Author Topic: Privacy and anonymity  (Read 11141 times)

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Offline Scheavo

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #35 on: August 02, 2012, 07:23:29 PM »
I would define an "Invasion of Privacy" as: A method to acquire information by the use of fraud, deception, coercion or force.

I would say that what many of the companies do to gain the information they have, is deceptive. For the simple fact that most people don't know it's going on, it's deceptive. When you use Google, there is no disclaimer saying how Google keeps, stores and tracks you.

Especially when Google bypasses other security settings and browser settings to still get what they want. In some sense, you could call that force.

I guess I don't shop at Target enough to know what they do, didn't even know they had a card system or whatnot, but I imagine it something like a points or reward system. Perhaps somewhere in the legalese there's something about using this information for such and such a purpose, but most people probably won't understand it. They're signing up for a point system, not a way to track and monitor your shopping habits. That's what people, by and large, are going to think. The idea that everyone is going to make a rational decision, etc, is really an unrealistic optimistic view of humanity.
I understand why people provide data to these stores.  I don't understand why people provide real data to them.  All those forms are submitted to data entry people who don't give a damn what you call yourself.  My Tom Thumb card saves me a bunch in gas, and all the demographic info they get is for Mr. Wigglestaff at 123 Fake St. (with a proper zip code).  They're welcome to track my purchases all they want.  They're welcome to print targeted coupons on my receipts. What they're not welcome to do is to solicit me further or sell my info to outside interests. 

And from the helpful hints from Barto desk, if you need to purchase implements to commit a felony, pay full price.  Don't use your reward card to save 49 cents on your jumbo sized box of rat poison. 


I understand why people provide data to these stores.  I don't understand why people provide real data to them.

Because most people tend to trust other people, and are sincere. Not that I think you aren't sincere, but I do think you have a little more distrust of people than the average person.

Oh, and add stupidity to the list as well.

Offline Sigz

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #36 on: August 02, 2012, 07:44:26 PM »
Do you consider your search history public information? Because Google keeps that, and it uses what cookies you have, what your browser history is, in order to give you the information they think you want. You did not give Google that information, and most likely did not consent for them to have that information.

You consent to it when you create an account, and can disable and delete any and all history they store at any time you wish: google.com/history
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Offline Orthogonal

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #37 on: August 02, 2012, 08:11:18 PM »
I would say that what many of the companies do to gain the information they have, is deceptive. For the simple fact that most people don't know it's going on, it's deceptive. When you use Google, there is no disclaimer saying how Google keeps, stores and tracks you.

Especially when Google bypasses other security settings and browser settings to still get what they want. In some sense, you could call that force.

Could be, you have to take it on a case-by-case basis. Data mining your search history would not likely fall under deception. Tracking you with a Cookie, a case could be made that it is deceptive. Bypassing security settings, depends on the situation, but that would more likely fall under deception.

Offline Scheavo

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #38 on: August 02, 2012, 08:42:46 PM »
Do you consider your search history public information? Because Google keeps that, and it uses what cookies you have, what your browser history is, in order to give you the information they think you want. You did not give Google that information, and most likely did not consent for them to have that information.

You consent to it when you create an account, and can disable and delete any and all history they store at any time you wish: google.com/history

Even though I  make sure I'm logged out of Google before I do any web searches, I just went to that history page, and guess what? They have every search I've done.

On top of that, the history settings was set to "paused."

So, even though I'm not using my account, and my account is set not to store history, they have my search history.

You couldn't have made my point better for me if I asked.



Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #39 on: August 02, 2012, 09:01:53 PM »
And do they know who you are?
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Offline Scheavo

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #40 on: August 02, 2012, 09:18:15 PM »
If they cared to try, it wouldn't be all that hard (my gmail account is my first and last name, and I'm the only person with my name in the world). Ya, you could say I shouldn't use my name as my account name, but like I said before, it's a lost battle and at some point I don't try. Even if I didn't give them my name, I'm be willing to bet they could find it out. The modern internet relies upon data mining and data collection, and Google's entire business model is centered on the idea of collecting data. Somewhere along the line, I had to use 100% accurate information to handle my student loans, including my email. I'm sure that information is available, especially for someone like Google.

But, we do have a lot more anonymity online than we do privacy. If someone starts looking, than we have no privacy. Luckily, for the most part, no one's looking at you.

Offline Sigz

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #41 on: August 03, 2012, 01:01:53 AM »
Do you consider your search history public information? Because Google keeps that, and it uses what cookies you have, what your browser history is, in order to give you the information they think you want. You did not give Google that information, and most likely did not consent for them to have that information.

You consent to it when you create an account, and can disable and delete any and all history they store at any time you wish: google.com/history

Even though I  make sure I'm logged out of Google before I do any web searches, I just went to that history page, and guess what? They have every search I've done.

On top of that, the history settings was set to "paused."

So, even though I'm not using my account, and my account is set not to store history, they have my search history.

You couldn't have made my point better for me if I asked.

Well yeah, you're not using your account, and by default they store your search history. If you logged in, deleted and made sure history was paused, this wouldn't be an issue.
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Offline Scheavo

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #42 on: August 03, 2012, 01:30:13 AM »
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Well yeah, you're not using your account, and by default they store your search history. If you logged in, deleted and made sure history was paused, this wouldn't be an issue.

But see, the searches I made while not using my account were tied to my account, even though my account had history paused (it clearly said: search history is paused). I remember pausing it a while ago. So, basically, you have to explain how it is that Google knew that it was me doing those searches, despite not being logged in. You also have to explain why those searches were saved to my account, even though the settings on my account were to not save. And even if you do all of that, you basically just admitted that Google will, by default, save your information if you're not signed in, thus doing away with the argument that you agreed for that data to be collected because you created an account, and are using that account. There is nothing on the Google page that lets you know this information will be saved, used, etc, and there is nothing to indicate that making a search is signing a contract to let them do this.

Or, are you saying that I'm supposed to do all my searches while logged in, with my account, and just hope that Google is being honest when they say they won't save and use my search history, data, etc? Talk about letting the fox guard the hen house.





Offline Sigz

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #43 on: August 03, 2012, 09:57:03 AM »
Or, are you saying that I'm supposed to do all my searches while logged in, with my account, and just hope that Google is being honest when they say they won't save and use my search history, data, etc? Talk about letting the fox guard the hen house.

Dude, almost by definition ensuring one's privacy is based on trust. Whenever you use the internet, phone, mail, a credit card, christ even just buying hemorrhoid cream at the local walgreens, you are trusting that the other party involved is not going to retain and/or abuse the information they gain from that.


So, basically, you have to explain how it is that Google knew that it was me doing those searches, despite not being logged in. You also have to explain why those searches were saved to my account, even though the settings on my account were to not save.

Well, websites have these things called cookies, which track past usage. Why they got saved to your account is beyond me. It's actually pretty irrelevant though - the point is millions of users, myself included, use google all the time and have a clear search history with them. Just because something's screwy for your situation does not suddenly mean Google is out to get you.

I have no idea if Google's lying when they say they don't save the data. My suspicion would be in cases where the user disables search history is that they save the search data and say "all these searches came from one person", but don't save any identifying information, and I'm fine with that. But in the end given the services they provide, I'd say they actually do a pretty good job of explaining their privacy policies and giving the user options regarding them.
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Offline Scheavo

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #44 on: August 03, 2012, 12:05:20 PM »
I never said Google is out to get me, or even implied that, so please don't put words in my mouth. I said that Google has an inherent interest to keep data about my searches, and to mine that data for information that it can then use to not only give me targeted advertisements, which gives them money, but to also learn more about other consumers, so that they can do the same.

And like I said before, the internet does provide us, still, with a great bit of anonymity. That's one reason I'm not terribly paranoid about the whole thing (I take some easy steps to curtail tracking, but I don't go nearly as far as, say, EB). However, all the data Google has is accessible to someone, if they started looking for it.  Especially the government. And that's where we get into the classic situations of invasions of privacy. These companies are the tools by which your privacy can be invaded, which if they didn't exist, would mean your privacy wouldn't be invaded. If these companies didn't track all that information, if they didn't even store it, then no one anywhere, under any circumstances, could use that data to invade my privacy.

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Dude, almost by definition ensuring one's privacy is based on trust. Whenever you use the internet, phone, mail, a credit card, christ even just buying hemorrhoid cream at the local Walgreen, you are trusting that the other party involved is not going to retain and/or abuse the information they gain from that.

The person at the local Walgreen has no interest in why I bought hemorrhoid cream. It's not in the in their direct business model to know. All he cares about is getting money from me, and probably nothing else. It is in Google direct business model to know why I bought hemorrhoid cream, what else I bought, etc. Because it wants to then give me an advertisement on some news page about some better hemorrhoid cream, or some coupon, etc. Or, it wants to give me the best search result when I search for something relevant. Or even marginally relevant.




Offline Scheavo

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #45 on: August 09, 2012, 07:32:13 PM »
http://news.yahoo.com/google-ordered-pay-record-22-5-million-violating-162006010--abc-news-tech.html?_esi=1

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The Federal Trade Commission has ordered Google to pay $22.5 million for violating user privacy on its Apple's Safari browser. It's the biggest FTC fine ever issued for a commission violation.

The federal agency found that Google had been tracking "cookies" on Google sites for Apple Safari users. It was also sending targeted ads to those users, which violated another settlement between the FTC and the search-engine giant.

My only complaint is that $22.5 million if basically nothing to Google.

Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #46 on: August 14, 2012, 12:40:24 PM »
Something that would absolutely benefit us all would be a way to find out where people get our info from.  Every time you get a spam email, you should be able to follow a link to find out who sold them your email address.  I think it'd be beneficial if people could complain to the people who are selling your info.

I have two throwaway yahoo accounts.  One is for traveling, and the other is what I use for things like signing up for prog-metal band related forums.  I don't give the traveling account to anybody, and after several years, there's not one spam message in it.  The other gets 20-30 emails a day (although I almost never log into it).  I noticed today that there was a message addressed to Abner.  My Tom Thumb rewards card is registered to Abner Wigglestaff, and that's the only time I've used that moniker.  It would appear that now my grocer (and more annoyingly my pharmacist) is farming out my info.  (I feel terrible for whoever the phone number I used belongs to.)

Not so coincidentally, the 4 emails Abner has gotten coincide with the rollout of their new "just 4 you" program that they've been hounding people about.  They're looking to link everybody's reward card with their android or iGadget.  Bastards.
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Offline Adami

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #47 on: August 14, 2012, 02:14:20 PM »
Something that would absolutely benefit us all would be a way to find out where people get our info from.  Every time you get a spam email, you should be able to follow a link to find out who sold them your email address.  I think it'd be beneficial if people could complain to the people who are selling your info.

That's an awful idea. We have to respect those corporations sense of privacy and anonymity!
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Offline ohgar

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #48 on: August 14, 2012, 03:22:28 PM »
People are now hauling ass to create a replacement for it which would allow voice, video and data communications in realtime with rock-solid encryption and anonymous routing.


It has already existed for a long time; it's called Jabber and it's free and open source.

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« Last Edit: August 14, 2012, 03:31:14 PM by ohgar »
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Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #49 on: May 10, 2013, 10:44:26 AM »
I guess this answers my OP question.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/08/us/politics/obama-may-back-fbi-plan-to-wiretap-web-users.html?_r=0

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WASHINGTON — The Obama administration, resolving years of internal debate, is on the verge of backing a Federal Bureau of Investigation plan for a sweeping overhaul of surveillance laws that would make it easier to wiretap people who communicate using the Internet rather than by traditional phone services, according to officials familiar with the deliberations.

The F.B.I. director, Robert S. Mueller III, has argued that the bureau’s ability to carry out court-approved eavesdropping on suspects is “going dark” as communications technology evolves, and since 2010 has pushed for a legal mandate requiring companies like Facebook and Google to build into their instant-messaging and other such systems a capacity to comply with wiretap orders. That proposal, however, bogged down amid concerns by other agencies, like the Commerce Department, about quashing Silicon Valley innovation.

The upshot of all of this is that The Man wants everybody to install backdoors to secure communications. A company that facilitates encrypted communication would be subject to massive fines if they didn't have a means of unencrypting said communication when presented with a court order. Like I suggested in the OP, it's pretty clear that we're not to be trusted, and that lack of trust is enough to warrant a significant amount of collateral damage.
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Offline Perpetual Change

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #50 on: May 10, 2013, 11:04:10 AM »
I've pretty much began devaluing both ideas. Not because I don't enjoy privacy, but because I don't trust privacy (from everyone but "The Man" obviously) to defend me.

In my opinion, the sooner we're all in glass houses, the better. That's not just glass ceilings, btw, where the man can look down on you, but glass walls, too, where you can look not only back up at The Man, but around and your neighbors, and obviously they can do the same to you.

In a Glass House scenario, The Man can pin anything on me he wants. But, if he's lying, everyone around me will know. Or, if the law he's trying to enforce is a ridiculous one most people ignore, there will hopefully be some kind of outrage.

I don't see any real advantages to the current way things are. If the Man wants to lie about me and arrest me for no reason, who'd know he was wrong?

So, to give an example, while I recognize the need for privacy when it comes to finances and employment and stuff, having all of my phone conversations uploaded to a streaming location for anyone anywhere to listen to would not bother me one bit, granted everyone else would be uploading their conversations. I'm sure we'd all find out some weird shit about one another, but that wouldn't bother me at all and in a way I think we'd all be better off for it in the long run.

Offline kirksnosehair

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #51 on: May 10, 2013, 11:49:24 AM »
They're looking to link everybody's reward card with their android or iGadget.  Bastards.


"reward cards" are the biggest scam going.  Pretty much every store does them now.  And they pressure you to get one every time you check out if you don't have their card.  What they do is jack up the prices of their products then only offer the actual "member price"  ::)  to people who have agreed to fork over their name, address, phone number and [sometimes] email address.


I have a memorized fake telephone number that I give them.  (It calls an automated weather hotline from a local radio station) and I give them the street address of the town dump.  I also have a few throwaway email addresses I use.  My car key ring must have 20 of those stupid little cards on it.  :|

Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #52 on: July 11, 2013, 03:59:14 PM »
The question I asked in the OP was whether or not our government would allow it's citizens to practice any anonymity and how could it do so. It seems that last week some payment providers were instructed by Visa and Mastercard to no longer accept their cards for billing VPN services. I suspect that answers my question. As a lot of skeevy Eastern European porn sites learned a while back,  credit cards are vital for their business. When Visa and MC blocked them out, most of them folded. I suspect that companies who exist to provide anonymity will probably fair better, as their customers are going to be more apt to use bitcoin or some other alternative billing service, but it's still going to hurt lots, and it certainly doesn't bode well for a country already hauling ass into police state territory.

http://siliconangle.com/blog/2013/07/08/fight-against-anonymization-services-mastercard-and-visa-block-payment-to-vpn-providers/ 
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Offline rumborak

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #53 on: July 11, 2013, 06:48:23 PM »
Yeah, I see bitcoin occupying exactly that niche. They recently busted some bank also that only existed for moving shifty money. All that will likely go through bitcoin.
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Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #54 on: July 11, 2013, 06:55:04 PM »
Well, yeah, but at the same time why should we assume that our government will permit people to use anonymous money? When I started this thread I asked if one of the darknets, for example, would be allowed to exist or be legally accessed. I'd have to ask the same thing about bitcoin. Hell, you can't even get prepaid credit cards over $500 without a SSN nowadays because of the terrorist bogeyman. I have to assume that either bitcoin is already cracked, or some legislation is already in the pipes to keep us from using it anonymously.
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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #55 on: July 11, 2013, 07:03:30 PM »
I have a memorized fake telephone number that I give them.  (It calls an automated weather hotline from a local radio station) and I give them the street address of the town dump.  I also have a few throwaway email addresses I use.  My car key ring must have 20 of those stupid little cards on it.  :|

I gave in and was going to get a KHOLS card because I go up there every few paycheck s and drop $100 or so on their 'discounted' or reduced price clothing. They asked me to swipe my debut card then enter my social security number  ??? Needless to say I didn't so I will be missing out on the additional 10% of 'savings'
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Offline rumborak

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #56 on: July 11, 2013, 07:12:43 PM »
Well, yeah, but at the same time why should we assume that our government will permit people to use anonymous money? When I started this thread I asked if one of the darknets, for example, would be allowed to exist or be legally accessed. I'd have to ask the same thing about bitcoin. Hell, you can't even get prepaid credit cards over $500 without a SSN nowadays because of the terrorist bogeyman. I have to assume that either bitcoin is already cracked, or some legislation is already in the pipes to keep us from using it anonymously.

I think it's just not at a level yet that demands attention. I doubt bitcoin can be reigned in, just like bittorrent can't.
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Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #57 on: July 11, 2013, 07:27:50 PM »
I don't think bittorrent is out of reach at all. It's still rolling along now because the laws aren't in place to stop it. Enact laws making it a crime to list a .torrent for copyrighted material, and give rights holders the legal ability to sue IP address holders and you'll see bittorrent turn Napster really fast.

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Offline Chino

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #58 on: July 11, 2013, 07:29:43 PM »
I found this pretty interesting. This is why I love Aljazeera. I'm guessing no US news network would tell this story.

http://stream.aljazeera.com/story/201307112159-0022901

Offline Fiery Winds

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #59 on: July 11, 2013, 07:59:17 PM »
I have a memorized fake telephone number that I give them.  (It calls an automated weather hotline from a local radio station) and I give them the street address of the town dump.  I also have a few throwaway email addresses I use.  My car key ring must have 20 of those stupid little cards on it.  :|

I gave in and was going to get a KHOLS card because I go up there every few paycheck s and drop $100 or so on their 'discounted' or reduced price clothing. They asked me to swipe my debut card then enter my social security number  ??? Needless to say I didn't so I will be missing out on the additional 10% of 'savings'

That's because a Kohl's card is a store credit card, not just a rewards membership. 
This thread has been burned.

Offline rumborak

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #60 on: July 11, 2013, 08:04:05 PM »
I don't think bittorrent is out of reach at all. It's still rolling along now because the laws aren't in place to stop it. Enact laws making it a crime to list a .torrent for copyrighted material, and give rights holders the legal ability to sue IP address holders and you'll see bittorrent turn Napster really fast.

Napster died because it still relied on central servers. Because of that governments could attack the weakest point and shut it down.
It's plain evolution really. Napster had a crucial flaw that could be attacked, so the software evolved to remove the flaw. If bitcoin isn't it in terms of decentralization, the next generation will be.

In general, decentralization will be become more prevalent over time I think. The next generation of Facebook will likely be a bittorrent-like approach too. End-to-end encrypted, with no central server to get data from.
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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #61 on: July 11, 2013, 08:07:13 PM »
I have a memorized fake telephone number that I give them.  (It calls an automated weather hotline from a local radio station) and I give them the street address of the town dump.  I also have a few throwaway email addresses I use.  My car key ring must have 20 of those stupid little cards on it.  :|

I gave in and was going to get a KHOLS card because I go up there every few paycheck s and drop $100 or so on their 'discounted' or reduced price clothing. They asked me to swipe my debut card then enter my social security number  ??? Needless to say I didn't so I will be missing out on the additional 10% of 'savings'

That's because a Kohl's card is a store credit card, not just a rewards membership.
Aaah...OK. I still felt like just typing my SS# and swiping my card was questionable. But I guess it's not as touchy as I thought.
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Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #62 on: July 11, 2013, 08:17:42 PM »
I don't think bittorrent is out of reach at all. It's still rolling along now because the laws aren't in place to stop it. Enact laws making it a crime to list a .torrent for copyrighted material, and give rights holders the legal ability to sue IP address holders and you'll see bittorrent turn Napster really fast.

Napster died because it still relied on central servers. Because of that governments could attack the weakest point and shut it down.
It's plain evolution really. Napster had a crucial flaw that could be attacked, so the software evolved to remove the flaw. If bitcoin isn't it in terms of decentralization, the next generation will be.

In general, decentralization will be become more prevalent over time I think. The next generation of Facebook will likely be a bittorrent-like approach too. End-to-end encrypted, with no central server to get data from.
I only cited Napster as an example of a failure in general; not a mechanism of failure. I think my assessment of Bittorrent is still valid.

As for decentralization, I suspect you're correct that's how things will progress. I also think it represents a loss of control that the government won't permit. As for how to crack down on it, what if all of the ISPs were bullied into enforcing their TOS restriction on operating as a server? Perhaps Uncle Sammy regulates who can or can't operate as as server.
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Offline rumborak

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #63 on: July 12, 2013, 01:15:27 PM »
I am suspecting the "servers" will be the Amazons and Dropboxes in the future; plain online file storage in which encrypted files are stored. Amazon is not breaking any law by hosting encrypted files (nor would they have any way of knowing what's in them).
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Offline Fiery Winds

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #64 on: October 02, 2013, 01:29:08 PM »
Speaking of the Feds shutting down servers, Silk Road is dead: http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/10/silk-road-raided/

I wonder how long until the next incarnation pops up.
This thread has been burned.

Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #65 on: October 08, 2013, 10:59:49 AM »
Speaking of the Feds shutting down servers, Silk Road is dead: http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2013/10/silk-road-raided/

I wonder how long until the next incarnation pops up.
And within a week they're already busting users. That's the problem with these sorts of things. You're only as secure as the people you trust. Still, I hope this pops up in a better form. Frankly, I like the people who are using Silk Road a whole lot more than the so-called good guys who are out to bust them.
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Offline slycordinator

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #66 on: October 08, 2013, 10:07:13 PM »
Women can't breast-feed in public.
At least 45 of the 50 states plus DC and the US Virgin Islands have laws specifically allowing breastfeeding in any public or private location.

Offline carl320

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #67 on: October 10, 2013, 06:45:57 AM »
Women can't breast-feed in public.
At least 45 of the 50 states plus DC and the US Virgin Islands have laws specifically allowing breastfeeding in any public or private location.

I don't know if it's because of legality.  It may be legal but that doesn't mean that people won't get offended, thinking it's lewd behavior.
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Online El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #68 on: October 10, 2013, 11:42:30 AM »
Read this during lunch today, in an article about one of Snowden's email hosts.

Quote from: Senator Obama
This is legislation that puts our own Justice Department above the law. When National Security Letters are issued, they allow federal agents to conduct any search on any American, no matter how extensive or wide-ranging, without ever going before a judge to prove that the search is necessary. They simply need sign-off from a local FBI official. That's all.

Once a business or a person receives notification that they will be searched, they are prohibited from telling anyone about it, and they are even prohibited from challenging this automatic gag order in court. Even though judges have already found that similar restrictions violate the First Amendment - this Conference Report disregards the case law and the right to challenge the gag order.

If you do decide to consult an attorney for legal advice - you have to tell the FBI that you have done so. This is unheard of - there is no such requirement in any other area of law, and I don't see why it is justified here.

And if someone wants to know why their own government has decided to go on a fishing expedition through every personal record or private document - through library books they've read and phone calls they've made - this legislation gives people no rights to appeal the need for such a search in a court of law. No judge will hear their plea, no jury will hear their case.

This is just plain wrong.
Argument, the presentation of reasonable views, never makes headway against conviction, and conviction takes no part in argument because it knows.
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Offline slycordinator

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #69 on: October 10, 2013, 11:55:13 AM »
Women can't breast-feed in public.
At least 45 of the 50 states plus DC and the US Virgin Islands have laws specifically allowing breastfeeding in any public or private location.

I don't know if it's because of legality.  It may be legal but that doesn't mean that people won't get offended, thinking it's lewd behavior.
One shouldn't change their behavior because of people that are stupid. Lewd would be breastfeeding the kid with her breast(s) in full view.