Author Topic: Privacy and anonymity  (Read 17559 times)

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Offline Chino

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #210 on: January 11, 2018, 01:30:24 PM »
Chipping babies is absolute insanity.


All I'll say to that is when I fell off the balcony, I left my wallet behind in the room. I went to the hospital unconscious in an ambulance and the doctors had no way of knowing who I was. They didn't know if I had any prior history with them. Previous medical implications that'd effect what they'd need to do. They didn't even know my last name. It was over 4 hours before they knew my identity.  It'd have been cool if they could have just scanned my arm with a wand and known who I was, my blood type, who my emergency contacts were, etc..

« Last Edit: January 12, 2018, 09:58:58 AM by Chino »

Offline cramx3

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #211 on: January 11, 2018, 01:33:59 PM »
But I think that's a bit different than tracking technology.  I do think we will eventually be scannable and have our basic info readily available to replace our IDs.  That seems like something from movies that will one day be a reality.

Offline El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #212 on: January 11, 2018, 01:41:29 PM »
All I'll say to that is when I fell off the balcony, I left my wallet behind in the room. I went to the hospital unconscious in an ambulance and the doctors had no way of knowing who I was. They didn't know if I had any prior history with them. Previous medical implications that'd effect what they'd need to do. They didn't even know my last name. It was over 4 hours before they knew my identity.  It'd have been cool if they could have just scanned my arm with a wand and known who I was, my blood type, who my emergency contacts were, etc..

I also think it would be cool. I just recognize that it would take a whopping 5 minutes for the courts to decide that you have no claim to privacy with regard to the implant, and it would become the simplest means there is to keep tabs on everybody. Before you go shooting RFIDs into people you should set some inviolable ground rules for how they can be used. That won't happen, though. As far as the government is concerned knowing who and where you are is what matters and saving your life in the ER is simply a side-effect.
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Offline Stadler

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #213 on: January 12, 2018, 09:39:00 AM »
Yeah, there are implications to that which I find troublesome.   You walk into a government building - where there are scanners and guards, and the implication is that you are surrendering some degree of expectation of privacy - and as you walk through that scanner, a light goes off that there is an outstanding warrant.  Or you go into a job interview and they already know you have the AIDS or are a smoker.   

I do like the Chino idea.  I get "HIPAA" - I was married to a woman that worked in healthcare for the entire 15 years of my marriage - but it BOGGLES me that in 2017, I have to physically take a folder of paper from doctor to doctor, and that it takes up to 30 days to transfer same.   My entire medical history ought to be readily available - at least to ME, since it's mine - on a thumb drive at a moments notice. 

Offline Chino

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #214 on: January 12, 2018, 10:08:32 AM »
All I'll say to that is when I fell off the balcony, I left my wallet behind in the room. I went to the hospital unconscious in an ambulance and the doctors had no way of knowing who I was. They didn't know if I had any prior history with them. Previous medical implications that'd effect what they'd need to do. They didn't even know my last name. It was over 4 hours before they knew my identity.  It'd have been cool if they could have just scanned my arm with a wand and known who I was, my blood type, who my emergency contacts were, etc..

I also think it would be cool. I just recognize that it would take a whopping 5 minutes for the courts to decide that you have no claim to privacy with regard to the implant, and it would become the simplest means there is to keep tabs on everybody. Before you go shooting RFIDs into people you should set some inviolable ground rules for how they can be used. That won't happen, though. As far as the government is concerned knowing who and where you are is what matters and saving your life in the ER is simply a side-effect.

Eh. That's not really a concern of mine. Even without chips, the government already can do that (and does that) to a large extent with cameras and facial recognition software.

Offline El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #215 on: January 12, 2018, 10:25:01 AM »
All I'll say to that is when I fell off the balcony, I left my wallet behind in the room. I went to the hospital unconscious in an ambulance and the doctors had no way of knowing who I was. They didn't know if I had any prior history with them. Previous medical implications that'd effect what they'd need to do. They didn't even know my last name. It was over 4 hours before they knew my identity.  It'd have been cool if they could have just scanned my arm with a wand and known who I was, my blood type, who my emergency contacts were, etc..

I also think it would be cool. I just recognize that it would take a whopping 5 minutes for the courts to decide that you have no claim to privacy with regard to the implant, and it would become the simplest means there is to keep tabs on everybody. Before you go shooting RFIDs into people you should set some inviolable ground rules for how they can be used. That won't happen, though. As far as the government is concerned knowing who and where you are is what matters and saving your life in the ER is simply a side-effect.

Eh. That's not really a concern of mine. Even without chips, the government already can do that (and does that) to a large extent with cameras and facial recognition software.
They can track my phone, unless I turn it off. They can track my car, unless I don't drive it. They can't track me (I'm immune to facial recognition). And because they can do those other things doesn't mean I'll just sign off on giving them more access.

Part of my concern is that as we continue to just blow off more and more avenues to privacy it increasingly becomes the norm. Privacy has value. By abandoning our concerns or trying to protect it we lessen its value, and that's a damn shame. People should be resisting more.
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Offline Stadler

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #216 on: January 12, 2018, 01:37:22 PM »
It's the head-tilt and the asymmetrical hair style, isn't it?   :)


I wish I had the energy and initiative to develop a full-on alternate identity for on-line usage.   It is the smart thing to do, but I have to put in the effort.   

Offline Cool Chris

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #217 on: January 12, 2018, 01:56:50 PM »
I have to physically take a folder of paper from doctor to doctor, and that it takes up to 30 days to transfer same.   My entire medical history ought to be readily available - at least to ME, since it's mine - on a thumb drive at a moments notice. 

I know you are an honest man so don't take this as me saying otherwise, but that sounds way out of whack. My daughter has been having periodic checks due to a kidney issue, and when the ultrasound is done the tech says the data will be sent right over to the doctor, in another city, electronically, and I know it happens because the doc will call me within the hour to discuss the results.

Your second point is spot on, though they won't consider the files yours because even though they are about you, that doesn't mean all the data and files related to you are yours.
"Nostalgia is just the ability to forget the things that sucked" - Nelson DeMille, 'Up Country'

Offline El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #218 on: January 12, 2018, 11:33:29 PM »
I have to physically take a folder of paper from doctor to doctor, and that it takes up to 30 days to transfer same.   My entire medical history ought to be readily available - at least to ME, since it's mine - on a thumb drive at a moments notice. 

I know you are an honest man so don't take this as me saying otherwise, but that sounds way out of whack. My daughter has been having periodic checks due to a kidney issue, and when the ultrasound is done the tech says the data will be sent right over to the doctor, in another city, electronically, and I know it happens because the doc will call me within the hour to discuss the results.
You're both right. Doctors suck ass when it comes to moving information about at your request to other doctors they're not set up with. When they put in an order with a provider they're set up with it happens damn fast with no hiccups. My primary doc and kidney doc can't exchange my information at all. No matter how many forms I fill out, and how many times I remind them they can't even exchange my labwork. Yet if one of them needs an MRI or CT or something, they'll put in a request with a provider in their system and the information moves about with no problems. I think it's the setup that's hard for them. Getting another doctor into their system. IF that ever happens the actual process is very efficient.

Quote
Your second point is spot on, though they won't consider the files yours because even though they are about you, that doesn't mean all the data and files related to you are yours.
I've never had any problem getting my records out of them. That's how I get the stuff from Dr. Kidney to Dr. Everythingelse. And while I'm not sure about the latter, the former puts everything up in my online portal so I've always got access to it.
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Offline Cool Chris

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #219 on: January 12, 2018, 11:41:54 PM »
Medical facilities are getting better about these online portals. It is nice to get a simple ping from your Doc saying "I posted your lab results online."

I think your point that the two docs can't share info is part of the problem, because they can they just hadn't bothered to spend 4 minutes to figure out how, despite it being in the best interest for all three of you.

Barto, I assume Dr Kidney is a Nephrologist? I didn't know that word until they discovered my daughter has a bad kidney. Luckily the good one in compensating well, and the bad one will just "go away." I found that weird at first, but I guess it makes sense if it is just tissue and can wither away.
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Offline El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #220 on: January 13, 2018, 08:35:50 AM »
Medical facilities are getting better about these online portals. It is nice to get a simple ping from your Doc saying "I posted your lab results online."

I think your point that the two docs can't share info is part of the problem, because they can they just hadn't bothered to spend 4 minutes to figure out how, despite it being in the best interest for all three of you.

Barto, I assume Dr Kidney is a Nephrologist? I didn't know that word until they discovered my daughter has a bad kidney. Luckily the good one in compensating well, and the bad one will just "go away." I found that weird at first, but I guess it makes sense if it is just tissue and can wither away.
In an adult they'll mostly go away. I've still got both of mine, but they're essentially shriveled up walnuts at this point. They make a point to do an ultrasound once a year to make sure there's nothing growing on them, but removing what's left is generally not worth the effort. The good news is that one's really all you need. One of the first tests they ran on Kidney Girl to see if she was compatible or not was to check and see if she actually had two to begin with. Turns out plenty of people decide to donate only to find they were only born with one and nobody ever knew.
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Offline Stadler

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #221 on: January 14, 2018, 08:01:49 AM »
Medical facilities are getting better about these online portals. It is nice to get a simple ping from your Doc saying "I posted your lab results online."

I think your point that the two docs can't share info is part of the problem, because they can they just hadn't bothered to spend 4 minutes to figure out how, despite it being in the best interest for all three of you.

Barto, I assume Dr Kidney is a Nephrologist? I didn't know that word until they discovered my daughter has a bad kidney. Luckily the good one in compensating well, and the bad one will just "go away." I found that weird at first, but I guess it makes sense if it is just tissue and can wither away.
In an adult they'll mostly go away. I've still got both of mine, but they're essentially shriveled up walnuts at this point. They make a point to do an ultrasound once a year to make sure there's nothing growing on them, but removing what's left is generally not worth the effort. The good news is that one's really all you need. One of the first tests they ran on Kidney Girl to see if she was compatible or not was to check and see if she actually had two to begin with. Turns out plenty of people decide to donate only to find they were only born with one and nobody ever knew.

My Dad. 

Did you ever meet Kidney Girl (just curious; you don't have to answer).   It sounds like the stuff of a Lifetime movie.

Offline Stadler

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #222 on: January 14, 2018, 08:02:20 AM »
Medical facilities are getting better about these online portals. It is nice to get a simple ping from your Doc saying "I posted your lab results online."

I think your point that the two docs can't share info is part of the problem, because they can they just hadn't bothered to spend 4 minutes to figure out how, despite it being in the best interest for all three of you.

Barto, I assume Dr Kidney is a Nephrologist? I didn't know that word until they discovered my daughter has a bad kidney. Luckily the good one in compensating well, and the bad one will just "go away." I found that weird at first, but I guess it makes sense if it is just tissue and can wither away.

I do get all my lab results in one spot online, so I'm at least that advanced.

Offline El Barto

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #223 on: January 14, 2018, 11:15:37 AM »
Medical facilities are getting better about these online portals. It is nice to get a simple ping from your Doc saying "I posted your lab results online."

I think your point that the two docs can't share info is part of the problem, because they can they just hadn't bothered to spend 4 minutes to figure out how, despite it being in the best interest for all three of you.

Barto, I assume Dr Kidney is a Nephrologist? I didn't know that word until they discovered my daughter has a bad kidney. Luckily the good one in compensating well, and the bad one will just "go away." I found that weird at first, but I guess it makes sense if it is just tissue and can wither away.
In an adult they'll mostly go away. I've still got both of mine, but they're essentially shriveled up walnuts at this point. They make a point to do an ultrasound once a year to make sure there's nothing growing on them, but removing what's left is generally not worth the effort. The good news is that one's really all you need. One of the first tests they ran on Kidney Girl to see if she was compatible or not was to check and see if she actually had two to begin with. Turns out plenty of people decide to donate only to find they were only born with one and nobody ever knew.

My Dad. 

Did you ever meet Kidney Girl (just curious; you don't have to answer).   It sounds like the stuff of a Lifetime movie.
She's my step-sister.


edit: Here's the story. Episode 34: Kidney Time for Barto
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 11:28:44 AM by El Barto »
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Offline cramx3

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Re: Privacy and anonymity
« Reply #224 on: January 16, 2018, 07:54:36 AM »
My surgeon friend was just saying we need to get a cloud based hospital system for easy access.  Medical IT is going to be big business once people can figure out a way to deal with the legalities and get everything to start communicating with each other in an efficient but still private way.