weight, so that is the immediate goal.

Well, it's complicated.  I know it because I work on multiple drugs for GI transit disorders.  But what I now and what doctors know will be a bit different, especially when it comes to something like FD.  FDA hasn't really defined down FD to a point where it's a real indication...and therefore there are no treatments for it yet (that said, I expect there will be a guidance on this in the next couple of years, and am proactively planning for it for one of my programs).  Thing is, your symptoms are what they are, regardless of what it's called...calling it FD, or calling it a combo of nausea, bloating, early satiety, etc. really doesn't make a difference in how it's treated.  It's really a collection of symptoms rather that something with an identified root case that can be addressed.

You mentioned procedures...has the gastro suggested scintigraphy?  The endoscopy is pretty standard to try to understand if there is an observable cause in situations like yours. 
Quote from: parallax
WHEN WILL YOU ADRESS MY MONKEY ARGUMENT???? NEVER???? THAT\' WHAT I FIGURED.:lol

Offline KevShmev

  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 25868
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #46 on: January 08, 2017, 12:12:49 PM »
No. He wants me to get an ultrasound for my gall bladder, too, but that seems like overkill.  And making me spend more money.

The results of the endoscopy were:

Small hiatus hernia.
Erythematous mucous in the antrum. Biopsied. (results early this week, he said)
Normal examined Duodenum.

I typed those directly from the paperwork I was given.

Offline millahh

  • Retired Pedantic Bastard
  • Moderator Emeritus
  • *****
  • Posts: 3299
  • Gender: Male
  • RIP Mark
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #47 on: January 08, 2017, 01:36:11 PM »
No. He wants me to get an ultrasound for my gall bladder, too, but that seems like overkill.  And making me spend more money.

The results of the endoscopy were:

Small hiatus hernia.
Erythematous mucous in the antrum. Biopsied. (results early this week, he said)
Normal examined Duodenum.

I typed those directly from the paperwork I was given.

On a quick look, the gall bladder test was likely inspired by the mucous in the antrum, test is to rule out gastritis.  But now we're getting out of my wheelhouse...most of what i know is about where the goalposts are for getting drugs approved (both safety and efficacy), rather than diagnosis in real, actual people.

Back to the thread title, stepped on the scale this morning, was pissed.  Weight has continued to go up, despite working out a lot.  Think I may to the "ten week challenge" at my kickboxing place, just just go balls-out and drop about 15 pounds.  Stupid stress hormones....
Quote from: parallax
WHEN WILL YOU ADRESS MY MONKEY ARGUMENT???? NEVER???? THAT\' WHAT I FIGURED.:lol

Offline KevShmev

  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 25868
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #48 on: January 08, 2017, 07:19:20 PM »
He recommended the gall bladder ultrasound the same day we scheduled the endoscopy, and he seemed put off that I hadn't scheduled it yet, but I wanted to see what came back on this first.

Online CrimsonSunrise

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 3046
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #49 on: January 08, 2017, 11:49:46 PM »
Well Kev... the positive is your results seem clear of Esophageal Cancer.  Or for that matter you seem to be clear of the pre-cursors.  No Barrett's or low/High grade dysplasia.  I'm now 4 years cancer free, Esophageal Cancer.  Definitely something I would hate for anyone to go through.

My newest "Fogey" issue is my heart.  Just spent 5 days in the hospital 2 months ago for cardiac issues.  End result was getting a couple arterial stents put into my heart.  Thing is....  until I hit 49 I was in fantastic shape.  No serious issues whatsoever.  Now?  I feel like a shipwreck...LOL.  Point is,  be aware of your health issues guys, and don't ignore any warning signs. I never thought I would have these issues so young, being in relatively fit shape.

Offline cramx3

  • Chillest of the chill
  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 15909
  • Gender: Male
    • The Home of cramx3
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #50 on: January 09, 2017, 11:49:51 AM »
But not to be too personal here, the BIGGEST pain in the ass is - literally - the dreaded hemorrhoid.  I've had them before, apparently mild, and short, but it seems like it's been a constant friend dropping by (again literally) for a visit every couple weeks or so.  I had a colonoscopy about a year or so ago, but I'm going to try to get to my doctor (who's a male) this month and have a look see.  I've hesitated, because the last time I had the "finger" it was there, but it was one of his PA's, and she was really cute (in a Cote de Pablo/Gal Gadot kind of way) and I was EXTREMELY self-conscious about that.   Sorry, TMI - Too Much Ick.   :)

Well since you went this route.... i had to get anal surgery about a year ago.  I had a fistula abscess that needed to be removed.  Anyway, after the surgery and all, it turns out now I have a hemorrhoid problem.  The doc said it was likely due to the surgery and no big deal.  I mean, for the most part it is not a problem at all.  However, going to the butt doctor and getting the finger up the butt was maybe one of my worst life experiences and the doc constantly telling me to relax while the nurse looks at me getting penetrated by another man was a sight/sound I never wish to experience again.  I was told to come back for regular check ups and I have not.  Well I haven't needed to really.  A high fiber diet really helps with the hemorroid and I only notice pain when I eat a lot of spicy foods or a drink a lot of alcohol without eating appropriately. 

As for the rest of this thread, I dread getting older.  I could see myself having an enlarging prostate as over time I go to the bathroom more quickly, but it hasn't gotten to the point where I go throughout the night or anyhting (maybe once at night every few nights, but I also usually sleep with water next to me that I drink throughout the night).  And any more serious anal searching is not something I want to deal with... or even worse, sticking something inside my dick  :censored

Offline Hyperplex

  • High Level Static
  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 3858
  • Gender: Male
  • Do not speak unless you can improve the silence.
    • Hyperplexia.net
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #51 on: January 09, 2017, 12:27:10 PM »
My newest "Fogey" issue is my heart.  Just spent 5 days in the hospital 2 months ago for cardiac issues.  End result was getting a couple arterial stents put into my heart.  Thing is....  until I hit 49 I was in fantastic shape.  No serious issues whatsoever.  Now?  I feel like a shipwreck...LOL.  Point is,  be aware of your health issues guys, and don't ignore any warning signs. I never thought I would have these issues so young, being in relatively fit shape.

My father had a double that became a triple angioplasty back in 1998 (they intended to place two stents, but wound up finding two blockages in one artery so, 3 stents instead). Apparently he had been having angina attacks for weeks and just ignored them. When he went for a checkup his doc gave him a stress test and he failed abyssmally so there went that. Not long after, he was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. He is not very good at taking care of himself, and swears up and down to this day that the only reason he had the heart problems was because he smoked for 20 years til he was almost 40. He refuses to count his diet and weight as contirbuting factors. You are absoutely right – ignore nothing.

I guess I should really quit being cryptic and just talk about my issues. I suffer from depression and anxiety, GERD, IBS, and high cholesterol. And I'm only 34. Both of my parents and all of my grandparents have or had high cholesterol, so I definitely have the predisposition to it. My diet has done up and down over the years but my levels are under control on medication. My IBS is controlled with escitalopram (Lexapro for brand name) and that doubles for my depression. I supplement the escitalopram with bupropion (Wellbutrin for brand) and it also helps my depression, to a degree. It helps me better manage things, and I've noticed very few negative side effects personally. They help a lot. For my anxiety, I have lorazepam that I take as needed. I try not to lean on it too much, but it's there if I need it. I take Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) for my GERD, and it works wonders for me.

The latest curveball thrown my way was low T. It's something that really hit me hard because it just felt like yet another thing wrong with me, even if it was out of my control. After several months of different things and tests, assuring my pituitary gland was normal and all that, biweekly T injections have been keeping my levels right where they should be. It's a very personal thing for me, something I'm really not comfortable sharing in any way but I felt kinda like an ass for not saying stuff before.

Overall, I'm actually in good health, despite needing to lose weight. Doc isn't too worried about me, and currently other than my diet, the best thing I could do for myself is find a therapist. I've been stupidly resistant to doing it, but I think I really should.


There, sorry. -_-
"My melancholy wants to rest in the hiding places and abysses of perfection. This is why I need music." –Friedrich Nietzsche

Online CrimsonSunrise

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 3046
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #52 on: January 09, 2017, 12:50:51 PM »


My father had a double that became a triple angioplasty back in 1998 (they intended to place two stents, but wound up finding two blockages in one artery so, 3 stents instead). Apparently he had been having angina attacks for weeks and just ignored them. When he went for a checkup his doc gave him a stress test and he failed abyssmally so there went that. Not long after, he was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes. He is not very good at taking care of himself, and swears up and down to this day that the only reason he had the heart problems was because he smoked for 20 years til he was almost 40. He refuses to count his diet and weight as contirbuting factors. You are absoutely right – ignore nothing.

I guess I should really quit being cryptic and just talk about my issues. I suffer from depression and anxiety, GERD, IBS, and high cholesterol. And I'm only 34. Both of my parents and all of my grandparents have or had high cholesterol, so I definitely have the predisposition to it. My diet has done up and down over the years but my levels are under control on medication. My IBS is controlled with escitalopram (Lexapro for brand name) and that doubles for my depression. I supplement the escitalopram with bupropion (Wellbutrin for brand) and it also helps my depression, to a degree. It helps me better manage things, and I've noticed very few negative side effects personally. They help a lot. For my anxiety, I have lorazepam that I take as needed. I try not to lean on it too much, but it's there if I need it. I take Dexilant (dexlansoprazole) for my GERD, and it works wonders for me.

The latest curveball thrown my way was low T. It's something that really hit me hard because it just felt like yet another thing wrong with me, even if it was out of my control. After several months of different things and tests, assuring my pituitary gland was normal and all that, biweekly T injections have been keeping my levels right where they should be. It's a very personal thing for me, something I'm really not comfortable sharing in any way but I felt kinda like an ass for not saying stuff before.

Overall, I'm actually in good health, despite needing to lose weight. Doc isn't too worried about me, and currently other than my diet, the best thing I could do for myself is find a therapist. I've been stupidly resistant to doing it, but I think I really should.


There, sorry. -_-

Well, you have your plate full, especially for how young you are.  Unlike your pops, you seem to be doing your best to be pro-active and not just sticking your head in the sand.  That's half the battle!  Kudos Brother!

Offline KevShmev

  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 25868
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #53 on: January 09, 2017, 07:31:13 PM »
Agreed. Being pro-active. regarding physical or mental help, is always a good thing.  Heck, I am in a good place mentally, despite a few health issues (the stomach thing, apnea), but I still go to a professional counselor every few months just for a chat. I've been going to her off and on for like 6-7 years. And I have no shame in saying that. Good mental health is underrated.  :biggrin:

Well Kev... the positive is your results seem clear of Esophageal Cancer.  Or for that matter you seem to be clear of the pre-cursors.  No Barrett's or low/High grade dysplasia.  I'm now 4 years cancer free, Esophageal Cancer.  Definitely something I would hate for anyone to go through.


Interesting.  Good to hear, for sure. and glad to hear you are cancer free!! :tup :tup

Online CrimsonSunrise

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 3046
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #54 on: January 09, 2017, 07:44:11 PM »
Agreed. Being pro-active. regarding physical or mental help, is always a good thing.  Heck, I am in a good place mentally, despite a few health issues (the stomach thing, apnea), but I still go to a professional counselor every few months just for a chat. I've been going to her off and on for like 6-7 years. And I have no shame in saying that. Good mental health is underrated.  :biggrin:



Interesting.  Good to hear, for sure. and glad to hear you are cancer free!! :tup :tup

That's actually a really good idea to do counseling appointments a couple/few times a year. It's the insurance that usually doesn't cover it for me that's the killer...but I'll have to research it a bit.

Offline cramx3

  • Chillest of the chill
  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 15909
  • Gender: Male
    • The Home of cramx3
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #55 on: January 10, 2017, 06:31:24 AM »
I still go to a professional counselor every few months just for a chat. I've been going to her off and on for like 6-7 years. And I have no shame in saying that. Good mental health is underrated.  :biggrin:

That's good.  I think about how Tony Soprano viewed going to Dr. Melfi as a sign of weakness, but that is so not true in reality.  I think people who see therapists/psychologist/psychiatrist on their own will are probably pretty strong people.

Offline Hyperplex

  • High Level Static
  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 3858
  • Gender: Male
  • Do not speak unless you can improve the silence.
    • Hyperplexia.net
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #56 on: January 10, 2017, 07:11:32 AM »
I don't have a block over any feeling of weakness. I guess you could call it skepticism. I've tried mental calming techniques, meditation, stuff like that, and have had little to no success. I guess I'm afraid even a professional won't be able to help me, won't be able to teach me how to better cope. Like, if I've tried and failed for my entire life, how will someone else be able to tell what the right thing to do is? Not that they are ineffective, but that I am this impenetrable thing that is somehow resistant to typical techniques.

It's irrational not to try, I know, I just have this block about it; I haven't made a call yet.
"My melancholy wants to rest in the hiding places and abysses of perfection. This is why I need music." –Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline cramx3

  • Chillest of the chill
  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 15909
  • Gender: Male
    • The Home of cramx3
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #57 on: January 10, 2017, 07:38:30 AM »
Like, if I've tried and failed for my entire life, how will someone else be able to tell what the right thing to do is?

Because they can offer a different perspective.  Although I am not totally sure such a person is there to tell you the right thing to do.  Have you seen someone before though?  You said you've tried other methods that haven't worked so what harm is done by trying something new?

Offline Hyperplex

  • High Level Static
  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 3858
  • Gender: Male
  • Do not speak unless you can improve the silence.
    • Hyperplexia.net
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #58 on: January 10, 2017, 08:40:12 AM »
You're right. I just have to get through this block and pick up the phone to call someone.
"My melancholy wants to rest in the hiding places and abysses of perfection. This is why I need music." –Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Stadler

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 9491
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #59 on: January 10, 2017, 09:15:15 AM »
I don't have a block over any feeling of weakness. I guess you could call it skepticism. I've tried mental calming techniques, meditation, stuff like that, and have had little to no success. I guess I'm afraid even a professional won't be able to help me, won't be able to teach me how to better cope. Like, if I've tried and failed for my entire life, how will someone else be able to tell what the right thing to do is? Not that they are ineffective, but that I am this impenetrable thing that is somehow resistant to typical techniques.

It's irrational not to try, I know, I just have this block about it; I haven't made a call yet.

I should tell you I agreed - kicking and screaming - to see a therapist as part of a marriage thing back in 2006, 2007, and, with a few gaps here and there, I have been seeing a therapist regularly, since.  Currently, I see her once a week, almost like clockwork.

Look, it's pretty simple: if you go in expecting to fail, I can pretty much assure you it's going to fail.   

I grew up in an old-school Eastern European housefold.  Therapy was for nutjobs.   For "normal people" like us, it was just a matter of toughening up, no one needs to know our bidnis.   One of the things that amazes me even 10 years later, is just how NOT true those statements are.    We may have differences in terms of what our beliefs are, or what our predilections are, but there are remarkable consistencies and patterns to the human brain.  No, it's not an exact science ("You have 2.6 microliters of flambergaster in your cranial fluid, therefore you are 18% bipolar and 64 degrees of obsessive compulsive.").   But, with HUGE caveat that you only get out what you put in - in terms of honesty, disclosure, and self-awareness - there are tons of benefits to having someone to talk to. 

Please give it an honest, open-minded try.  What's the worst that happens?   

Offline gmillerdrake

  • Proud Father.....Blessed Husband
  • DTF.org Member
  • *
  • Posts: 10387
  • Gender: Male
  • 1 Timothy 2:5
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #60 on: January 10, 2017, 09:21:43 AM »
Like, if I've tried and failed for my entire life, how will someone else be able to tell what the right thing to do is?

Because they can offer a different perspective. 

Totally this. The counseling I've went through revealed things to me that seem like 'no kidding' moments.....like, "why didn't I see that?" and in my case being that I was dealing with sexual abuse my therapist basically said plainly that I was unable to see some of these revelations due to me being the victim in the situation. I literally needed a trained professional to help me realize the most obvious of things.

I have ZERO regrets about seeking counseling and highly recommend it.
Without Faith.....Without Hope.....There can be No Peace of Mind

Offline cramx3

  • Chillest of the chill
  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 15909
  • Gender: Male
    • The Home of cramx3
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #61 on: January 10, 2017, 09:58:45 AM »
Like, if I've tried and failed for my entire life, how will someone else be able to tell what the right thing to do is?

Because they can offer a different perspective. 

Totally this. The counseling I've went through revealed things to me that seem like 'no kidding' moments.....like, "why didn't I see that?" and in my case being that I was dealing with sexual abuse my therapist basically said plainly that I was unable to see some of these revelations due to me being the victim in the situation. I literally needed a trained professional to help me realize the most obvious of things.

I have ZERO regrets about seeking counseling and highly recommend it.

I can take this example outside of therapy.  Just at work, if I am frustrated with solving an issue, sometimes it helps to ask someone else like my coworker to take a look.  Everyone sees things from their own, different, perspective.  And I can't tell you how  many times my coworker would be like "Oh yea its simple" and boom it's done and I sit back and wonder "wow how did I not see that?" and it's because you get yourself into tunnel vision and sometimes its hard to see from different angles.  I feel like therapy can be the EXACT same thing, it's right in front of you but our vision gets blurry because we are so involved in it that we can't see it.

Offline Hyperplex

  • High Level Static
  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 3858
  • Gender: Male
  • Do not speak unless you can improve the silence.
    • Hyperplexia.net
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #62 on: January 10, 2017, 10:41:36 AM »
Once I get up the gumption to call, I will have every hope in the world that it will work. I will be scared of it failing. I realize I need to do it. Just have to unwrinkle my brain a bit to kick myself in the ass.

Thanks guys.
"My melancholy wants to rest in the hiding places and abysses of perfection. This is why I need music." –Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Stadler

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 9491
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #63 on: January 10, 2017, 11:12:46 AM »
It is more than just perspective, though, even if that is a big part of it.   There ARE patterns to the human brain.  There are consistencies.  Yes, we're all individuals, we're all unique in our own way, yadda yadda yadda, but there are still uniformities. It's not a coincidence that, for example, things start as one thing and often manifest as anger.   So a trained therapist can often walk back the cat to get past the anger and other "base" emotions, and get to the heart of what's at hand. 

Offline KevShmev

  • EZBoard Elder
  • *****
  • Posts: 25868
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #64 on: January 10, 2017, 07:25:17 PM »
The key to seeing a trained professional is not just getting up the nerve to do it, which can be a hill to climb, but finding a good one.  I was lucky to find one who is really good.

Offline cramx3

  • Chillest of the chill
  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 15909
  • Gender: Male
    • The Home of cramx3
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #65 on: January 11, 2017, 07:54:08 AM »
The key to seeing a trained professional is not just getting up the nerve to do it, which can be a hill to climb, but finding a good one.  I was lucky to find one who is really good.

It's funny cause the first time I saw a therapist it was because my relationship with my ex-fiance was getting to the point of ending and she wanted to save it and since she is a psychologist she thought we should see someone.  I was very much against it because I just knew the relationship was over and not going to be saved, but I gave in and we went.  It was one session together to kind of get to know us and then we each did a session alone and then one more session together.... but I actually kind of enjoyed it.  I just told him how I felt, he pretty much called me a pussy for not just breaking up with her and at the end I told her so to which her response was "well he was just a bad therapist, let's see someone else" which never happened and we eventually broke up... but a little later I ended up going going back to this therapist for other reasons and I think he's great.

Offline Stadler

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 9491
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #66 on: January 11, 2017, 09:16:39 AM »
Well, that's part of the intangible; a therapist that doesn't tell you what you want to hear is not a "bad therapist".  A therapist that doesn't listen or isn't empathetic, or isn't moving you toward YOUR goals (YOURS not theirs, or your partners) is a "bad therapist". 

Offline j

  • Posts: 2793
  • Gender: Male
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #67 on: January 11, 2017, 03:12:54 PM »
Just a heads up regarding PPIs (a la omeprazole), there's some new data suggesting a link between long term use and Alzheimer's dementia.  Causation hasn't been proven or anything but I think I recall at least one study from last year that showed a strong association.

Barto is doing what I suggested my dad do as well: just drop your dose/frequency as low as you can go with your symptoms reasonably controlled.  Alternatively, consider an H2 blocker instead (ranitidine, Pepcid, etc), although anecdotally, I think PPIs tend to provide better symptomatic relief which makes sense given their mechanism of action.

-J

EDIT:
Re: "functional dyspepsia" is what is known as a diagnosis of exclusion, i.e. your regular doctor/GI doctor are probably trying to rule out more serious, potentially life threatening causes of your symptoms first.  I'm not a family doc, but that's fairly standard practice.

Re: cute chick doing your rectal exam, would you rather be a little embarrassed in front of her, or get stuck with a dude with much bigger fingers?  Hard decision for some, luckily you're not usually given a choice. :lol
« Last Edit: January 11, 2017, 03:18:38 PM by j »

Offline El Barto

  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 18875
  • Bad Craziness
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #68 on: January 11, 2017, 03:36:28 PM »
The tricky part of figuring out a lower prilosec dose is the tendency towards a rebound. When I got to one every 3 days I started feeling pretty crappy and went back to two, but I can't say for sure that it wasn't just a temporary rebound.

And I'll check with my docs about H2 blockers. I think that's what they initially put me on after the transplant but after I called an bitched that it wasn't working they said to give prilosec a shot. However, at that point I was taking 6x the amount of prednisone. Now that I'm on a relatively small maintenance dose the H2 blocker might work better for me. I've never been all that comfortable taking the omeprazole long term.
Argument, the presentation of reasonable views, never makes headway against conviction, and conviction takes no part in argument because it knows.
E.F. Benson

Offline kingshmegland

  • defender of the brew!
  • DTF.org Alumni
  • ****
  • Posts: 36163
  • Gender: Male
  • Take that Beethoven, you deaf bastard!!
Re: Mens Health - Mostly Fogey issues
« Reply #69 on: January 11, 2017, 03:40:19 PM »
I've played around with how long I can go with takingomeprazole and it's every other day for me unless I know spicyfood is in the future. 
“I don't like country music, but I don't mean to denigrate those who do. And for the people who like country music, denigrate means 'put down'.” - Bob Newhart

So wait, we're spelling it wrong and king is spelling it right? What is going on here? :lol -- BlobVanDam